Olivet College Fifteenth Annual Catalog

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1 Olivet Nazarene University Digital Olivet Catalog Academic Affairs Office 1923 Olivet College Fifteenth Annual Catalog Olivet Nazarene University Olivet Nazarene University Follow this and additional works at: Part of the Christian Denominations and Sects Commons, Christianity Commons, and the Higher Education Commons Recommended Citation University, Olivet Nazarene, "Olivet College Fifteenth Annual Catalog " (1923). Catalog This Book is brought to you for free and open access by the Academic Affairs Office at Digital Olivet. It has been accepted for inclusion in Catalog by an authorized administrator of Digital Olivet. For more information, please contact

2 (ilttipt, 3JUtnota Fifteenth ANNUAL CATALOG

3 1923 COLLEGE CALENDAR September 3 Monday Alumni Reunion and Program. September 4 Tuesday Matriculation and Registration. September 5 Wednesday Instruction Begins. October Convention with C. W. Ruth. November 29 Thursday Thanksgiving Day, Holiday. December 21 Friday Christmas Vacation Begins January January 2 Wednesday School Work Resumed. 9 Wednesday Semester Examinations Begin. January 12 Saturday First Semester Ends. January 15 Tuesday Second Semester Begins. February 22 Friday Washington s Birthday, Holiday. April 5 Saturday Graduation Theses and Orations Due. May 3 Saturday Semester Examinations Begin. May 11 Sunday Baccalaureate Sunday. May 8-15 Commencement Exercises, Program each after noon. May 8-18 Camp Meeting.

4 (fihtttet, Sllin n ta Fifteenth ANNUAL CATALOG

5 O l iv e t C ollege TABLE OF CONTENTS Page C o lle g e C a l e n d a r In s id e F r o n t C o v e r B o a r d o f T r u s t e e s 3 O fficers o f I n s t r u c t io n 4 G e n e r a l I n f o r m a t i o n B u ild in g s a n d G r o u n d s E d u c a t io n a l O r g a n i z a t i o n I n s tr u c t io n s f o r B o a r d in g S tu d e n ts 27 G e n e ra l E x p e n s e s _ 28 C o lle g e o f L ib e r a l A r t s a n d S c ie n c e s R e q u ire m e n ts f o r A d m i s s i o n - 32 R e q u ire m e n ts f o r G r a d u a tio n D e g r e e s. _ - 35 D e s c r ip t io n o f C o u rses... _ 37 B ib le C o lle g e 50 D e g r e e C o u r s e s. _ D e s c r ip t io n o f C o u rse s 51 S p e cia l C o u r s e s _. 61 C o r re s p o n d e n ce C o u rse S c h o o l o f M u s ic... _... _.... ~ 61 P ia n o V o ic e E v a n g e lis t ic S in g in g 62 V io lin. 63 D e p a r tm e n t o f E x p r e s s io n a n d A r t... _ H ig h S c h o o l. 67 C o m m e r cia l D e p a r t m e n t _ 75 S u b -P r e p a r a t o r y.._ 77 L is t o f G r a d u a te s 78 S tu d e n t R e g is te r 80

6 O l iv e t C o ll e g e BOARD OF TRUSTEES T E R M E X P I R E S 1953 D r. J. G. M o r r i s o n Jam estown, N. Dak. R e v. E. E. TURNER Indianapolis, Ind. R e v. M. E. B o r d e r s - _... Chicago, III. M r. E. S. C u n n i n g h a m _ Mansfield, 111. R e v. R. V. S t a r r. _ Lansing, Mich. M r. E. S. B e n n e r.... Caledonia, Ohio T E R M E X P I R E S 1924 D r. E d w in B u r k e... Chicago, III. R e v. 0. R. C h i l t o n. _... Columbus, Ohio- R e v. J. W. S h o r t _... Indianapolis, Ind.. R e v. W. G. S c h u r m a n. Chicago, III. T E R M E X P I R E S 1925 R e v. T. W. W i l l i n g h a m Danville, III. R e v. C. H. S t r o n g _. Chicago, III. R e v. C. L. B r a d l e y Flint, Mich. R e v. E. O. C h a t,r a n t Danville, III. R e v. II. L. K e n z ie. DesMoines, la. M r. M. L. D o e b l e r Sioux City, la. OFFICERS OF THE BOARD President._ D r. E d w i n B u r k Vice-President R e v. J. W. S H O R T Treasurer.. R e v. T. W. W i l l i n g h a m Secretary R e v. E. O. C h a l f a n t 3

7 O l iv e t C o lleg e OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION COLLEGE N. W. S A N F O R D, M.S., B.D., P re s id e n t P e n ie l C o lle g e ; U n iv e r s it y o f A r k a n s a s ; G r a d u a te S tu d e n t U n iv e r s it y o f Illin o is. Education and Philosophy 4

8 O l iv e t C o llege E L S I E J E N K S, A.B. O liv et C ollege. Registrar R E V. M A D I S O N F. G R O S E, A.B. U niversity of Southern California ; Graduate Studen t o f sam e in stitu tion. Dean of Theology M R S. F. A. P E A K E, A.M. Grant U niversity ; Chattanooga University. Ancient and Modern Languages

9 O l iv e t C ollege C A R L S. M c C L A I N, A.B. O liv e t C o lle g e ; Student o f U n iv ersity of Illin ois. English T. S. G R E E R, B.S., A.B. K in g s w o o d C o lle g e ; O liv et C o lle g e ; G ra duate Studen t Illin o is State N o r m a l; U niversity o f Illin ois ; N orthw estern U niversity. History and Economics J. B. G A L L O W A Y, B.S., P h.b., B.D. Peniel C ollege; Graduate Student U niversity of K ansas ; Southern M ethodist U niversity. Bible and Theology 6

10 O l iv e t C o lleg e H. H. P R I C E, A.B. Peniel C ollege; Graduate Student U niversity of M ississippi. Mathematics J. W. S T O K E, B.S., B.P e d. G raduate Studen t U n iv e rsity o f M issou ri. Science E. W A Y N E S T A H L, A.B.,B.E.,B.D. S im p son C o lle g e ; C olu m b ia C ollege o f Expression ; N orthw estern U niversity ; Student Curry School o f Expression. Greek 7

11 O l iv e t C o llege ACADEMY MRS. S. R. BURKHOLDER, A.B. O liv e t C o lle g e ; Studen t C olu m bia U niversity. French MRS. GEO. CHESEMORE, A.B. O liv et C ollege. English ROSE BAUERLE, A.B. O livet College. Mathematics and History 8

12 O l iv e t C o llege T. S. G R E E R, B.S., A.B. K ingsw ood C olleg e ; O livet C ollege ; G ra duate S tu den t Illin ois State N orm al; U niversity o f Illin ois ; N orthw estern U niversity. History H. H. P R I C E, A.B. Pen iel C o lle g e ; G raduate Student U niversity o f M ississippi. Mathematics J. W. S T O K E, B.S., B.P e d. A G N E S R. A N D E R S O N Graduate Student U niversity ot Girls Nazarene School. Coban, M issouri. Guatemala. C. A. Science Spanish N A O M I D. W I S L E R T re b e e ca C ollege. Latin

13 O l iv e t C o lleg e FINE ARTS S. R. B U R K H O L D E R, B.S., B.M u s. O liv et C o lle g e ; X. Y. S ch o o l of M u s ic and A rts. Director of Music J. R. C A I N Student o f Joseph V ilim and Carl B ecker. Violin and Guitar F E R N K N O X O livet College. Piano 10

14 O l iv e t Co llege M R S. H E R M A N H. P R I C E, A.B., B.M u s. K ingsw ood C ollege and Conservatory. Piano J O E A N D H E L E N P E T E R S O livet C o lle g e ; A sb u ry C o lle g e C o n s e rv a to ry ; L ou isv ille C o n s e rv a to ry ; Students Chicago M usic College. Voice 11

15 O l iv e t C ollege A rt A cadem y, Cincinnati. MYRTLE SHERMAN A rt E. W AYN E STAHL, A.B., B.E., B.D. Sim pson C ollege; Colum bia College of E xpression ; N orthw estern U niversity ; Student Curry School of Expression. Expression 12

16 O l iv e t C o ll e g e COMMERCIAL M A R G A R E T S M I T H G eorgetow n H igh School. Shorthand, and Typewriting C H E S T E R S. H A R T E R R ich m o n d H ig h Sch ool. Bookkeeping M I S S A N N A C O X G raduate St. L ou is B a p tist H osp ita l. Director of Hospital, Nursing 13

17 O l iv e t C o llege SUB-PREPARATORY IDA MAE REED, Principal English, Mathematics CARL S. McCLAIN, A.B. Librarian M. RUTH WHITE Secretary to President ALFRED A PPLEBY History, Geography MISS JEN N IE KNOP Matron CULINARY DEPARTMENT MRS. LAURA PRYOR, Head Cook MRS. A. H. McCLAIN, Assistant 14

18 Oliv e t C o llege GENERAL INFORMATION HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT O liv e t C o lle g e is th e o u t g r o w th o f a d eep c o n v ic tio n o f a g r e a t n e e d, b o r n o f p r a y e r a n d fa it h in G od. C e rta in m en, w h o h a d b e e n led in to th e e x p e r ie n c e o f h e a r t h o lin e ss, a n d th u s in to d eep fe llo w s h ip w it h J e s u s C h r is t in H is p u r p o s e s f o r th e w o r ld, s e e in g t h a t th e B ib le a n d r e lig io u s t e a c h in g s w e r e p r a c t ic a lly e lim in a te d fr o m th e p u b lic sch o o ls, a n d th a t, u n d e r th e se c irc u m s ta n c e s n o t e v e n th e p r o p e r s ta n d a r d s o f m o r a lit y c o u ld b e m a in t a in e d ; a lso s e e in g th e p r e v a le n c e o f d e s tr u c t iv e h ig h e r c r it ic is m in th e c o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s it ie s b y w h ic h th e p r in c ip le s o f o u r h o ly fa it h w e r e b e in g u n d e r m in e d, f e l t t h a t s o m e th in g d iffe r e n t sh o u ld b e p r o v id e d f o r th e e d u c a t io n o f t h e ir c h ild re n a n d th e c h ild r e n o f th e ir n e ig h b o r s, w h o w e r e o f lik e p r e c io u s fa it h. A c c o r d in g ly, d u r in g th e fa ll o f 1907 a sm a ll sch o o l wast o p e n e d in a r e s id e n c e b u ild in g in G e o r g e to w n, Illin o is, w it h M iss M a r y N e s b it a s te a c h e r. T h is sm a ll s c h o o l o f c o u r s e d id n o t s a t i s f y ; a n d th e n e x t y e a r th e p r e s e n t lo c a t io n, m id w a y b e tw e e n G e o r g e to w n an d R id g e f a r m on th e I n t e r u r b a n c a r lin e, w a s se le cte d. sm a ll th r e e -r o o m fr a m e b u ild in g w a s e r e cte d, a n d th e s c h o o l e n la r g e d to a n A c a d e m y w it h P r o f. F r e d M e sch a s p r in c ip a l. F o r t y a c r e s o f la n d w e r e se cu re d a n d fo u r t e e n a c r e s la id o ff a s a c a m p u s, a n d th e r e s t s u b d iv id e d in to r e s id e n c e lo ts. L a t e r o th e r la n d w a s se cu r e d, a p a r t o f w h ic h w a s r e s e r v e d f o r a c a m p m e e tin g g r o u n d. T h e s ch o o l p r o s p e r e d a s a n A c a d e m y ; b u t th e T ru s te e s w e r e lo o k in g a h ea d a n d p la n n in g f o r g r e a t e r th in g s. T h e n e x t y e a r a la r g e, t h r e e -s t o r y, b r ic k b u ild in g w a s e r e cte d, th e p r e s e n t g i r l s d o r m ito r y, a n d th e C o lle g e o f L ib e r a l A r t s w a s a d d ed. D r. A. M. H ills w a s ch o sen P r e s i d e n t, a n d s e rv e d in t h a t c a p a c it y f o r on e y e a r. A H e w a s s u cce e d e d b y P r o f. E z r a T. F r a n k lin, w h o h e ld th e p o s itio n f o r tw o y e a r s. 15

19 O l iv e t C o llege T h e s ch o o l q u ick ly o u t g r e w th is b u ild in g, a n d a n o th e r, th e p r e s e n t A d m in is tr a t io n B u ild in g, w a s e r e c t e d a n d fin a lly co m p le te d d u r in g th e su m m e r o f 1913, t h o u g h a p a r t o f it h a d b e e n u sed th e y e a r b e fo r e. I t w a s t h o u g h t b y th o s e in c o n t r o l t h a t th e s c h o o l sh o u ld b e p la ce d u n d e r th e c a r e o f so m e c h u rch to in s u r e its p e r m a n e n c y a n d g r e a t e r u s e fu ln e s s. A c c o r d in g ly, in th e s p r in g o f 1912, i t w a s te n d e re d to th e C h u rch o f th e N a z a r e n e, w h ic h C h u rc h a c c e p te d th e g i f t a n d a ssu m e d c o n t r o l. T h e g e n e r a l a d m in is tra tio n is v e s te d in a B o a r d o f s e v e n te e n T r u s te e s, w h o a re n o m in a te d b y t h e s ix d is tr ic t a s s e m b lie s o f th e C h u rch o f th e N a z a r e n e, in c lu d e d in th e C e n tr a l E d u c a t io n a l D is t r ic t. T h e B o a r d o f T r u s t e e s e le c ts th e P r e s id e n t o f th e C o lle g e, a n d u p o n h is r e co m m e n d a tio n, th e m e m b e r s o f th e fa c u lt y. W it h r e g a r d to d ir e c t a d m in is t r a t io n : T h e P r e s id e n t o f th e C o lle g e sh a ll be th e h e a d e x e c u tiv e o f th e s c h o o l a n d sh a ll be a m e n a b le to th e B o a r d o f T ru s te e s. H e sh a ll d ir e c t th e a ffa ir s o f th e C o lle g e in h a r m o n y w it h p r in c ip le s a n d p o lic ie s m a r k e d o u t b y th e B o a r d o f T ru s te e s. H e sh a ll h a v e fu ll a u th o r it y in m a tte r s o f s c h o la rsh ip a n d d is cip lin e. T h e h e a d s o f th e d iffe r e n t d e p a rtm e n ts sh a ll c o n s t itu te a F a c u lt y C o u n cil, w h o s h a ll b e a d v is o r y to h im in th e s e m a t t e rs. H e m a y d e le g a te th e d is c ip lin e t o a d e a n o f m e n a n d a d e a n o f w o m e n, b u t th e y sh a ll a c t u n d e r h is in s tr u c t io n. T h e P r e s id e n t sh a ll g u a r d c a r e fu lly th e w o r k o f e v e r y D e p a r t m e n t. P U R P O S E T h e c h ie f en d o f m a n is to g l o r i f y G od a n d e n jo y H im f o r e v e r. T h e g r e a t p u r p o s e o f a n y tr u e e d u c a t io n a l in s t it u t io n m u st be to a s s is t m en to m e e t s u c c e s s fu lly th is en d. O u r d e s ire is to p r o v id e o p p o r t u n it ie s t h a t w ill d e v e lo p all t h a t is b e s t in m a n ; to e s ta b lis h a s t r o n g c e n te r o f s p ir it u a l p o w e r, an d h o ly c u ltu r e t h a t w ill flo w fo r t h a s a m ig h ty s tre a m o f in flu en ce to th e fo u r q u a r te r s o f th e e a r t h ; t o f u r n is h y o u n g m en a n d y o u n g w o m e n w ith a n e q u ip m e n t th a t w ill e n a b le th em to fo llo w th e d iffe r e n t v o c a tio n s o f life a n d to p r o m o t e th e k in g d o m o f C h rist. W h ile e x a lt in g th e in te lle c tu a l, w e m a g n ify th e S p ir it u a l. W e seek th e b r o a d e s t s c h o la r s h ip a n d th e d e e p e st p ie ty, 16

20 O l iv e t C ollege k n o w in g t h a t th e y a r e t h o r o u g h ly c o m p a tib le. T h e officers a n d te a c h e r s seek t o im p r e s s u p o n th e stu d e n ts th e n e c e s s ity o f o b e d ie n c e to C h ris t, a s w e ll a s h ig h s c h o la s tic a tta in m e n ts. W e se e k to t r a in, n o t a m e re a n im a l to d o w o r k in th is w o r ld, b u t a m a n to liv e t r iu m p h a n t ly a n d to s e rv e e fficie n tly in th is w o r ld a n d in th e n e x t. W e se e k t o g iv e th e B ib le its r ig h t f u l p la c e in th e w o r k o f e d u c a tio n. n e e d e d a s s u r a n c e o f c e r t a in ty. O n e a u t h o r it y is n o t su fficien t to g iv e th e w itn e s s e s sh a ll a ll th in g s b e e sta b lish e d. In th e m o u th o f tw o o r th re e S o f a r a s n a t u r e s p o w e r o f r e v e la tio n r e a c h e s, it is a r e lia b le s o u rce o f in fo r m a t io n, a n d is th e o n ly o n e c o n s id e r e d in th e m o d e rn s c h o o ls. B u t n a tu re a lo n e is in su fficien t. T h e B ib le is a lso a n a u th o r it a t iv e s o u rce o f in fo r m a t io n, a n d w e ta k e it w ith u s in a ll o u r w o r k. I t is m o s t v a lu a b le in h is t o r y, lite r a t u r e, s c ie n c e, a n d p h ilo s o p h y, a s w e ll a s in t h e o lo g y. W e c o n s u lt b o th th e se a u th o r it ie s fr e e ly, a n d b a s e o u r t e a c h in g u p o n t h e ir co m b in e d r e v e la tio n s. O liv e t is lo c a t e d L O C A T I O N in a m o s t b e a u t ifu l p a r t o f Illin o is, in t h e g r e a t c o r n b e lt, w it h fe r t ile field s, s p le n d id o r c h a r d s, a n d b e a u t ifu l g r o v e s a ll a ro u n d i t ; a b o u t h a lf w a y d o w n th e s ta te, n e a r th e In d ia n a lin e, t w e lv e m ile s fr o m th e W a b a s h r iv e r, a n d o n e - h a lf m ile fr o m th e L itt le V e r m ilio n ; it lies m id w a y b e tw e e n G e o r g e to w n to th e n o r th a n d R id g e - fa r m to th e s o u th, v illa g e s o f a b o u t t w o th o u s a n d, a n d is t h ir te e n m ile s s o u th o f D a n v ille, a c it y o f f o r t y th o u s a n d. O liv e t is a v illa g e o f b e tw e e n f if t y a n d s ix t y re s id e n ce s. N o c le a n e r t o w n m o r a lly ca n b e fo u n d. p o p u la t io n a r e e a r n e s t C h r is tia n s. A lm o s t th e e n tire E v e r y f o o t o f la n d sold c a r r ie s w ith it a d eed fo r b id d in g th e sa le o r g iv in g a w a y o f to b a c c o, liq u o rs a n d o p ia te s. is fr e q u e n t ly h e a rd. T h e v o ic e o f s o n g a n d p r a is e O liv e t is c o n n e cte d b y c o n c r e te r o a d s w it h C h ic a g o an d w it h p r a c t ic a lly a ll th e t o w n s in th e c o u n tr y, a n d a lso w it h a n u m b e r o f c itie s in a d jo in in g co u n tie s. I t is c o n n e cte d b y r o c k r o a d s o u th a s f a r a s E v a n s v ille, In d ia n a, a n d e a st w it h In d ia n a p o lis, I n d ia n a ; C in c in n a ti a n d C o lu m b u s, O h io. I t is o n th e D ix ie B e e L in e fr o m C h ic a g o to N e w O rle a n s. 17

21 O l iv e t C o llege W e h a v e o u r o w n p o s t office a n d a ll m a il a n d p a r c e l p o s t p a c k a g e s sh o u ld b e a d d re s s e d to O liv e t. F r e ig h t a n d e x p r e s s sh o u ld b e a d d re s s e d to G e o r g e to w n, I llin o is, P r e p a id f r e ig h t m a y b e b ille d t o O liv e t, v ia th e I llin o is T r a c t io n C o m p a n y. H O W T O R E A C H T H E S C H O O L T h e C o lle g e is r e a c h e d b y I n t e r u r b a n c a r s w h ic h ru n fr o m D a n v ille to R id g e fa r m. F o u r r a ilr o a d s co m e in to D a n v ille ; th e B ig F o u r, W a b a s h, C h ic a g o a n d E a s t e r n Illin o is, a n d C h ic a g o a n d In d ia n a S o u th e rn. In D a n v ille t h e r e a r e c it y s t r e e t c a r c o n n e c tio n s w it h th e In t e r u r b a n S ta tio n. a b a g g a g e m a n a n d h a v e y o u r tru n k t r a n s fe r r e d to th e I n t e r u r b a n S ta tio n. See C o m e o u t t o O liv e t o n t h e R id g e f a r m c a r, w h ic h le a v e s th e s ta tio n a t th e e v e n h o u r. T w o r a ilr o a d s co m e in to R id g e f a r m, th e C a ir o b r a n c h o f t h e B ig F o u r, a n d th e T o le d o, S t. L o u is & W e s te r n. U p o n a r r iv a l a t e ith e r o f th e se d e p o ts, w a lk a fe w b lo c k s e a st, a n d g e t th e I n t e r u r b a n t o O liv e t. A D V A N T A G E S O liv e t C o lle g e p o s s e s s e s m a n y a d v a n t a g e s in v ie w o f t h e p u r p o s e f o r w h ic h it h a s b e e n e s ta b lis h e d. 1. A h ig h s p ir it u a l to n e. A c o n s t a n t r e v iv a l a t m o s p h e r e, a n d a d eep m is s io n a r y s p ir it a r e p r e v a le n t. I t is an a tm o s p h e re, in w h ic h s t u r d y C h r is tia n c h a r a c t e r is d e v e lo p e d a n d s t r o n g r e lig io u s le a d e r s h ip f o r th e f u t u r e is p r e p a r e d. T h e r e lig io u s s p ir it is n o t n a r r o w n o r s e c ta ria n. T h e s t u d e n t b o d y in clu d e s m e m b e r s o f m a n y d e n o m in a tio n s. 2. A fa c u lt y s t r o n g in s c h o la rsh ip a n d t e a c h in g sk ill. M a n y h o ld a d v a n c e d d e g r e e s fr o m le a d in g U n iv e r s it ie s. 3. E x c e lle n t la b o r a t o r y a n d lib r a r y fa c ilit ie s, w h ic h a re c o n s t a n tly b e in g a u g m e n te d, a n d modern ivell-eqnipped BUILDINGS. 4. A h ig h s ta n d a r d o f s c h o la rsh ip. 5. C lo se c o n t a c t o f in d iv id u a l stu d e n t w it h in s t r u c t o r s w h o s e c h a r a c t e r a n d a b ilit y q u ick e n th e in te lle c tu a l, s p ir it u a l, a n d s o cia l l i f e o f stu d en ts. 6. A d a p t a t io n o f c o u r s e o f s tu d y t o fit th e n e e d s o f th e in d iv id u a l stu d en t. 18

22 O l iv e t C o llege 7. C o n d itio n s f a v o r in g fin a n c ia l e c o n o m y o n th e p a r t o f s tu d e n ts a n d a t t r a c t iv e to fa m ilie s w h o c o m e t o lo c a t e in th e c o m m u n ity. 8. A n o p p o r t u n it y f o r y o u n g m en a n d y o u n g w o m e n, w h o h a v e b e e n a w a k e n e d s o m e w h a t la te in l i f e to th e n eed o f e d u c a tio n to ta k e su ch p r e p a r a t o r y s u b je c t s a n d p u sh o n t o t h e h ig h e r b r a n c h e s, a n d s e c u r e a fu n d a m e n t a l t r a in in g in th e B ib le a s w e ll. 9. H o s p it a l S e r v ic e. B U I L D I N G S A N D G R O U N D S T h e C o lle g e o w n s in c o n n e ctio n w it h th e c a m p u s o f fo u r t e e n a c r e s, h a n d s o m e a n d c o m m o d io u s b u ild in g s. o f a ll is th e F ir s t Administration Building T h is is a b rick stru ctu re, fin ish e d in w h it e s t o n e ; 140 fe e t lo n g, 40 fe e t w id e, th re e s t o r ie s ; c o n ta in s la r g e c h a p e l, lib r a r y, s o c ie ty h a lls, offices, s tu d y h a ll, r e c it a t io n r o o m s, e tc. T h is b u ild in g is v e r y c o m m o d io u s an d c o n v e n ie n t ; is lig h t e d b y e le c t r ic it y, a n d h e a te d b y s te a m ; it w a s com p leted in 1913 an d co st ab ou t $50,000. In th e A d m in is t r a t io n B u ild in g is th e L ib r a r y. W e h a v e a g o o d s t a r t f o r a n e x c e lle n t lib r a r y, m a n y b o o k s a n d p e r io d ica ls fo r th e use o f all m em bers o f the C ollege. T h e S cie n c e L a b o r a t o r y is s u p p lie d w ith a su fficien t a m o u n t o f a p p a r a tu s a n d in s tr u m e n ts f o r g o o d la b o r a t o r y w o rk. Canaan Hall co m e s n e x t in size a n d im p o r ta n c e. T h is a lso is o f b r ic k a n d w h ite sto n e, t h r e e s t o r ie s ; m a in p a r t 120 fe e t lo n g b y 40 f e e t w id e, w ith a n ell 40 b y 40 fe e t. In t h is b u ild in g a r e th e d in in g ro o m, k itch e n, p a n tr ie s, e tc., o n th e fir s t flo o r. a n d o t h e r r o o m s o f g o o d size. S e c o n d a n d t h ir d s to rie s c o n ta in sle e p in g I t is lig h te d b y e le c t r ic it y a n d h e a te d b y steam t h r o u g h o u t ; it h a s h o t a n d c o ld w a t e r, b a th ro o m s a n d t o ile ts, a n d o t h e r c o n v e n ie n ce s on e a ch floor. T h e p r in c ip a l p a r t o f C a n a a n H a ll is u sed a s a d o rm i t o r y f o r th e g ir ls, w h ile th e ell is s e p a r a te d f o r u se b y th e b o y s. Heating Plant and Laundry D u r in g 1916 th e re w a s e re cte d a sp le n d id b r ic k b u ild in g f o r a ste a m h e a tin g p la n t w h ich fu r n is h e s stea m h e a t a n d h o t w a t e r f o r th e A d m in is 19

23 O l i v e t C o llege t r a tio n B u ild in g, th e D o r m it o r y, th e H o s p it a l, th e P r e s i d e n t s R e s id e n c e a n d th e M u s ic H a ll, w h ic h b e lo n g to th e C o lle g e. W e h a v e a m p le c a p a c it y f o r fu r n is h in g s te a m t o t w ic e th e n u m b e r o f b u ild in g s sh o u ld o u r g r o w t h r e q u ir e th em. T h is is a v e r y v a lu a b le a d d itio n t o o u r s p le n d id e q u ip m e n t. I t h a s s o lv e d m o s t s a t is fa c t o r ily th e v e r y tro u b le so m e q u e s tio n o f h e a tin g. I t in v o lv e d a v e r y h e a v y e x p e n se, b u t th e g r e a t a d v a n ta g e s w h ic h c o m e fr o m it in th e w a y o f c o m fo r t a n d co n v e n ie n ce a n d p le a s u r e t o th e s tu d e n t b o d y a m p ly ju s t ifie d th e la r g e o u tla y. In th e sa m e b u ild in g w e h a v e a la r g e s te a m la u n d r y w ith m o d e rn e q u ip m e n t, w h ic h is a r e a l n e c e s s it y, a s th e C o lle g e is lo c a t e d in a v illa g e w h ic h h a s n o lo c a l la u n d r y. T h is a lso a d d s to th e c o m f o r t a n d c o n v e n ie n ce o f a ll c o n c e rn e d. Other Buildings N e a r C a n a a n H a ll t h e r e a r e t h r e e g o o d t w o -s t o r y fr a m e b u ild in g s, o n e o f w h ic h is th e P r e s i d e n t s r e s id e n ce, o n e is th e M u s ic H a ll, a n d o n e is t h e H o s p ita l b u ild in g. T h e se b u ild in g s a re lig h t e d b y e le c t r ic it y a n d h e a te d b y stea m, a n d a ll h a v e b a th s, to ile t s, a n d h o t a n d co ld w a te r. T H E C O L L E G E H O S P I T A L W e h a v e a n ic e ly fu r n is h e d h o s p it a l f o r th e u se o f o u r stu d e n ts. O u r g r a d u a t e n u r s e g iv e s c o u r s e s in t h a t lin e o f w o r k a n d stu d e n ts a re a llo w e d to a s s is t w it h su ch ca s e s a s m a y be b r o u g h t t o th e h o s p it a l. T h e n u r s e is a lw a y s g la d to c o n s u lt w ith a s tu d e n t a b o u t t h e ir p h y s ic a l c o n d i t io n s a n d w ill g iv e su ch re m e d ie s a s sh e m a y th in k b e s t f o r th em. I f th e n eed o f a p h y s ic ia n a r is e s, sh e w ill a d v is e th e stu d e n ts w it h r e g a r d to th is m a tte r. In ca s e s o f c o n t a g io u s d is e a s e s, th e p a t ie n t is r e m o v e d t o th e h o s p ita l a n d g iv e n su ch c a r e a s th e ca se m a y d e m a n d. E v e r y e ffo r t is m a d e to k e e p th e s tu d e n t b o d y in g o o d sh a p e p h y s ic a lly. E D U C A T I O N A L O R G A N I Z A T I O N T h e w o r k o f th e C o lle g e is o ffe r e d t h r o u g h t h r e e s c h o o ls : th e C o lle g e o f A r t s a n d S c ie n c e s, th e B ib le C o lle g e, a n d th e S c h o o l o f M u s ic. In a d d itio n, th e C o lle g e s u p p o r ts a r e g u 20

24 O l iv e t C o llege la r ly s t a t e -a c c r e d it e d A c a d e m y, C o m m e r cia l D e p a r tm e n t, E x p r e s s io n a n d A r t, N u r s e s T r a in in g C o u rses, M e d ic a l M is s io n a r y T r a in in g D e p a r tm e n t. C o u r s e s a re o ffe r e d in t h e v a r io u s d e p a r tm e n ts le a d in g to th e f o llo w in g d e g r e e s : B a c h e lo r o f A r t s. B a c h e lo r o f D iv in it y. B a c h e lo r o f M u sic. C o u r s e s a r e a lso o ffe r e d le a d in g t o c e rtific a t e s a n d d ip lo m a s in T h e o lo g y, M u s ic, E x p r e s s io n a n d A r t, C o m m e r c ia l S cie n ce, A c a d e m y, a n d E v a n g e lis t ic S in g in g. REGISTRATION AND SCHOLARSHIP M A T R I C U L A T I O N N e w s tu d e n ts a r e re q u ir e d to m a k e fo r m a l a p p lic a t io n f o r a d m is s io n to th e C o lle g e. I f th e s tu d e n t is fr o m a n o th e r s c h o o l, t h e r e m u s t be c r e d e n t ia ls o f h o n o r a b le d ism issa l. In o r d e r t o s e v e r h o n o r a b ly c o n n e ctio n w it h th e C o lle g e, sh ou ld a s tu d e n t fin d it n e c e s s a r y to le a v e b e f o r e th e c o m p le tio n o f a g iv e n c o u r s e, t h e r e m u st b e e v id e n c e o f th e fu lfillm e n t o f a ll th e o b lig a t io n s, a n d th e fin a l p e r m is s io n o f th e P r e s i d e n t. R E G I S T R A T I O N S tu d e n ts sh o u ld, u p o n e n t e r in g, file w it h th e R e g is t r a r a d e ta ile d s ta te m e n t o f p r e p a r a t o r y w o r k w it h c r e d e n tia ls f o r a d m is s io n, a s re q u ir e d in th e v a r io u s s c h o o ls a n d d e p a r t m e n ts o f th e C o lle g e. A ll s tu d e n ts r e g is t e r o n T u e s d a y o f t h e fir s t w e e k o f e a c h se m e s te r. F r o m 8 :3 0 A. M. to 5 :0 0 P. M. is th e tim e f o r r e g u la r r e g is t r a t io n. A n e x tr a fe e o f o n e d o lla r w ill be c h a r g e d f o r r e g is t e r in g o u t o f th e r e g u la r tim e. A s f a r a s p o s s ib le r e g is t r a t io n sh o u ld b e a c c o r d in g to a r e g u la r co u rse. M a tu r e stu d e n ts w h o a re n o t p u r s u in g a r e g u la r c o u r s e o f s tu d y, b u t p u r e ly e le c tiv e w o r k, w ill b e co n s id e r e d as u n cla s s ifie d. A l l stu d e n ts w ill r e g is t e r a t th e b e g in n in g o f e a ch s e m e s te r f o r th e c o u r s e s to b e p u r s u e d d u r in g th e se m e ste r. S tu d y lists p r o p e r ly a p p r o v e d m u st b e re tu rn e d to th e R e g is t r a r b y th e s e co n d S a t u r d a y o f e a c h sem ester. 21

25 O l iv e t C o llege N o c h a n g e s m a y b e m a d e in s tu d y lis ts e x c e p t b y p e t i t io n in g th e C o m m itte e on R e g is tr a t io n a n d C la s s ific a tio n, su ch p e titio n s t o b e p re s e n te d in w r it in g to t h e R e g is t r a r. P e titio n b la n k s f o r th is p u r p o s e w ill be p r o v id e d u p o n r e q u e st. T h e r e w ill be a n e x tr a c h a r g e o f f i f t y ce n ts f o r ev e i y c h a n g e in r e g is tr a t io n a f t e r th e s e c o n d S a t u r d a y o f e a ch se m e ste r. T h e p e tit io n m u st h a v e th e a p p r o v a l o f th e I n s t r u c t o r a n d th e s ig n a tu re o f th e R e g is t r a r b e f o r e it w ill b e con sid ered b y the com m ittee. N o stu d e n t w ill be p e rm itte d to r e g is t e r f o r a n y c o u r s e i f, in t h e ju d g m e n t o f th e in s tr u c t o r in c h a r g e, h e la c k s su fficie n t p r e p a r a t io n to u n d e r ta k e th e w o r k. I n th e c o lle g e s, s ix te e n h o u r s w h ic h m e a n s s ix te e n p e r io d s o f r e c it a t io n a w e e k, w it h a t le a s t tw o h o u r s o f p r e p a r a t io n f o r e a ch p e rio d t h r o u g h o u t th e s e m e s te r c o n stitu te a sem ester s w ork. In th e A c a d e m y, t w e n t y -t w o h o u r s t h a t is f o u r, fiv e h o u r s u b je c ts a n d tw o h o u rs B ib le c o n s t itu te a s e m e s te r s w o r k. A c a d e m y stu d e n ts w ill n o t be a llo w e d to t a k e m o re th a n fo u r m a jo r s u b je c t s w it h o u t p e tit io n t o th e C o m m ite e o n R e g is tr a t io n. N o r e g u la r c o lle g e s tu d e n t w ill b e a llo w e d to r e g is t e r f o r le ss th a n fo u r t e e n, o r m o re th a n t w e n t y h o u r s, in c lu d in g B ib le, w it h o u t p e titio n to C o m m itte e on R e g is t r a t io n. A n y o n e t a k in g m o re th a n e ig h te e n h o u r s in c lu d in g B ib le in a r e g u la r c o u rse in th e C o lle g e s m u s t p a y f o r th e sa m e. S C H O L A R S H I P A r e c o r d o f a tte n d a n c e a n d s c h o la rsh ip is k e p t f o r e a ch s tu d e n t. A t th e clo s e o f each se m e ste r a r e p o r t is g iv e n o f th e s tu d e n t s cla s s s ta n d in g an d in c lu d in g a r e c o r d o f th e stu d e n t, o r se n t to th e p a r e n t o r g u a r d ia n, s h o w in g a b se n ce s fr o m re q u ir e d e x e r c is e s a n d fr o m ch a p e l. T h e a lp h a b e tic a l s y ste m o f g r a d in g p r e v a le n t e ls e w h e re in th e sta te is u sed. T h e lo w e s t p a s s in g g r a d e is D. S tu d en ts a r e m a rk e d c o n d itio n e d o r in c o m p le t e i f t h e r e r e m a in s w o r k w h ic h m a y be m a d e u p u p o n th e s t u d e n t s in itia tiv e. Failure n e c e s s ita te s a r e p e t itio n o f th e cla ss w o r k b e f o r e c r e d it ca n b e a llo w e d. 22

26 O l iv e t C o llege S tu d e n ts a r e e x p e c t e d to a tte n d a ll c la ss e x e r c is e s f o r w h ic h t h e y a r e r e g is t e r e d u n le ss p r o p e r ly e x c u s e d b y th e P r e s id e n t a n d th e in s t r u c t o r in c h a r g e. In o r d e r to m a in t a in a h ig h s ta n d a r d o f s c h o la r s h ip, a n I n s t r u c t o r m a y w it h th e a p p r o v a l o f th e P r e s id e n t e x clu d e f r o m h is cla s s e s a n y s tu d e n t w h o s h o w s m a r k e d d e lin q u e n c y in a t te n d a n c e, o r w h o n e g le c ts h is w o r k, o r w h o p r o v e s in c o m p e t e n t to p u r s u e th e co u rse. U n d e r c e r t a in p r e s c r ib e d c o n d itio n s a s tu d e n t m a y b e g r a n t e d th e p r iv ile g e o f s p e c ia l e x a m in a tio n s in o r d e r to r e m o v e d e fic ie n c ie s, b u t su ch e x a m in a t io n c a n n o t he a llo w e d m e r e ly f o r th e p u r p o s e o f im p r o v in g th e g r a d e a lr e a d y r e c e iv e d. A s p e c ia l fe e o f $1.00 is c h a r g e d f o r a ll e x a m in a t io n s g iv e n o u ts id e th e r e g u la r sch ed u le. R U L E S G O V E R N I N G A B S E N C E S R e q u e s ts t h a t a b s e n ce s b e e x c u s e d m u s t b e p r e s e n te d to th e D e a n. N o t ic e o f e x c u s e s g r a n t e d f o r cla s s a b sen ce s m u st b e p re s e n te d to th e I n s t r u c t o r in c h a r g e o f th e c o u r s e, b y th e s tu d e n t th e fir s t d a y h e is in c la s s a f t e r h is a b sen c e. F a ilu r e to do th is m a k e s th e a b se n ce in e x c u s a b le. I n ca s e a s tu d e n t a llo w s th e n u m b e r o f u n e x cu s e d a b s e n c e s in a n y c r e d it c o u r s e to eq u a l th e n u m b e r o f h o u r s o f r e c it a t io n in t h a t c o u r s e p e r w e e k, h e sh a ll b e c ite d to a p p e a r b e f o r e t h e D e a n. In ca se o f o n e a d d itio n a l u n e x cu s e d a b s e n ce, th e s tu d e n t s h a ll a u to m a t ic a lly b e d r o p p e d fr o m th e cla s s. T h r e e ta r d in e s s e s sh a ll b e c o u n te d a s o n e a b sen ce. I f m o r e th a n t w e lv e a b s e n c e s e x c u s e d o r u n e x cu s e d fr o m a C o lle g e c la s s, o r fifte e n fr o m a n A c a d e m y c la s s, o c c u r n o c r e d it w ill b e a llo w e d f o r th e c o u rse. I f a s tu d e n t k n o w s h e w ill h a v e to b e a b sen t, re q u e s t f o r e x c u s e sh o u ld b e m a d e b e f o r e th e a b se n ce o c cu r s. A b s e n c e s fr o m c la s s o r c h a p e l o n th e d a y im m e d ia te ly p r e c e d in g o r f o llo w in g a s ch e d u le d h o lid a y o r v a c a t io n p e r io d w ill b e c o u n te d a s tw o a b sen ce s. A ll a b s e n c e s fr o m cla s s e s a n d c h a p e l a r e r e p o r t e d to t h e D e a n w e e k ly. I n a ll c a s e s stu d e n ts m u s t se cu re th e ir e x c u s e b la n k s f r o m th e D e a n a n d a f t e r r e c e iv in g h is s ig n a tu r e th e e x cu se 23

27 O l iv e t C o lleg e m u s t b e p re s e n te d t o th e I n s t r u c t o r o r M o n it o r in c h a r g e, w h o w ill th e n r e tu r n th e b la n k t o th e D e a n. T E S T S A N D E X A M I N A T I O N S T e s ts m a y b e g iv e n a t th e e n d o f e v e r y s ix w e e k s, o r a t su ch tim e a s m a y be ch o sen b y th e I n s t r u c t o r. R e g u la r e x a m in a tio n s a r e g iv e n a t th e e n d o f e a ch se m e s te r. T h e se m e ste r g r a d e is m a d e u p b y a v e r a g in g th e d a ily w o r k, th e te s ts, th e r e q u ir e d n o te b o o k w o r k, c o lla t e r a l r e a d in g, o r p a p e r, a n d th e se m e ste r en d e x a m in a tio n s. G O V E R N M E N T A N D D I S C I P L I N E T h e g o v e rn m e n t o f th e C o lle g e is u n d e r th e d ir e c t c o n t r o l o f th e P r e s id e n t. D is c ip lin e is a d m in is te re d b y h im in c o n ju n c t io n w it h th e A d m in is t r a t iv e C o u n cil o f th e f a c u lt y, w h ic h is a d v is o r y to th e P re s id e n t. S O C I A L L I F E O n e c a n n o t w e ll e s c a p e b e in g in s o c ie ty. I t is p a r t o f a n e d u c a tio n to le a r n to c o n d u c t o n e s s e lf c o r r e c t ly in th e p r e s e n c e o f o th e r s. Y o u n g m e n a n d y o u n g w o m e n sh o u ld k n o w h o w to r e s p e c t a n d t r e a t o t h e r s p r o p e r ly, a n d e a c h to k e e p h is o r h e r r ig h t p la c e. A m e r e fo r m a l e tiq u e tte m a y b e cold, b u t on e w h o h a s n o t le a r n e d c o r r e c t m a n n e rs is b u t p o o r ly e d u ca te d. T h is c a n n o t b e le a r n e d b y th e s t u d y o f ru les alone. W e h a v e n o d e s ire to k ill th e p u r e s o c ia l in s tin c t, b u t seek to t r a in it r ig h t ly b y p r o p e r r e s tr ic tio n a n d d ir e c t io n. T h e y o u n g m en a n d y o u n g w o m e n a r e t o g e t h e r in th e cla s s r e c it a t io n, th e d in in g r o o m, a n d m o s t o f th e r e lig io u s s e r v ice s, a n d a r e r e q u ir e d to b e p o lite a n d r e s e r v e d. A n o c c a sio n a l s o c ia l e v e n in g is h e ld u n d e r th e c a r e o f th e F a c u lt y. C h r is tia n c o u r te s y is m o s t e s s e n tia l to th e s u cc e s s o f th e C h ris tia n w o r k e r, a n d is a t t r a c t iv e a n d d e s ira b le in e v e r y w a lk o f life. F r e q u e n t ta lk s a r e g iv e n o n p r o p e r b e h a v io r in th e v a r io u s s itu a tio n s in w h ic h o n e m a y be p la c e d. W e seek to m a in ta in a n a tm o s p h e re o f c u ltu r e, re fin e m e n t, a n d e a se, t h r o u g h o u t th e In s titu tio n. T h e C o lle g e a im s to c r e a te a n d c o n s e r v e a w h o le s o m e s o c ia l a tm o s p h e r e. S tu d e n ts w ill b e e x p e c t e d t o o b s e r v e th e o r d in a r y u s a g e s o f p o lite s o c ie ty a n d w ill r e f r a in fr o m 24

28 Oliv e t C ollege su ch a s s o c ia tio n s a s w ill a t t r a c t a tte n tio n. Y o u n g m e n w ill n o t v is it th e y o u n g la d ie s in t h e ir r o o m s, in th e d o r m ito r ie s o r in a n y p r iv a t e p la c e, n o r h a b it u a lly a c c o m p a n y th e m to a n d fr o m s e r v ic e s, a b o u t th e c a m p u s, o r e ls e w h e re. T h is is r e q u ir e d o f a ll stu d e n ts, a n d n o t a lo n e o f th o s e r o o m in g in th e d o r m ito r ie s. A b r i e f lis t o f r e g u la t io n s is p o s te d in e a ch s t u d e n t s r o o m. S T U D E N T O R G A N I Z A T I O N S T h e C o lle g e s u p p o r ts a n u m b e r o f o r g a n iz a t io n s w h ic h a ffo r d o p p o r t u n it y f o r r e c r e a t io n a n d t e a m in g in a lit e r a r y, m u s ic a l, a n d p h y s ic a l w a y. A ll stu d e n ts a r e e x p e cte d to b e co n n e cte d w it h s o m e o r g a n iz a t io n in t h e C o lle g e f o r s p e c ia l t r a in in g, p a r t ic u la r ly in p u b lic m in is t r y. A ll th e s e o r g a n iz a t io n s a r e u n d e r th e o v e r s ig h t o f th e F a c u lt y, b u t u n d e r th e im m e d ia te m a n a g e m e n t o f th e stu d e n ts th e m se lv e s. Literary Societies T h e s tu d e n t w h o h a s g o n e t h r o u g h c o lle g e w it h o u t th e p r iv ile g e o f a lit e r a r y s o c ie ty o r d e b a t in g c lu b h a s lo s t a v a lu a b le c h a p t e r o u t o f h is life. T h e r e fin in g in flu e n ce s, th e e a se o f p o s tu r e b e f o r e a n a u d ie n ce, th e a b ilit y to th in k a n d e x p r e s s o n e s s e lf o n th e flo o r, th e p a r lia m e n t a r y d rill, th e r e s e a r c h, a n d th e d rill in E n g lis h, in th e w r it in g o f t h e e s s a y a n d o r a t io n, a n d m a n y o th e r in flu e n c e s a n d p r a c t ic e s o f su ch o r g a n iz a t io n s, r e n d e r th e m in d is p e n s a b le t o th e b e s t r e s u lts o f a s tu d e n t s life. T h e r e a r e t h r e e L it e r a r y S o c ie tie s in O liv e t C o lle g e t h e P h ila th e a n, th e A la t h e a n, a n d th e P h ila d e lp h ia n L it e r a r y S o c ie tie s. Publications In a d d itio n to th e r e g u la r illu s t r a t e d c a t a lo g u e o f th e C o lle g e, a s t a ff e le cte d b y th e s tu d e n ts e a ch y e a r, a n d u n d e r th e s u p e r v is io n o f th e fa c u lt y, e d it a n d p u b lis h a n a n n u a l b o o k, c a lle d T h e A u r o r a. T h e 1921 e d i t io n re a c h e d o n e th o u s a n d co p ie s. R E L I G I O U S L I F E W h ile O liv e t C o lle g e is u n d e r t h e c a r e o f th e C h u rch o f t h e N a z a r e n e, it is n o t n a r r o w ly s e c ta ria n. M e m b e rs o f m a n y d iffe r e n t e v a n g e lic a l c h u rch e s a r e e n r o lle d in th e I n s tit u t io n a n d a ll e n jo y t h e sa m e p r iv ile g e s a n d o p p o r t u n i 25

29 O l iv e t C o llege tie s. W e h o ld t h a t t h e r e ca n b e n o t r u e e d u c a t io n o r c u lt u r e w it h o u t t r u e r e lig io n. T h e C o lle g e p u r p o s e s, t h e r e fo r e, to p r o m o t e a v ita l s p ir it u a l l i f e a m o n g th e stu d e n ts, a n d to m a in t a in th e h ig h e s t C h r is tia n s ta n d a r d s o f liv in g a n d t h o u g h t. N u m e r o u s a g e n cie s e x is t to s e cu re th is en d. The Chapel Services T h e s e a r e h e ld e v e r y s c h o o l d a y f o r fo r t y - fiv e m in u te s ju s t b e f o r e n o o n. W h ile w h o le s o m e a n d c u lt u r a l s u b je c ts m a y b e p re s e n te d a s o c c a s io n p e r m its, it is in te n d e d in th e m a in to m a k e th is h o u r o n e o f s p ir it u a l r e fr e s h in g. V is it o r s fr e q u e n t ly a d d re s s th e s tu d e n ts in th ese s e r v ice s. M a n y tim e s d u r in g th e p a s t y e a r th e S p ir it h a s b een o u tp o u r e d in s p e c ia l b le s s in g u p o n th e a n d fa c u lt y. stu d e n ts Revivals A s p ir it u a l a tm o s p h e re p e r v a d e s th e C o lle g e d u r in g th e e n tire y e a r. T h e r e a r e u s u a lly t w o se a s o n s o f r e v iv a l e ffo r t in w h ic h t h e s e r v ic e s o f s u c c e s s fu l e v a n g e lis ts a r e e n g a g e d, a n d th e L o r d v is its th e s c h o o l in t id e s o f s a lv a tio n. S o m e tim e s th e r e v iv a l b u r s ts f o r t h s p o n ta n e o u s ly a n d n u m b e rs a r e b r o u g h t in to s a lv a tio n o r c a lle d in to th e h a r v e s t field. Missions T h e s u b je c t o f M is s io n s h a s a lw a y s h e ld a la r g e p la c e in O liv e t. T h is s p ir it o f m is s io n s is b e in g in te n sifie d t o a m a r k e d d e g r e e. D u r in g t h e p a s t y e a r a n u m b e r o f y o u n g m e n a n d y o u n g w o m e n h a v e o p e n e d t h e ir h e a r t s an d r e ce iv e d s p e c ia l ca lls to th e f o r e ig n field. T h e r e a re n o w a b o u t s e v e n ty stu d e n ts in th e C o lle g e lo o k in g fo r w a r d to fo r e ig n se r v ice. W e h a v e a n e n e r g e t ic S tu d e n t M is s io n B a n d w h ic h h o ld s s e r v ice s on S u n d a y a fte r n o o n s. A n e ff o r t is m a d e to h a v e a s m a n y w o r k e r s fr o m th e F ie ld a s p o s s ib le v is it th e C o lle g e to g iv e in fo r m a t io n a n d in s p ir e in t e r e s t in th is lin e o f C h r is tia n se rv ice. Regular Sunday Services T h e r e is S u n d a y S c h o o l in th e C o lle g e C h a p e l e a ch S u n d a y a t 9 :3 0, fo llo w e d b y p r e a c h in g s e r v ic e a t 1 0 :4 5. T h e r e is a n e v a n g e lis t ic s e r v ic e in th e e v e n in g a t 7 :0 0. T h e r e is a lso a r e g u la r c h u rch p r a y e r m e e t in g on W e d n e s d a y e v e n in g a t 7 :0 0. T h e s e s e r v ic e s a re u n d e r th e d ir e c t io n o f th e C o lle g e p a s t o r, a n d in th e m s t u d e n ts, fa c u lt y, a n d c itiz e n s w o r s h ip t o g e t h e r fr e e ly. A t t e n d a n ce u p o n S u n d a y s e r v ice s e ith e r a t th e C o lle g e o r e ls e w h e re is re q u ir e d o f a ll s tu d e n ts. 26

30 Oliv e t C o llege Student Prayer Bands T h e s e m e e t tw o e v e n in g s e a ch w e e k f o r p r a y e r, d e v o tio n, a n d p r a is e. T h e M is s io n a r y P r a y e r B a n d s m e e t d u r in g th e n o o n h o u r o n T u e s d a y a n d F r id a y. Opportunities for Preaching and Religious Work T h e r e a r e m a n y p o in t s n e a r th e C o lle g e w h e re th o s e w h o fe e l c a lle d t o p r e a c h a n d t o do h o m e m is s io n a r y w o r k c a n fin d o p e n d o o rs. S o m e c h u rch e s a r e w it h o u t p a s t o r s, a n d o th e rs h a v e little o r n o p r e a c h in g. N e a r b y m in in g t o w n s a n d s e ttle m e n ts p r e s e n t g r e a t n e e d s a n d o p p o r t u n it ie s. I n t e r u r b a n c a r s r u n in s e v e r a l d ir e c t io n s fr o m D a n v ille, c o n n e c t in g w ith m a n y o t h e r p o in ts. In a d d itio n th e Olivet Gospel Band h a s a n a u to tru ck, s e a t in g fifte e n p a s s e n g e rs, a n d th is is o u t n e a r ly e v e r y S u n d a y d u r in g th e s ch o o l y e a r, t a k in g h e lp to n e e d y c h u rch e s. I N S T R U C T I O N S T O B O A R D I N G S T U D E N T S The Dining Hall A ll b o a r d in g stu d e n ts, u n less f o r s a tis f a c t o r y r e a s o n s th e P re s id e n t a llo w s o th e r a r r a n g e m e n ts, w ill b o a r d in th e C o lle g e D in in g H a ll. W e p u r p o s e to g iv e g c o d w h o le s o m e fo o d, su fficien t in q u a n tity, a n d a t a lo w e r r a t e th a n ca n be fu r n is h e d in p r iv a t e h o m e s. T h e d in in g r o o m is n o t m e r e ly a p la c e to g e t s o m e th in g t o e a t, b u t is a ls o a p la c e o f re fin e m e n t in s o c ia l c o n v e r s a t io n, t a b le e tiq u e tte a n d g e n e r a l co u r te s ie s. I n s tr u c t io n in th e se s o c ia l a r t s w ill be g iv e n fr o m tim e to tim e. Student s Outfit S tu d e n s w ill b r in g th e ir o w n b e d d in g in c lu d in g o u t e r c o v e r in g, b la n k e ts, t w o p a ir s o f sh eets, tw o p illo w ca s e s, a p illo w, f o u r to w e ls, c o m fo r t, co m b, b r u s h e s, soa p, n a p k in s, n a p k in r in g s, r u g s, d r a p e r ie s a n d o th e r h o m e lik e fu r n is h in g s f o r th e ro o m s. In e a c h liv in g r o o m t h e r e is a w a r d r o b e, ta b le, d re s s e r, w a s h -s ta n d, b e d a n d m a ttr e s s, c h a ir s, w a s h b o w l, p itc h e r s, e tc. T h e d o r m ito r ie s a r e c o m p le te in e q u ip m e n t, c o m fo r t a b le, a n d c o n v e n ie n t in e v e r y r e s p e ct. T h e d o r m it o r y is a r e a l h o m e f o r th e stu d e n t. Dormitory Regulations S tu d e n ts a re r e q u ir e d to c a r e f o r th e ir o w n r o o m s, a n d m u s t o b s e r v e th e o r d in a r y r u le s o f th e D o r m it o r y, a c o p y o f w h ic h w ill b e p o s te d a t t h e o p e n in g o f th e s c h o o l y e a r. S tu d e n ts u n d e r fo u r t e e n y e a r s o f a g e w ill n o t b e a llo w e d in th e d o r m it o r y u n le ss su ch s tu d e n ts h a v e h ig h -s c h o o l sta n d in g. 27

31 O l iv e t C o llege Dress Regulations Students should not bring an extensive or elaborate wardrobe. Young women will not bring dresses o f immodest or extravagant style. Plain and serviceable clothing is more desirable. They will dress in simple attire, with ample skirts, and waists with full length sleeves. All materials used are to be of sufficient texture to prevent any exposure of the body. Graduating costumes also are to be simple and inexpensive. Non-conspieuous dress is enjoined upon all. Laundry We have a steam laundry for what is commonly known as home washing. The prices are very reasonable and the laundry furnishes work for a number of girls who make part o f their expenses in that way. For finer laundry work, such as collars, cuffs, men s dress shirts, etc., there is a college agent who handles such at regular prices. Book Store The College book store is in the Administration Building. All text-books used may be had there, as well as stationery, tablets, pencils, pens, inks, erasers, postcards, stamps, pennants, etc. Students should arrange to pay cash for what they purchase at this store. Student Employment Bureau The College will not undertake to furnish remunerative employment for all students to help pay their way while in the College. Only cases of real need can be considered and then for only part o f the expenses. No student should come without money to pay at least the amount o f his board. GENERAL EXPENSES The following is an itemized statement for a regular College course for one semester (one-half year) : Fees: Registration $ 1.00 Incidentals 1.00 Medical 2.00 Library 2.00 Tuition Board Room Heat and Light Laundry T otal $

32 O l iv e t C o llege M a x im u m a llo w a n c e f o r r e g u la r c o u r s e 17 h o u r s lite r a r y w o r k, 3 h o u r s B ib le. T h e A c a d e m y o r B ib le S c h o o l e x p e n s e s w ill b e $5.50 le ss p e r se m e ste r. T h e e x p e n s e s f o r th e e n t ir e y e a r, c o n s is t in g o f in c id e n t a ls, r e g is t r a t io n, m e d ic a l, a n d lib r a r y fe e s, b o a r d, r o o m (t w o in a r o o m in d o r m i t o r y ), t u it io n, lig h t, h e a t a n d p la in la u n d r y (t w e lv e p ie c e s p e r w e e k ), is $ A c a d e m y o r B ib le D e p a r tm e n t, $ M a x im u m, 20 h o u r s w o r k. P r ic e o f b o a r d s u b je c t to c h a n g e i f a d v a n c e in e a ta b le s b e c o m e n e c e s s a ry. R E G U L A R E X P E N S E S M a t r ic u la t io n fe e, o n ce f o r a ll u p o n e n t e r in g $ 5.00 R e g is t r a t io n fe e, p e r s e m e s t e r R e g is t r a t io n fe e, la te, p e r s e m e s t e r I n c id e n t a l fe e, p e r s e m e s t e r M e d ic a l fe e, p e r s e m e s te r L ib r a r y f e e C o lle g e t u it io n, p e r s e m e s t e r T e n h o u r s tu it io n o r le ss, p e r s e m e s te r h o u r M o r e th a n th e r e g u la r c o u r s e, p e r se m e ste r h o u r, e x tr a 2.00 S in g le m e a l s.30 Note: Students can only receive rooms alone with the understanding that if the necessity arises they will have to change to sharing their rooms with a roommate. M U S IC (P ia n o, V o ic e, V io lin ) O n e se m e s te r, 36 le sso n s, u n d e r h e a d o f d e p a r t m e n t --$ O n e s e m e s te r, 36 le sso n s, u n d e r a s s is t a n t O n e s e m e s te r, 36 le s s o n s, u n d e r s e co n d a s s is t a n t P ia n o r e n t (o n e h o u r p e r d a y ) f o r s e m e s t e r P ia n o r e n t (t w o h o u r s p e r d a y ) f o r s e m e s t e r S ig h t S in g in g a n d N o t a tio n C la ss, p e r s e m e s t e r 5.00 H is t o r y o f M u s ic, C la ss, p e r s e m e s t e r H a r m o n y C la s s, p e r s e m e s t e r C o u n te r p o in t C la s s, p e r s e m e s t e r A d v a n c e d C o m p o s it io n C la s s, p e r s e m e s t e r C o r n e t, T r o m b o n e, C la r in e t, S a x o p h o n e, F r e n c h H o r n o r o t h e r b a n d o r o r c h e s t r a l in s tr u m e n ts b y s p e c ia l a r r a n g e m e n t. 29

33 O l iv e t C ollege E X P R E S S I O N T w o le sso n s p e r w e e k (in c l a s s ), p e r s e m e s t e r $15.00 O n e le sso n p e r w e e k ( p r i v a t e ), p e r s e m e s t e r T w o lesson s p e r w e e k ( p r i v a t e ), p e r s e m e s t e r A R T O n e le sso n p e r w e e k (in c la s s, 2 h o u r s ), p e r s e m e s te r $ O n e le sso n p e r w e e k (p r iv a t e, 1 h o u r ), p e r s e m e s t e r T w o le sson s p e r w e e k ( p r i v a t e ), p e r s e m e s t e r C O M M E R C I A L D E P A R T M E N T S h o r th a n d, p e r s e m e s t e r $25.00 T y p e w r it in g, p e r s e m e s t e r S h o r th a n d an d t y p e w r it in g c o m b in e d, p e r s e m e s t e r B o o k k e e p in g ', p e r s e m e s t e r C o m b in e d co u r s e, B o o k k e e p in g, S h o r th a n d, T y p e w r it in g, a lso a n y o th e r s tu d y on e sh o u ld d e s ire to t a k e U se o f t y p e w r it e r, p e r s e m e s t e r 7.50 L a b o r a t o r y S P E C I A L F E E S C o lle g e P h y s ic s, B io lo g y o r Z o o lo g y, p e r s e m e s t e r._$ C o lle g e C h e m is try, p e r s e m e s t e r 3.50 A c a d e m y P h y s ic s o r B io lo g y, p e r s e m e s t e r 2.00 S p e cia l e x a m in a tio n in a n y s tu d y, e a c h 1.00 E a c h c h a n g e (d r o p o r t a k e ) in r e g is t r a t io n a f t e r seco n d w e e k.50 C o lle g e g r a d u a t io n 5.00 S h eep sk in D i p l o m a A t C o st A c a d e m y a n d B ib le C o lle g e D ip lo m a 3.50 M u sic, E x p r e s s io n, C o m m e r cia l o r s p e cia l c e r t ific a t e 3.00 (P a y a b le w h e n a p p lic a t io n is m a d e f o r d e g r e e o r c e r t ific a t e ). T E R M S A c o n t r a c t b e tw e e n th e C o lle g e an d its p a t ro n s is e m b o d ie d in the fo llo w in g s tip u la tio n s, w h ic h sh o u ld be c a r e f u lly r e a d : 1. C h a rg e s a re d u e in a d v a n c e f o r e a ch h a l f s e m e ste r. P a t r o n s n eed n o t w a it f o r b ills, a s t h e y k n o w in a d v a n c e, fr o m th e p ric e s in th e c a t a lo g u e a n d fr o m th e lis t o f su b je c t s w h ic h th e y a u th o riz e to be ta k e n, w h a t th e b ills w ill 30

34 Ol iv e t C o llege b e. S en d m o n e y in a d v a n c e o r b y th e stu d e n t. T h o s e w h o a r e u n a b le to p a y ca s h in fu ll, in a d v a n c e, sh a ll m a k e a r r a n g e m e n t s a t th e B u s in e s s O ffice f o r th e p r iv ile g e o f su b s t it u t in g b a n k a b le n o te s in th e p la c e o f th e re q u ir e d ca sh p a y m e n t. 2. N o m a tte r w h a t th e r e a s o n, a s tu d e n t s r e m a in in g a w a y fr o m w o r k f o r so m e tim e is n o t o n ly d is a d v a n t a g e o u s, b u t c a u s e s e x t r a tro u b le a n d la b o r f o r t e a c h e r s. W h ile w e d o n o t c h a r g e e x tr a f o r th is a d d itio n a l w o r k a n d tro u b le, w e c a n n o t a c t so u n r e a s o n a b ly a s to e n c o u r a g e a b sen ce b y m a k in g d e d u ctio n s o r r e fu 'n d in g m o n e y f o r it. H o w e v e r, p a t r o n s p a y in g ca s h in a d v a n c e f o r th e h a lf-s e m e s t e r m a y co u n t o n th e fo llo w in g lib e r a l s e ttle m e n t in ca s e o f s e r io u s illn e s s m a k in g n e c e s s a r y (a c c o r d in g to th e a d v ice o f th e C o lle g e p h y s ic ia n, th e s t u d e n t s p e rm a n e n t w it h d r a w a l: A c a lc u la t io n o f e x p e n s e to su ch tim e w ill b e m a d e, a n d b e y o n d a p r o r a t a c h a r g e f o r th e p r e c e d in g p o r t io n o f th e se ss io n, th e b a la n c e o f th e m o n e y p a id f o r b o a r d w ill be r e fu n d e d a t th e e n d o f th e s e m e s te r, p r o v id e d th e tim e lo s t is m o re th a n a m o n th a n d p r o v id e d fu r t h e r t h a t th e s tu d e n t is s till u n a b le to re tu rn. S tu d e n ts a r e r e ce iv e d o n ly f o r a s e m e s te r o r th e r e m a in in g p a r t o f a se m e s te r, u n le ss s p e c ia lly a r r a n g e d o th e r w is e. 3. E a c h s tu d e n t w ill b e re q u ir e d to d e p o s it $2.50 a t th e o p e n in g o f e a c h se m e ste r to g u a r a n t e e r e c o v e r y o f d a m a g e s t h a t fu r n it u r e in th e ir r o o m s m a y s u ffe r, in c lu d in g b o w ls, p itc h e r s, sh a d e s, e le c tr ic lig h t g lo b e s, etc. R o o m s w ill be in s p e c te d a t th e clo se o f e a ch s e m e s te r a n d b r o k e n fu r n it u r e re p la c e d. W h e n k e y is r e tu rn e d, a n d in c a s e a ll fu r n it u r e is in t a c t, th is f e e w ill be r e fu n d e d. 4. B o o k s, p e n c ils, s t a t io n e r y, a n d o th e r stu d e n t su p p lie s w ill b e fu r n is h e d f o r ca s h o n ly. N o n e o f th e se th in g s w ill, in a > y in s ta n c e be c h a r g e d. P a r e n t s sh o u ld d e p o s it a t le a s t $10.00 to c o v e r c o s t o f b o o k s, e tc., o r s u p p ly stu d e n ts w it h c h a n g e f o r th is e x p e n se. 5. N o fe e w ill be r e fu n d e d. 6. N o tu it io n w ill be r e fu n d e d. In c a s e o f sic k n e ss o f f o u r w e e k s o r m o r e w h e n th e s tu d e n t h a s to d ro p o u t o f a s e m e s t e r s w o r k, a n o n -t r a n s fe r a b le d u e -b ill w ill be g iv e n f o r th e u n e x p ir e d tim e. 31

35 O l iv e t C o llege 7. N o d e g r e e s w ill b e c o n fe r r e d n o r c r e d it s t r a n s fe r r e d u n til a ll fin a n c ia l o b lig a t io n s to th e C o lle g e h a v e b e e n a r r a n g e d. COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES T h e C o lle g e o f A r t s an d S cie n c e s, a n d th e B ib le C o lle g e a r e c lo s e ly a llie d, so t h a t a lim ite d in t e r -c h a n g e o f c r e d it s is p o s s ib le. W h ile th is is tru e, th e c o u r s e s o f s t u d y in th e C o lle g e a re d is tin c t a n d it is in te n d e d t h a t t h e y s h a ll c o n s titu te a b r o a d fo u n d a t io n f o r su b se q u e n t p r o fe s s io n a l t r a in in g, a t th e sa m e tim e p r o v id in g a t r u e C h r is t ia n c u lt u r e. R E Q U I R E M E N T S F O R A D M I S S I O N S tu d e n ts w ill b e a d m itte d t o th e C o lle g e, a f t e r p r e s e n t in g s a t is fa c t o r y t e s tim o n ia ls o f c h a r a c t e r, in f o u r w a y s : R e g u la r F r e s h m a n b y th e fir s t tw o. 1. Admission by Certificate C a n d id a te s f o r a d m is s io n to F re s h m a n s t a n d in g m a y p re s e n t c e r t ific a t e s fr o m a n a c cre d ite d H ig h S ch o o l o r A c a d e m y, s h o w in g th e s tu d ie s p o s se ss e d, tim e d e v o te d to e a ch s u b je c t, a n d t h e g r a d e a t ta in e d in e a ch. T h e r e co m m e n d a tio n o f th e P r in c ip a l f o r th e a d m is s io n o f th e c a n d id a te to th e C o lle g e is d e s ira b le. 2. Admission by Examination E x a m in a t io n s f o r s t u d en ts p r e s e n t in g th e m se lv e s w it h o u t c e r t ific a t e s o f s c h o la r s h ip a r e h e ld o n th e d a y p r e c e d in g th e o p e n in g o f th e fir s t te rm. 3. Admission to Advanced Standing S tu d e n ts f r o m o t h e r in s titu tio n s s e e k in g a d m is s io n t o a d v a n c e d s t a n d in g in th e C o lle g e m u s t p r e s e n t e v id e n c e o f h o n o r a b le d is m is s a l fr o m th e In s tit u t io n la s t a tte n d e d, a n d a c e r t ific a t e s t a t in g t h e p r e v io u s s ta n d in g a n d w o r k a c c o m p lis h e d. o th e r in s titu tio n s g iv e n a d v a n c e d s t a n d in g in th is S tu d e n ts fr o m C o lle g e m a y n o t b e co m e ca n d id a te s f o r a s c h o la s tic d e g r e e u n til a f t e r th e c o m p le tio n o f o n e y e a r in re s id e n ce. 4. Admission as Special Students M a tu r e s tu d e n ts m a y be a d m itte d a s s p e c ia l stu d e n ts t o s u ch c o u r s e s a s in th e ju d g m e n t o f th e h e a d s o f th e D e p a r tm e n t s t h e y m a y p u r s u e w it h a d v a n t a g e. S u ch s tu d e n ts a r e n o t c la s s ifie d 32

36 O l iv e t C o ll e g e and will receive no credit toward a degree until entranee conditions are removed. Of the fifteen units required for admission, the following six units, constituting List A, are prescribed for admission to the Freshman class in all the undergraduate curricislum o f the College. LIST A PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS Units English (Composition and Literature) Algebra Plane Geometry 1 Laboratory Science LIST B ELECTIVES Latin 1-4 Greek French German Spanish English (4th u nit), Advanced Algebra Solid Geometry Trigonometry History 1-3 Civics 1-1 Economics 1-1 Astronomy Geology 1-1 General Science 1 Theology 1-1 Botany 1-1 Physics 1 Chemistry 1-2 The remaining units, to the extent of not more than three, may be chosen from List C. The subjects indicated in this list must have been taught in approximation to the requirements of the High School Manual o f the University o f Illinois. 33

37 O l iv e t C o ll e g e LIST C ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES Bookkeeping Business Law Commercial Arithmetic. Music Shorthand-Typewriting. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION General College Requirements Each candidate for a college degree must meet all requirements with respect to registration and residence, and credit in approved courses must be secured amounting to one hundred twenty-eight hours. The hour is the unit o f credit and should be equivalent to one class period a week for one semester. Each hour is understood to represent for the average student one hour o f class work and two hours of preparation. In laboratory courses, a two hour period is considered the equal of one hour recitation or lecture period. 2. Prescribed Work Candidates for all College degrees must secure a minimum o f ten hours o f credit in each o f the following groups, excepting Biblical History and Literature, in which only eight hours are required: A. '-English Language, Literature. B. Foreign Language. C. History, Political and Social Science. D. Mathematics, and Philosophy. E. - Natural and Physical Science. F. -Education and Economics. G. VBiblical History and Literature, eight hours. 3. Major Requirements Not later than the opening of the Junior year each candidate is required to select some subject as his major. A major consists o f courses amounting to at least twenty hours, chosen from one Department or closely allied Departments, and approved by the faculty of the College. The subjects at present recognized as majors in this college are: English, Modern Language, Ancient Language, Mathematics, Social and Political Science, Philosophy, Education, History, Physical and Natural Science, Biblical History and Literature. 34

38 O l iv e t C o llege 4. Minor Requirements Each candidate must offer in addition to his major a minor or not less than eight hours in one subject. 5. Electives A sufficient number of electives may be chosen to make up the one hundred and twenty-eight hours required for graduation. Not more than forty hours in any one subject may be counted for graduation. DEGREES 1. Requirements for the A.B. Degree The A.B. degree (Classical) requires a subject major in Ancient Language o f twenty hours in addition to the prescribed language requirement of ten hours, either Ancient or Modern. The A.B. degree (Literary) requires a subject major in English of twenty hours in addition to the general requirements of a minor in Modern Language o f eight hours. The A.B. degree (Educational) requires a major in Education of twenty hours, in addition to the general requirements, and a minor o f eight hours in Foreign Language. The A.B. Degree (Scientific) requires a subject major in Science of twenty hours, in addition to the general requirement, and a minor o f eight hours in Foreign Language. The A.B. Degree (Philosophical) requires a subject major in Philosophy of twenty hours in addition to the general requirements, and a minor in Foreign Language of eight hours. A candidate may combine the A.B. course, Classical, Literary, Educational, or Philosophical, with Ministerial by electing the thirty hours free electives in the Department o f Biblical Language and Literature, or allied courses o f Seminary grade in the Bible College. This degree is preparatory to graduate work in the Bible College, leading to the B.D. degree. 2. Requirements for the B.D. Degree The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is given upon recommendation of the Graduate Department o f the Bible College to candidates holding the A.B. degree, who have completed the prescribed work in Theology. It may be secured in two years o f graduate study by candidates who have elected thirty hours of Biblical Education during the regular College course.

39 O l iv e t C o l l e g e 3. Requirements for Bachelor of Music Degree Requires two years of College work completion of course in Theory and Composition, and Individual recitals. The larger concert works of Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, and modern composers are offered. The technique must be fully developed and dependable. 4. Minor Requirements Each candidate must offer in addition to his major a minor of not less than eight hours UNDERGRADUATE STANDING LOWER DIVISION STANDING Freshmen are given regular standing when the College entrance requirements are fully met. Students may enter College conditionally with fourteen units credit, but such students will be given provisional standing until all conditions are removed. Sophomore standing is given to regular students who complete thirty hours o f College work. The student will ordinarily choose his major subject at the beginning o f the Sophomore year, but in no case may this be deferred later than the beginning o f the Junior year. UPPER DIVISION STANDING Junior standing requires sixty hours of credit. The Junior certificate will be given to all regular students who have completed the prescribed work of the lower division and in addition a sufficient number o f electives to make a total of sixty hours. Students may not register for upper division courses until the requirements of the lower division are fully met. Senior standing requires ninety hours o f credit. Sixteen hours of prescribed work in the upper division must be completed before the close o f the senior year, as follow s: Biblical Literature, 4 hours; Philosophy, 6 hours; either History or Language, 6 hours. The thesis, which forms a part o f the work of the senior year should be completed and in the hands o f the major professor not later than the thirtieth week. Electives are to be chosen in consultation with the major professor. 36

40 O l iv e t C o llege SCHOLASTIC HONORS In addition to the one hundred twenty-eight hours required for graduation, it is required that the student have at least one hundred twenty-eight scholastic credits based upon the quality of work performed. These credits are determined as follows: 1. For every grade of B - - or above, 3 credits. 2. For every grade o f C-j- or above, 2 credits. 3. For every grade of C or above, 1 credit. Students receiving a total o f 360 credits or more will be graduated with highest honors (summa cum laude). Students receiving a total o f 300 credits or more will be graduated with honors (magna cum laude). Students receiving a total o f 240 credits or more will be graduated with honor (cum laude). DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION Courses o f instruction here offered are divided into Lower and Upper Division work. Lower Division Courses are numbered Upper Division Courses from 100 on. The prescribed work in the lower division must be completed before upper division courses are undertaken. The courses offered are grouped as follows: I. Department o f Biblical History and Literature. II. Department of English Language and Literature. III. Department o f Ancient Language and Literature. IV. Department o f History. V. Department of Mathematics. VI. Department of Modern Languages. VII. Department o f Education and Social Science. VIII. Department o f Science. IX. Department o f Philosophy and Psychology. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE All candidates for degrees are required to elect eight hours from this department (See Bible College). Others may be elected. See requirements for graduation. 37

41 O l iv e t C o ll e g e DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 0. Preparatory English MR. McCLAIN A course in English Composition designed for the benefit of those desiring preparatory work in principles and mechanics c f structure. Freshmen may be transferred to this course to remove deficiencies in fundamentals such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling. No credit is given. Three hours, both semesters. 1, 2. Rhetoric and English Composition A study of rhetoric, and practice in the writing o f English. Accuracy and soundness of structure will be emphasized. Personal conferences will be given. Text, Manual, Readings, Discussions, and Themes. Required of all College Freshmen. Three hours, both semesters. 3, 4. A Survey of English Literature Lectures on movements and historic influences; Class study and discussion from selected master pieces; the cultivation of a real appreciation for literature is sought in this course. Prerequisite to succeeding courses in literature. Required of Sophomores. Three hours, both semesters. 100,101. American Literature The first semester will be given to introducing the history o f American Letters, with attention to the growth of National Ideals. Study of poetic masterpieces. Second semester, study o f American prose masters. Extensive reading, reports, and discussions. Three hours, both semesters. 102.* English Poets Study of special periods. Extensive and intensive reading. Papers on author and age. Three hours, first semester. 103.* The English Novel A survey o f the development of the English novel during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a critical study of a few selected masterpieces and rapid reading o f others. Three hours, second semester. 38

42 O l iv e t C o llege 104. English and American Essayists An analytic study of the essay through the works of leading English and American Essayists. Three hours, first semester Argumentation and Debate Principles o f argumentation, and practice in the delivery of debate. Three hours, second semester English Literary Criticism A study of types and forms. Original analytic reviews. Lectures and discussions of literature as art. Readings and reports. Open to advanced students. Two hours first semester Contemporary Poetry A study of the new poetry as to form, subject matter and aim. Application o f accepted methods of critical analysis. Designed for advanced students. Prerequisite English 106. Two hours, second semester Advanced Composition Principles and methods o f literary expression with an intensive study of exposition. Practice in writing essays, editorials and reviews. Prerequisite English 1 and 2. Two hours, first semester. Study o f the simple narrative, with special attention to the short story. Themes, readings and discussions. Prerequisite English 1 and 2. Two hours, second semester. 110, 111.* Nineteenth Century Poetry A study o f selected masterpieces, with extensive readings. Reports and discussions. Two hours, both semesters. Note: *Not given in DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE MRS. PEAKE, MR. STAHL Why study dead languages? Because they still live. Forming the warp and woof o f our language and literature of to-day, these tongues of antiquity continue their thread o f interest to us. We can not forget them we should not. 39

43 O l iv e t Co ll e g e Rather, we should elect to quaff the elixer of literary life at their classical source. It is our purpose to show the secret springs of inspiration to young aspirants. We strive to read un-translatable thoughts, and to sense the soul o f times and things as they used to be. The world o f language is yet ours in the rich legacy of its literature. 1. Elementary Greek GREEK 2. Xenophon Book I o f the Anabasis is completed. In addition Books II, III and IV, together with a small portion o f Homer, are read. Five hours, both semesters. One hour of this is given to prose composition New Testament Greek Prerequisites: Greek 1 and 2. Matthew, Mark, Acts, Romans, I and I Corinthians, Galatians and Ephesians will be read in , and the remainder o f the New Testament in the following year. Special attention will be given to etymology of English words coming from the Greek. Five hours, both semesters Homer White s First Year Text Book is used. This will be completed, and a portion of the first book of the Anabasis will be read. Particular attention will be given to grounding in the fundamentals o f syntax. Much translation work. Portions of Scripture memorized. Five hours, both semesters. Iliad, Book I, selections from remaining books. Special attention given to scansion and to the Homeric period. Lectures and translation. Three hours, both semesters. 3. Cicero LATIN The usual Four Orations, with selections from numerous others; careful study o f the Author as a man, a statesman, an author and a Roman; outside research work, original compositions on Roman character, Personal Influence, etc.; critical review of entire Grammar, Prose Composition 40

44 O l iv e t Co llege {advanced) ; selections memorized, including portions o f the Latin Bible. Three hours, both semesters. 4. Vergil Four or six books; daily study and practice o f scansion; literary merits of the work thoroughly examined; contemporary history focused on the Poem; the Poem as a whole, as a world masterpiece; its plot, plan, purpose, prophecy its moral; Grammar briefly reviewed; Composition continued; Mythology; Latin Scriptures compared and memorized. Three hours, both semesters Latin Vulgate Its origin, history, importance; reading of select portions of the Old Testament (from Psalms, Isaiah, etc.), and entire New Testament; rapid reading, critical study of choice selections, considerable memory work, special Grammar, Idioms. Two hours, both semesters Livy Other Latin Classics will be taught if demanded; Cicero s Philosophical Essays, Vergil s shorter poems, Sallust, Ovid, Seneca, Livy, Horace, Tacitus, Pliny; advanced Grammar and Composition. The purpose o f such study is true appreciation of Masterpieces, as types and models, influenced and understood by Epoch, Environment, Nation, Personality. Two hours, both semesters. 1. Greek History DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY MR. GREER A survey of Greek history of the earliest times to the death o f Alexander. Attention is given to the institutions and civilization of the Greeks, and their influence upon later civilization. Elective in College. Two hours, first semester Roman History A course covering the development of Rome from foundation o f city to the year 476 A. D. Attention is given to the institutions and civilization o f Romans, and their influence upon later civilization. 41

45 O l iv e t C o llege Elective in College. Two hours, second semester Medieval History A general survey of the Medieval period with special reference to the development o f Church and State. Textbook, readings, and reports. Three hours, first semester Early Modern History A course covering the field o f European history from fifteenth century to the Congress of Vienna. Attention to the Renaissance after which consideration is given to the courses which weakened the old church, and prepared the way for revolt; the Protestant Revolution; and counter Reformation. Two hours, second semester History of the United States The object o f this course is to give the student a thorough understanding of the development o f the American nation. Emphasis is placed upon political, social and economic life. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Required o f all college students who have not had courses in American History and Civics. Three hours, first semester History of the United States A continuation of Course 101 from 1850 to the present time. Special attention is given to sectional forces, problems of Civil War reconstruction, and recent problems of domestic and foreign policy. For Juniors and Seniors. Required same as 101. Three hours, second semester English History- A history of England and Great Britain from the Anglo- Saxon period to the present time. Special attention given to social and religious movements and to political and constitutional development. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Two hours, both semesters Europe since the Congress of Vienna The subject matter of this course deals with the chief social, industrial, political, and religious movements of the 19th Century. 42

46 O l iv e t College Elective in College. Two hours, second semester The World War This is a continuation o f Course 105 and is a survey of the history of Europe in order to find the causes of the War, after which, the outbreak, progress and cessation o f war are studied. Emphasis is then placed upon economical reconstruction and post war problems. Elective in College. Two hours, second semester ,108. Church History A course intended primarily for students of Theology and history majors. Three hours, both semesters. (See Historic Theology). 109, 110. Missions Before the Reformation I l l, 112. Three hours, both semesters. (See Missions). The History o f Christian Doctrine Three hours, both semesters. (See Historic Theology). DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 1. Plane Trigonometry MR. PRICE, MISS BAUERLE Topics: Generalization of Angles, Trigonometric Functions and Formulae, Theory and Use of Tables, Solution of Right and Oblique Triangles, (with applications to Problems o f Physics and Surveying), Inverse Functions, Trigonometric Equations. Text: Passano s Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Three hours, first semester. 2. College Algebra Topics: Theory of Exponents, Graphical Representation o f Linear and Quadratic Functions, Mathematical Induction, Determinants, Logarithms, Series. Text: Reitz and Crathorne s College Algebra. Three hours, second semester Analytic Geometry Graphical Representation of Points and Curves in a Plane, Deteim'nation of the Properties and Relations of Plane Curves by a study of their Equations and Graphs. The Straight Line and the Conic Sections are fully invest! gated. The course includes an introduction to Analytic 43

47 O l iv e t C o ll e g e Geometry of three dimensions. Text: Wilson and Tracey s Analytic Geometry. Three hours, first semester Introduction to Differential and Integral Calculus Differentiation and Integration of Functions, with the usual Algebraic, Geometric and Mechanical Applications. Prerequisites 1 and 2. Text: Phillips Calculus. Three hours, second semester. DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE MRS. PEAKE, MRS. BURKHOLDER, MISS ANDERSON FRENCH 1. First Year This work consists of the usual First Book, with its Pronunciation, Inflection, and Grammatical Principles; Vocabulary is stressed; selections are memorized; easy reading and written work are mastered; daily conversation drill is given; portions of the Bible are read and memorized. Three hours, both semesters. 2. Second Year Grammar is reviewed and increased; letters, themes, and note-books are written; outside work is gathered into reviews; several Classics are read and studied; extracts from prose, poetry, and the Bible are memorized. Threehours, both semesters Third and Fourth Years Take up the Masterpieces of Literature, analyzing and memorizing choice selections; conversation and writing are stressed; note-books review, all work; vocabulary is increased; selections are memorized; the Bible is studied. This work is directed toward any special objective desired by the class Literary, Historical, Philosophical, or Theological. College requirements are met. Two hours, both semesters. 1. First Year SPANISH Grammar is thoroughly studied, and reviewed constantly ; much easy reading is done; conversation and memory 44

48 O l i v e t C o ll e g e drills are frequent; Spanish newspapers are read, and portions o f the Bible are required. Three hours, both semesters. 2. Second Year Various and varying annotated texts are read, chosen from different types of Literature, and numerous Authors, portraying life, scenery, and character in the many Spanishspeaking countries. Grammar, conversation, composition, and Bible are continued. 3,4. Third and Fourth Years Work is given to those electing Spanish as a major. This work consists o f more extensive reading o f the gems o f Spanish Literature; History, Geography, Religion furnish themes for research. Speaking and writing make familiar the idioms. Any special line of thought may be chosen as objective. Bible required. Two hours, both semesters. GERMAN This Language is coming back to its own. There can be no doubt of its value, in business and education. We offer a Four Years Course. 1. First Year Alphabet, Script, and Phonetics; Grammar; oral and written exercises; translation; composition, memory work. Three hours, both semesters. 2. Second Year Easy and interesting Classics; modern texts of travel and customs; songs and conversations; memorizing o f poems and Bible selections; composition. Three hours, both semesters Third and Fourth Years This work will be given upon demand. This will be a continuation of Grammar, Composition, Conversation; translation o f the best works of the German Authors; outside reading, and College requirements will be met. Two hours,, both semesters. 45

49 O l iv e t C o llege DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCE MR. SANFORD, MRS. PEAKE, MR. GREER 1. The A rt of Study The text treats of the factors of study in a way quite different from all previous writers upon the subject, also teaching how to study. Students taking this course are expected to apply the principles of the book in mastering it, thus using their knowledge as fast as it is acquired. The course is valuable to any student whether planning to teach or not. Three hours, first semester. 2. History of Education Beginning with the earliest times and extending to the present time a survey of a number o f the educational classics. Three hours, first semester. 3. Introduction to Psychology (See Philosophy and Psychology 1). 4. The Psychology of Education The general psychology of the learning processes with application to problems of the teacher and learner. Child development, problem of the exceptional child, mental measurements, moral education. Three hours, second semester. 5. Principles of Economics A comprehensive introduction to economic studies, based upon a recent text, lectures, collateral reading and student exercises. Three hours, first semester. 6. Introduction to Sociology A comprehensive study of social progress with illustrations drawn continually from concrete and current conditions. An introductory course giving a survey of the field of Sociology. Three hours, second semester School Administration The problems of the school room and school administration; the nature and end of the school organism; the relation of Uacher and board, teacher and superintendent or principal, teacher and parents, teacher and students. Two hours, first semester. 4(5.

50 O l iv e t C o l l e g e 102. Secondary Education History and present status of secondary education, high school organization, curriculum building, the junior and senior high school problems, the high school as a supervised center, and the general principles o f high school instruction. This course is intended to give those preparing for high school principalships, or teaching, a clear understanding of the problems which will confront them, and how they are being met. Three hours, second semester Principles of Education A study of the foundation principles which underlie the art of teaching. Application in the field of primary and secondary teaching. Philosophy 1 is prerequisite. Three hours, first semester Educational Tests and Measurements This course will treat the derivation o f scales and their use in education; the study o f some o f the important educational surveys; and the application of this knowledge to some practical problems o f educational method and administration. Two hours, second semester Social Psychology (See Philosophy and Psychology 104). DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY MR. SANFORD, MRS. PEAKE, MR. GALLOW AY 1. Introduction to Psychology. A text book in psychology. Lectures, collateral reading, elementary experiment, and demonstrations. The course will deal with the normal mental life. The different viewpoints o f modern Psychology will be emphasized. Special reference will be made to leading Psychologies, such as Pillsbury, Angell, Judd, Royce, Titchner, and James. Three hours, first semester. 2. Elementary Logic A study of the inductive and deductive aspects of reasoning with application to practical problems. The course aim's toward the training of the student in correct habits of thought. Two hours, first semester. 47

51 O l iv e t C o llege 3. Ethics A comparative study of current and classical ethical theories, the general nature and principles of moral conduct, and an application of the results to present problems of individual and social life. Illustrative material from the teaching o f New Testament writers. Textbook: Dewey and Tufts, Ethics. Two hours, second semester Histor-y of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy The leading system of thought during the times of the early Greeks, the early Christian Philosophy, and the medieval schools. Special emphasis will be laid upon the systematic and later ethical periods, with the problems that concern the Christian student. Three hours, first semester Histovy of Modern Philosophy A survey of Modern thought from Bacon and Descartes to Damon and Spencer. Attention will be given to the theories of evolution and their relation to religion and science, and the tendencies of modern thought. Three hours, second semester Educational Psychology (See Education and Economics 5) Social Psychology An introductory course, gives the physiological approach. Deals with the social instincts, suggestion, imitation, suggestibility, the crowd, leadership, public opinion, social control, and social progress. Three hours, first semester Philosophy o f Religion (See Philosophy and Christian Sociology 101). 1, 2. Botany DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE MR. STOKE The course includes text, field, and laboratory work, on the lines of plant histology, physiology, and morphology. Open to those who have had work in elementary botany. Text book of Botany for Colleges, by Ganong. Three hours, both semesters. 48

52 O l iv e t Co llege 3,4. General Chemistry For beginners in Chemistry, comprising a study o f all the fundamental laws and reactions; with laboratory work. Newell s Inorganic Chemistry for Colleges. Three hours, both semesters. Not given in , 6. Zoology The principal facts of animal structure, development and classification. Laboratory work and outside reading will form an important part o f the course. Parker-Haswell s Manual of Zoology. Three hours, both semesters. 7, 8. Astronomy General descriptive astronomy, embracing a study of the form, motion, size, constitution, and relation of the heavenly bodies. Some work will be done in observation. Young s Manual of Astronomy. Two hours, both semesters. Not given in , 102. Geology A study of the important minerals, rocks, and the general features o f the surface of the earth along with constructive and destructive forces, acting upon it. Attention will be given to the Biblical record of geological facts in its relation to historical geology. Scotts Introduction to Geology. Two hours, both semesters. Not given in Advanced Physics Mechanics and heat, including the study of mechanical force, inertia, elasticity, hydromechanics, heat, fuels, engines, etc. Duncan s Mechanics and Heat. Five hours, first semester Advanced Physics Fundamental laws o f electricity and magnetism, X-rays, and wireless transmission, with laboratory work. Special attention is given to the practical application. Jackson s Elementary Electricity and Magnetism. Five hours, second semester. 105,106. Analytical Chemistry A laboratory course in both qualitative and quantitative analysis o f simple compounds and mixtures. Newth s Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis. Three hours, both semesters. 49

53 O l iv e t C o ll e g e 107,108. Organic Chemistry The more important classes o f carbon derivatives covering the allopathic and aromatic series. Remsen s Organic Chemistry. Three hours, both semesters. THE BIBLE COLLEGE MR. SANFORD, MR. GROSE, MR. GALLOW AY, MRS. PEAKE Olivet Bible College aims to furnish to persons o f both sexes, who seem to be divinely called to the Christian Ministry, Christian Work, or Mission Field, an adequate Spiritual and intellectual training to enable its graduates to successfully meet the numerous responsibilities and exacting duties of their sacred calling as Spiritual leaders in this enlightened age. The ideals o f the school are: A firm insistence upon those vital and experimental Bible doctrines, which are emphasized by the Holiness movement; a clear knowledge of personal salvation; such a mastery o f the present day Ministerial problems, such a knowledge o f the Bible, and such a training in practical things as will help the graduate to be an efficient leader, a forceful preacher, and a successful soul-winner. Olivet Bible College holds to the divine inspiration of the whole Bible. It invites students who wish to avoid the awful poisonous influence o f destructive Higher Criticism. It offers work under two general divisions A, courses leading to degree. B, Special Courses. A DEGREE COURSES 1. B. D. Course This course is open to graduates of Colleges of recognized rank. The Degree of Bachelor o f Divinity will be conferred upon those completing the prescribed course. Ninety semester hours are required for graduation. Those who have been credited with Theological work on their literary degree, may offer the same as credit towards the Theological degree, but such credit shall not exceed 50

54 Oliv e t C ollege thirty hours. Students from other Theological Seminaries, whose work is the equivalent o f our work, will be allowed credit for the same, but shall be required to do at least one year of resident work before they will be permitted to graduate. 2. A. B. Course This course is open to graduates of accredited High Schools or Academies. This is the regular four-year course in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, leading to an A.B. Degree with a Theological Major of twenty-eight semester hours, chosen from courses in the Bible College. By offering this work toward a B.D. Degree the student may complete a four-year College Course and a three year Seminary Course, receiving the A.B., and B.D. degrees in six years. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION The courses offered by the Bible College constitute eight groups as follows: I. Old Testament Language and Literature. II. New Testament Language and Literature. III. Historical Theology. IV. Systematic Theology. V. Practical Theology. VI. Philosophy and Christian Sociology. VII. Apologetics and Archaeology. VIII. Missions. I. OLD TESTAM ENT LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Ten courses are offered in Old Testament covering the entire book, about three offered each year varying from year to year. Courses 105 to 110, 3, 4, 7 and 8 use the English Bible and Teacher s Synopsis, with reference material for class study. 1, 2. History and Literature of Israel In this course Israel s history and literature are studied together since they are so intimately related. The world empires with which Israel had relations together with the civilization from which it sprang are studied as a part o f this course. Two hours, both semesters. 51

55 O l iv e t C ollege 3, 4. Studies in Old Testament Characters In the study o f these great characters the spiritual truths will be emphasized and an effort made to inspire lofty ideals. Much sermon material may be gathered from this. Teacher s Synopsis is used. Two hours, both semesters. 5, 6. Hebrew Ritual A general study of the Hebrew idea o f worship, the altar, offerings, sacrifices, tabernacle, and temple. Two hours, second semester. 7, 8. Old Testament Pentateuch Synthetical studies of the first books o f the Bible. Also fundamental principles o f Bible study and topical truths will be covered with Teacher s Synopsis. Two hours, both semesters. 101,102. Hebrew This is a study of the elementary principles, forms, and structure of the language. It is studied inductively. It is not required for graduation, but students are urged to elect it ; (1) Because it has collateral value. (2) Because it is necessary to the most intelligent use o f Commentaries. (3) Because it gives an insight into the original meaning o f the Scriptures. (4) Because it is a good foundation for thorough Biblical Scholarship. Three hours, both semesters. 103, 104. Advanced Hebrew Selected readings from the historical, prophetical, and poetical books o f the Old Testament. Two hours, both semesters. 105, 106. Prophetic Literature The Minor Prophets and Isaiah. This is a delightful study o f these great prophets, together with an exegetical study of the prophetic books. Two hours, both semesters. 107, 108. Prophetic Literature A continuation of the Prophetic Literature in Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel. Two hours, both semesters. 109, 110. Poetical Books of Old Testament General characteristics o f Hebrew poetry and a study of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song o f Solomon. Two hours, both semesters. 52

56 Ol iv e t C o ll e g e 111. Principles of Interpretation General Principles o f Interpretation, and the special principles that have to do with the Old Testament. Two hours, first semester. II. NEW TESTAM ENT LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. The entire New Testament is covered with these courses. Some three or more offered each year, varying according to the needs of the students. Courses 5, 6, 7 and 104 to 112 study English Bible with Teacher s Synopsis and reference material. 3, 4. Neiv Testament Greek Epistles and Life of Christ (See Ancient Language and Literature 3, 4). 5, 6. Synthetical Studies in the Gospels The relation o f the Gospels to each other and their characteristic differences will be noticed. Each book will be studied as a whole, also by chapters. Attention will be given to the origin, design, authorship, and Messianic element in each. Two hours, both semesters. 7. A cts A careful study will be made o f the conditions under which the Christian Church began its existence and its methods of propogating the Gospel. Two hours, second semester. 101, 102. New Testament Introduction Assigned readings and discussions on the origin, authorship, contents, structure, and specific design of the books of the New Testament. Two hours, both semesters Principles of Interpretation- The specific principles which affect the interpretation o f the New Testament Scriptures. Two hours, first semester. 104, 105. The Pauline Epistles A study o f the Epistles of Paul, with brief exegetical Commentary upon them, a survey o f Paul s Theological positions, style, and vocabulary. Two hours, both semesters Miracles and Parables of Jesus A careful study o f the miracles and parables recorded in the Gospels, and the lessons they teach. Two hours, second semester. 53

57 O l iv e t C o llege 107. Introduction to the Johannine Writings A study of the fourth Gospel, the Epistles of John, and the Apocalypse. Two hours, one semester The Life and Teachings of Jesus A study of the more important problems connected with the life o f Jesus, and an exposition of His teachings. Two hours, first semester The Life of Paul Advanced studies in the Life of Paul, harmonizing the Acts of the Apostles with the Pauline Epistles. Two hours, one semester. III. HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. The aim o f this Department is to cover as far as possible the entire field of Church History, emphasizing decisive epochs and matters of living interest; and a general view of the History of Doctrine will be presented in connection with these courses. Two or more o f these courses offered each year. 1. Church History to the Reformation A survey of the outstanding happenings in the life of the Church from the Apostolic Age to the Reformation. Three hours, first semester. Required. 2. The Reformation and Modern Church A survey of the history of the Christian Church from tlm Protestant Revolution to the present time, including a study of the great Forward Movements of the Modern Period. Three hours, second semester. Required History of Christian Doctrine A study o f the rise, development and constructive characteristics of Methodism. Two hours, first semester History of Christian Doctrine A survey of the fundamental doctrines of the New Testament together with a study of the rise and growth of the creeds. Two hours, second semester The Early Church An interesting study o f the early Christian literature. The church fathers before the Nicean Council. Two hours, one semester. 54

58 O l iv e t C o llege IV. SYSTEM ATIC THEOLOGY AND CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE. The aim of this Department is to set forth in an orderly way the great truths o f the Christian faith. A special effort will be made to set forth the truth as experimental and vital rather than speculative and theoretical. The practical aim will be to give a strong grasp of the great truths that make up the message o f the preacher. Several courses will b-1 se'ected from this group each year according to the needs o f the students. 1, 2. An Introduction to Theology This course is designed to set forth the fundamental problems of Theology. It considers: (1) The nature of religion; (2) The truth of Christian religion; (3) The nature, source, and method o f Theology; (4) Doctrines o f the Bible, correlated with the study o f the Church Manual. Two hours, both semesters. 3. Immortality and the Future An interesting study o f the subject of Eschatology. Some o f the best literature on the subject will be examined. Three hours, first semester. 4. Theology of Holiness The doctrine of Christian Perfection as taught by Wesley, Hill and Walker. Three hours, second semester. 101, 102. Systematic Theology A study o f God, Revelation, Trinity, Deity of Christ, Man, origin and fall, benefits o f Atonement, personality and office o f the Holy Spirit, the Church and Eschatology. Three hours, both semesters. 103,104. Research in Systematic Theology A scientific study o f the great doctrines of Theology. With text and much outside research in Theological literature for advanced work. Three hours, both semesters The Doctrine of the Person of Christ An inquiry into the leading theories o f Jesus Christ with a view to establishing the true doctrine of Christ as a divine Teacher and Savior. Three hours, first semester. 55

59 O l iv e t C o llege 106. The Trend of Modern Theology The aim of this course is to show the trend of Modern Theological writers and arm our preachers against the dangers of modern thought. Three hours, second semester. V. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. In this Department attention is given to the theory of preaching, practice in sermon structure, and the relation of preaching to pastoral work. Several of these courses are offered each year. 1. Homiletics The fundamental principles and methods o f sermon construction, text, outline, theme, development, application, types o f sermons. Practice will be given by having the students construct sermons upon assigned themes and texts. This will also include the study o f the elements of effective preaching. Three hours, first semester. 2. Pastoral Theology A study of the significance o f the pastoral office; the personal problems o f the pastor; the pastor as a citizen; his devotional, his study, church finance, his relation to the Sunday School, the prayer meeting, and pastoral visitation. Required. Three hours, second semester. 3. Church Polity A study of church organizations and government with special reference to the polity o f the Church o f the Nazarene. Two hours, one semester. 4. Expression (See Department of Expression). 5. Sunday School Administration A study o f the organization and history o f the Sunday School. This including a survey o f the principles of teaching, which may be used in the Sunday School, also practice teaching before the class. Two hours, second semester. 6. Christian Workers' Applied A rt Class A Christian Workers course in the study o f illustrations suitable for Sunday Schools, Children s and Young People s Meetings, Missionary and Temperance services, and Vacation Bible Schools.

60 O l iv e t C o llege Principle elements of Drawing, Lettering, Acrostics, Chalk Talks, Object Lessons, Charts, Map Drawing and Sand Table illustrations. Two hours, both semesters Vocal and Literary Interpretation of the Bible (See Department of Expression) Evangelism A study of Jesus, the apostles, and preeminent church leaders in search for types and methods of evangelistic promotion, including a survey of great evangelistic movements. Two hours, one semester. VI. PHILOSOPHY AND CHRISTIAN SOCIOLOGY. 101, 102. Theism and Philosophy of Religion A careful examination of the leading theories of the ultimate nature o f reality, the reconstruction of a correct theistic conception and philosophy of religion, with special reference to the teaching and utterances o f Jesus on the nature o f God, man, sin, salvation, death, the future, etc. A reverent and careful investigation of the mental processes involved in the modes of religious experience, normal and abnormal. Three hours, both semesters Ethics (See Philosophy and Psychology 3) The Church and Modern Social Problems A study o f the problem of population, Psychic problems of population groups, of population movements, problems of social organization, and problems of social meliorism. Two hours, first semester. VII. APOLOGETICS AND ARCHAELOGY. 1. Christian Evidences The evidences upon which the Christian Religion rests. Texts and References. Two hours, one semester Ground of Theistic Belief Modern philosophical views are examined concerning their bearing upon Christianity. Three hours, one semester Fallacies in Modern Theology The aim o f this course is to arm our preachers against the trend o f modern thought in Higher Criticism and false heresies. Three hours, second semester. 57

61 O l iv e t C o llege 103. Problem of the Old Testament A refutation o f the modern critical theories concerning the Old Testament. Dr. James Orr, text. Three hours, first semester Old Testament Archaeology The results of recent research in Babylonia, Egypt and the Bible lands that establish the history given in Bible. Three hours, first semester New Testament Archaeology Light upon the Language, times and history o f the New Testament as found on recently discovered Greek Papyri Manuscripts and buried cities. Three hours, second semester. VIII. MISSIONS. Olivet College is intensely Missionary. Many o f the students enrolled last year had a call to the Mission field. The aim of this Department is to give special training along Missionary lines to those who are called as Missionaries in the home or foreign fields. 1, 2. History of Christian Missions An attempt to trace the extension of the Christian religion from the beginning of the movement to the present, laying special emphasis on the missionary enterprise o f the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Two hours, both semesters. 3,4. Missionary Survey A study of the various mission fields, both foreign and home. Two hours, both semesters. 5, 6. Comparative Religions This is a study of the non-christian religions of the world. Two hours, both semesters Factors and Methods in Missionary Work As adapted to the different fields. semester Study of Special Fields Two hours, second semester. Two hours, first 58

62 O l iv e t C o llege B SPECIAL COURSES This Department has been instituted for those who are not able to take the degree courses, yet wish to get a practical Bible Training that they may be as useful and efficient as possible in the Master s vineyard. We are taking care of these eleventh hour laborers, by giving them courses suited to their needs. ENGLISH BIBLE COURSE This three years course is open to all students who are able to carry the work. It will cover the subjects and meet the requirements for ordination of the licensed ministers in the Church of the Nazarene, and other helpful work. Ninety semester hours are required for graduation. All graduates who complete this course will be given a diploma. They may complete it in two years as some o f it is academy work. By electing part o f it in academy as granted in the Theological Academy, the academy and English Bible course may be completed in five years. The required reading course will be correlated with these subjects and given under teacher s supervision. SUGGESTED OUTLINE First Year First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. English I 5 English I 5 Int. Theology 2 Theology o f Holiness 3 Church Polity 2 Missions 2 Missions, or Elective _ 2 Old Testament _ 2 Old Testament 2 New Testament 2 New Testament 2 Sunday School Administra Reading Course No. 1 tion _ 2 Second Year First Semester Hrs Second Semester Hrs. English II 5 English II _ 5 Church History 3 Church History 3 Homiletics 2 Pastoral Theology 2 Theo. or Chr. Evidence 3 Theo. or Chr. Doctrine 3 New Testament 2 New Testament 2 Reading Course No. 2 Reading Course No. 3 59

63 O l iv e t C o llege Third Year First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. English Literature 5 English Literature 5 Psychology 3 Argumentation, or Elective 2 Systematic Theology Systematic Theology 3 Expression 2 Expression 2 New Testament. _ 2 New Testament 2 Reading Course No. 4 THEOLOGICAL ACADEMY This course is provided for the ministers who wish to take theological work along with their high school studies. It consists of the regular high school course with the exception that one subject (5 hours) is omitted each year from the elective literary subjects, and five hours theological work with the Bible substituted each year instead. Otherwise the same requirement must be met for graduation. (See High School). Academy students and those taking the Special Bible Courses may register for the courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the Bible College, or the following Special Courses: I. Foundation Bible Study A general study of the Bible, what it is, how we get it, how to study it, and a survey of the great dispensations, and Bible Memory Drill. Two hours, first semester. II. Bible History The story o f Israel s history, the day o f creation to death of the apostles. Two hours, both semesters. III. Bible Geography and Customs a. The Geography of the Bible lands, map drawing and outlines. b. A study o f Oriental Social life and customs. Two hours, both semesters. IV. Bible Introduction and Doctrine All about the Bible. Its origin, language, translation, symbols, inspiration, alleged errors, plan, etc. Two hours, one semester. CHRISTIAN W ORKERS COURSE Missionaries, local preachers, Sunday School workers, deaconesses and other Christian workers who have not had 60

64 O l iv e t C o ll eg e their academic work and feel they can spend only a short time in school, will find this course designed to their needs. It may vary according to the needs of the individual. Sixty semester hours may be covered in two years. This course is composed principally o f English, Bible, Theology and other lower division subjects from the Bible College. Subjects in nursing may be elected. MINISTERS CORRESPONDENCE COURSE Olivet Bible College has instituted a correspondence course of interest for ministers who wish to take the regular ministerial course as outlined by the Manual of the Church o f the Nazarene, and who are not able to take the course in residence. Young preachers often find that it is hard to take the Ministers Course without assistance. So it is the aim o f this course to assist the student by questions and instructions, and enable him to complete the course for ordination. The Examining Boards in the Central Educational District will accept the grades of Olivet College without examination. While one year s residence work is required to get a certificate or diploma, yet the student may complete the Ministers Course and be ordained without residence work. A charge of $5.00 will be made for any one study, or $20.00 for one year s course, as outlined by the Manual of the Church of the Nazarene. Write for particulars. DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC MR. BURKHOLDER, Director Olivet College is well equipped for musical work. There are two excellent grand pianos in the chapel, a Steinway and a Mason and Hamlin. There are eight practice pianos, and the studios are well equipped. Complete courses are offered in Piano, Violin, Voice, with Harmony and History of Music, leading to the honors of a Teacher s Certificate, Diploma, and the degree of Bachelor of Music. Work is also offered in Band and Orchestral instruments in connection with their respective organizations. High School credit is given for two units in Music out of a total of sixteen. One of these must be in Harmony or History of Music, or the Composite course embracing these 61

65 O l iv e t C o llege two subjects. The other credit may be applied music, that is Piano, Voice, or Violin, in the third year o f advancement or beyond. College credit is given for sixteen hours total in Music out of the required one hundred twenty-eight. Especial attention is given to the training o f musicians for religious work in each musical course. Evangelistic singing and playing are offered to anyone wishing to prepare for those specialized forms of work. Each member o f the Faculty of Music is thoroughly experienced, and the prices of lessons are considerably less than in other schools o f equal standing. PIANOFORTE COURSE MR. BURKHOLDER, MRS. PRICE, MISS KNOX Teacher's Certificate Course Requires two years High School work and a year o f Harmony and History of Music. The earlier works of Bach, easier sonatas o f Beethoven and Mozart, Nocturnes, Waltzes, and Preludes of Chopin, Mendelssohn s Songs, Compositions of Grieg, McDowell, and others are used. The technique must lead up to the Chopin Etudes. Diploma Course Requires completion of High School and two years of Theory and Musical History. The work offered includes Fugus of Bach, easier Chopin Etudes, and some others Polonaises, Impromptus, Nocturnes, works by Liszt, Sonatas by Mozart, and Beethoven, work by Schumann. Bachelor of Music Course Requires two years of College work completion of course in Theory and Composition, and individual recitals. The larger concert works of Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, and modern composers are offered. The technique must be fully developed and dependable. Public appearance are part of the course and students are expected to take part in ensemble organizations. Special training is given in playing accompaniments and religious music. Anyone may enter the piano department either as a regular or a special student. 62

66 O l iv e t C o llege VOCAL COURSE MISS PETERS, MR. PETERS The courses offered in Voice include sight reading and tone production and lead up to work in Oratorios and Arias o f Standard Classics, for which work is granted the Certificate, Diploma, and degree of B.Mus. (Same general requirements as for piano). Special emphasis is given to the signing o f religious works as well as to the classics. The following subjects are studied as part of the course. 1. The Vocal Organs Their structure and operation illustrated: Larynx, Resonance, Chambers, Articulation. 2. The A rt of Breathing. 3. Tone Production how secured. GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF VOCALIZATION. 1. Breath Control Poise. 2. Flexibility of Voice. 3. Ear Training Intonation. 4. The Minor Mode. 5. Unifying Vowel Sounds. 6. Different Tone Colors. 7. Fundamental Tone Forms. 8. Interpretation of Vocal Music. No pupil will be permitted to take part in any program or service until he has made such progress as will have won the sanction of the teacher. All students registered in the vocal department are required to attend Chorus and Choir. SIGHT SINGING Two years are offered. This is required of regular vocal students. Text used The Melodia. Work is also offered in glee clubs and large chorus. VIOLIN COURSE MR. CAIN The courses for violin have been carefully graded. The beginners course includes special exercises edited by Leopold Auer, whose fame has made him king of violin teachers. 63

67 O l iv e t C o llege Courses are offered leading to Certificate, Diploma, and Bachelor of Music. (Same general requirements as for Piano). Studies by Kayser, Sit, and Wohlfahrt, with compositions of equal difficulty. Third, Fourth, and Fifth Periods: Position studies by Sit, Laouereux, and Schiadieck. Op. I, Part I, by Sevcik; Op. 36 by Mazas; Bowings by Seveik; Scales by Hrimaly. Advanced and A rtist Courses Shiftings and Broken Chord exercises by Sevcik; Bowings over two, three and four strings, by Sevcik; Studies by Kreutzer, Fiorillo, and Rode, Solos by DeBeriot, David, Vieuxtemps, Kreisler, Mendelssohn, etc. Ensemble work for Violin, Viola, and Cello is offered in connection with the Violin course. Guitar, Mandolin, and Banjo are also offered. WIND INSTRUMENTS Band and Orchestra A complete Orchestra and Band are organized yearly and a course in those respective instruments given. Every student sufficiently advanced in such instruments is expected to take part in these organizations. The requirements are musical ability and regular attendance at rehearsals. EXPENSES (Piano, Voice, Violin) One Semester, 36 lessons, under head of department $58.00 One Semester, 36 lessons, under assistant One Semester, 36 lessons, under second assistant Piano rent (one hour per day) for semester 7.00 Piano rent (two hours per day) for semester Sight Singing and Notation Class, per semester 8.00 History of Music Class, per semester Harmony Class, per semester Counterpoint Class, per semester Advanced Composition Class, per semester Cornet, Trombone, Clarinet, Flute, Saxophone, French Horn or other band or orchestral instruments by special arrangement. 64

68 O l i v e t C o l l e g e DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION MR. STAHL This Department does not aim to produce elocutionists^ Artificial, superficial or mechanical methods are not employed. The great purpose o f Expression is so to develop the undreamed-of possibilities, latent in all o f us, that w o shall bring them into rich and glorious manifestation. From, within outward is the great principle. Always impression must precede expression. Being, not seeming, is the great law. Out o f the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh. We do not seek to graduate students who have the form, but who lack the power of thought and feeling. One must live a thing before he can get it. The ease, naturalness, and spontaneity of conversation is taken as a standard. To enter the kingdom o f expression it is necessary that one become as a little child in simplicity, teachableness, and enjoyment of what is done. Expression has five foundations: (1) Correct breathing; (2) Pictorial thinking; (3) Right tone making; (4) A responding body, including the power of relaxation; (5) Vivid realization o f the thought. These are constantly emphasized in this department. A college graduate who is a notable success in his chosen field of labor stated that there is no more important course in the curriculum than Expression. He was right. Expression links the student up with life, and enables him to communicate to others the treasures of wisdom and knowledge that he accumulates in other departments. Many have experienced the wish in the poet s words, Oh, that my tongue could utter the thoughts that arise in me. Expression, as it is taught at Olivet, gives the power to impart to others what we feel in our souls. As a factor in achieving success along any line of endeavor, it cannot be overestimated. The text-books used are those prepared by Dr. S. S. Curry. He was unquestionably the greatest authority on this subject who ever lived. First Year Voice culture; Extemporaneous speaking; story telling, preparation o f readings, to be given in class and in chapel; 65

69 O l iv e t C o llege recitals. Texts: Foundations o f Expressions, Classics for Vocal Expression. Two hours, both semesters. Second Year Vocal training; harmonic gymnastics; pantomime; platform reading; public speaking. Texts: Foundations o f Expression, Mind and Voice. Two hours, both semesters. Third Year Pantomime; Interpretation of Literature, particularly of Shakespeare; Vocal training; oratory. Texts: Imagination and Dramatic Instincts, Mind and Voice. Two hours, both semesters. VOCAL AN D LITERARY IN TERPRETATIO N OF THE BIBLE This is primarily for those who will have occasion to read the Scriptures in public. It deals with the great principles suggested in Nehemiah, So they read in the book of the law o f God distinctly, and gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading. There are opportunities exceedingly great for those who seek to be ministers of the Word in taking this course we offer, and gaining the ability to become a blessing by the reading of the Bible before congregations. With most ministers the need for effectiveness here is immense. Two hours, both semesters. One hour is devoted to a study o f the text-book, and the other to actual work in the reading of the Bible before the class. A diploma in expression will be given only to those who have a high school education or its equivalent. This diploma will not be awarded unless the student manifests a real enthusiasm for the work, with the corresponding disposition to diligence. Merely covering the ground outlines, without showing a devotion to the wondrous art o f the spoken word, will under no circumstances entitle one to graduation. COURSES IN ART MISS SHERMAN Drawing Caste and still life drawing in charcoal. Original work in ink illustration. Lettering and design. 66

70 O l iv e t C o ll eg e Painting Still life and landscape in Water Color or Oil. The principles o f perspective and composition are taught as part o f the work. Private lessons, one per week 50 minutes Private lessons, two per week 1 hr. 40 minutes Class lessons, one per week 1 hr. 40 minutes Class lessons, two per week hrs. 20 minutes HIGH SCHOOL The College High School is under the direction o f the College and is primarily a preparatory school. Besides it is intended to furnish a four-year course of instruction for five classes of students. Those who desire better preparation for undergraduate Theological courses; those who are preparing for technical courses; those who are preparing to become teachers; and those who desire a better preparation for the common walks o f life. These courses have been prepared to meet the general College entrance requirement, and the requirements of the University o f Illinois, by which our work is accredited. By proper selection o f electives students may meet any o f these requirements. ADMISSION Students who present certificates o f graduation from the common schools o f promotion to High Schools are admitted without examination. Those not presenting certificates will be required to take an entrance examination. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION To graduate from the High School 16 units are required (1 unit o f which must be Bible). A unit is the credit given for one year s work in a subject five times a week for at least thirty-six weeks. O f the 16 units required, the five contained in Group A are required o f all. The remaining eleven units may be elected from Group B. 67

71 O l iv e t C o ll e g e GROUP A. Prescribed subjects, five units required of all. Algebra Plane Geometry English Composition English Literature 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 2 units GROUP B The remaining eleven units may be elected from this group: Solid Geometry I unit Trigonometry i unit Commercial Arithmetic 1 unit English Literature 1 unit Latin 1-4 units Spanish 1-4 units French 1-4 units German 1-4 units History 1 unit American History and Civics unit Economics and Economic History h-1 unit Business Law 1 unit Bookkeeping 1 unit Stenography and Typewriting 1-2 units Commercial Geography i-1 unit Chemistry 1-2 units Zoology 1-1 unit Music 1-2 units Drawing 2-1 unit W EIGHTED CREDIT SYSTEM OLIVET HIGH SCHOOL A 1.2 Credit C 1. Credit B 1.1 D.8 F.0 A 1.2 Credit 1. Consistently does more than is required. 2. Has a wide vocabulary at his command. 3. Is always alert and takes an active part in class discussion. 4. Has unusual dependability in taking assignments. 68

72 O l iv e t Co ll e g e 5. Is prompt, neat, thorough in all work and unusually free from teacher s correction. 6. Knows how to use books and is a rapid reader. 7. Has initiative and originality in attacking new problems. 8. Has ability to associate and rethink the problem and can adapt himself to new and changing situations. 9. Has enthusiasm for and interest in the work. 10. Has ability to apply ideas gained in study in everyday life. B 1.1 Credit 1. Frequently does more than is required. 2. Has good vocabulary and has the ability to speak with conviction. 3. Usually alive to the situation at hand. 4. Careful in complying with assignments. 5. Eager to attack new problems and profits by criticism. 6. Prompt, neat, thorough and usually accurate in all work. 7. Has ability to apply the general principles o f the course. C 1. Credit 1. Does what is required. 2. Possesses a moderate vocabulary. 3. Willing to apply himself during the class hour. 4. Does daily preparation with comparative freedom from carelessness but preparation often limited by personal interests. 5. Attentive to assignments. 6. Has ability and willingness to comply with instructions and a cheerful response to correction. 7. Reasonably thorough and prompt in all work. 8. Has average neatness and accuracy in all work. 9. Has ability to retain recollectively the general principles of the course. 69

73 O l i v e t C o llege D.8 Credit 1. Usually does a little less than is required. 2. Attendance often irregular. 3. Listless and inattentive in class. 4. Tools and equipment for work often lacking. 5. Frequently misunderstands assignments. 6. Careless in preparation o f assignments. 7. Willing but mentally slow in complying with instructions and corrections. 8. Lacking in thoroughness and usually tardy with work. 9. Careless in presentation of work. 10. Seldom knows anything outside the lesson. 11. Retains fragments of the general principles of the course. F 0 Credit 1. Lacking in above qualities to the extent that he cannot or will not do the work. ENGLISH I. Grammar, Composition, and Literature This course consists o f a brief, thorough review of English grammar, stressing especially the more important parts o f grammar, as per the minimum requirements as listed by the State Department of English. Elementary work in written and oral composition, sentence, paragraph, and theme structure is studied. Elementary rhetoric is studied. A choice of four or more o f the following classes are to be read in class: Bible stories, Dickens Christmas Carol, The Merchant of Venice, Stories of Old Greece and Rome. Four or more o f the following are to be read for outside work: Oliver Twist, The Odessy, Treasure Island, Lady of the Lake. II. Composition, Rhetoric, and Literature This year s work aims to enlarge the student s knowledge of the various forms of composition: Narration, argu 70

74 O l iv e t C o l l e g e mentation, description, exposition, and persuasion are studied at length. Oral and written composition are required at least once each week. Letter writing must be mastered. A rerview o f figures of speech, verse forms, meters, and accents are studied. A minimum requirement o f fifty lines of memorizing is made. A t least three of the following classics must be read in class: Julius Caesar, Ancient Mariner, Vision of Sir Launfal, Idyls of the King. A t least four of the following are used for home reading: Ivanhoe, Vicar o f Wakefield, Kidnapped, Trail of the Sandhill Stag, Call of the Wild, Kennilworth, Tale of Two Cities. III. History of English Literature A short, concise history of English Literature is studied; the biographies and writings o f the most important authors are especially stressed. The origin of English prose and poetry, and the rise and forms o f drama are emphasized. A minimum requirement of one hundred lines of memorizing is made for the year. The last half-semester is devoted to an intensive study of composition with short paragraphs! studies, and oral and written themes, including class reports on various historical and scientific topics. IV. Class Reading Home Reading (A t least four) (A t least five) De Coverly Papers David Copperfield Macbeth Adam Bede Essay on Johnson Cranford Pal Graves Golden Treasury Old Curiosity Shop Prue and I Kim History of American Literature The forepart of the year is devoted to a study of the history of American Literature. Reports on various men and events in connection with American Literature are required. Book reviews and reports are made in class. One hundred lines of memorizing is required. The last half of the second semester is devoted to a completion of an intensive 71

75 O l iv e t C o llege study of composition and rhetoric. throughout the year. Note books are required Class Reading Home Reading Excerpts from American (A t least five) Poetry and Prose Irving s Sketchbook Washington s Farewell The Crisis Address Franklin s Autobiography Hamlet How the Other Half Lives The Oregon Trail The Conquest of Mexico The Virginian I. Ancient History HISTORY A study of the civilization of the Eastern Nations; the history c f the Greek people to the death of Alexander; Roman history to the breaking up of the world empire; Teutonic history to the death of Charlemagne. II. Modern History A study of the history of the late Roman Empire; the nations of Western Europe and England. Text: Robinson s Modern History. III. American History and Civics A history of political, social and economic development o f the United States, special emphasis placed upon the systematic study of the government. I., II. General Science SCIENCE This is a course briefly discussing all of the sciences and especially stressing the practical facts of each of them. Three hours per week are devoted to recitation, and four to laboratory. III. Physics A practical course in which the laws and phenomena of physics are carefully developed and illustrated, covering the field of mechanics, sound, heat, light, magnetism, and electricity. 72

76 O l iv e t C o llege IV. Chemistry This is a course designed for beginners in Chemistry. It embraces a study of the elements and their more familiar compounds; the locus of chemical action and a study of the practical application of Chemistry to the manufacturing arts. Full laboratory work accompanies the course. MATHEMATICS The work done in the department of Mathematics is closely correlated with business and the physical sciences. It is the aim also to develop in students the power and habit of concentration, of clear, consecutive independent thinking, and o f precise expression. These aims largely determine the course offered and the method of their presentation. A constant effort is made to render the elective courses so valuable that they will be attractive to the average student. I. Elementary Algebra Algebra is approached as generalized arithmetic. Much time is spent on introductory ideas. The following topics are treated: Positive and Negative Numbers, Fundamental Operations, Equations (with applications in Practical Problem s), Factoring and Fractions. II. Plane Geometry A study of plane figures including triangles, various forms o f the Quadrilateral, Similar Polygons, Equivalent Surfaces, Regular Polygons, Circles, Maxima and Minima of plant figures. In the beginning the heuristic method predominates. Many original exercises are solved. III. Advanced Algebra Rapid review of Quadratic Equations. Advanced work covering the theory of Quadratic Equations, Radicals, Ratio and Proportion, Variation, Progressions, Binomial Theorem for Positive Integral exponents, Problems from Arithmetic, Geometry and the physical sciences treated algebraically. First semester. IV. Solid Geometry Relation of lines and planes in space. Dihedral Angles, Polyhedrons, Cylinders, Cones and Spheres, with many original exercises. Easily constructed models are used in the introductory work. Frequent references to Plane Geometry are made. Second semester. 73

77 O l iv e t C ollege I. First Year LATIN Regular beginners work: Alphabet (Roman method), declension, conjugation, sentence-building, daily drill in reading, oral exercises, written work, memorized portions; several weeks o f connected compositions, stories, fables, etc. II. Second Year Four or six books of Caesar s Gallic W ars; collateral history, biographical sketches, geographical survey, home life, Rome among the nations, etc.; Prose Composition. III. Third Year Cicero The usual Four Orations, with selections from numerous others; careful study of the author as a man, a statesman, an author and a Roman; outside research work, original compositions on Roman Character, Literary style, Personal Influence, etc. Critical review of entire Grammar, Prose Composition (advanced) ; selections memorized, including portions of the Latin Bible. Three hours, both semesters. IV. Fourth Year Vergil Four or six books; daily study and practice of scansion; literary merits of the work thoroughly examined; contemporary history focused on the Poem; the Poem as a whole, as a world masterpiece; its plot, plan, purpose, prophecy its moral; Grammar briefly reviewed; Composition continued; Mythology; Latin Scriptures compared and memorized. Three hours, both semesters. I. First Year FRENCH This work consists of the usual First Book, with its Pronunciation, Inflection, and Grammatical Principles; Vocabulary is stressed; Selections are memorized; easy reading and written work are mastered; daily conversation drill is given; portions of the Bible are read and memorized. II. Second Year Grammar is reviewed and increased; letters, themes, and note-books are written; outside work is gathered into reviews; several classics are read and studied; extracts from prose, poetry, and the Bible are memorized. 74

78 Oliv e t C ollege SPANISH I. F irst Year Grammar is thoroughly studied, and reviewed constantly; much easy reading is done; conversation and memory drills are frequent; Spanish newspapers are read and portions of the Bible are required. II. Second Year - Various and varying annotated texts are read, chosen from different types of Literature, and numerous Authors, portraying life, scenery, and character in the many Spanishspeaking countries. Grammar, conversation, composition and Bible are continued. GERMAN This Language is coming back to its own. There can be no doubt of its value, in business and education. We offer a four years course. I. F irst Year Alphabet, Script, and Phonetics; Grammar; oral and written exercises; translation; composition; memory work. II. Second Year Easy and interesting Classics; modern texts of travel and customs; songs and conversation; memorizing o f poems and Bible Selections; composition. COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT MISS SMITH, MR. HARTER Many people have the idea that one does not need a Commercial Education unless he expects to enter business. However, we feel that this is a mistaken impression. Such an education is extremely practical and valuable in whatever line of work one expects to take up. Many o f our missionaries, as well as others, are taking up this course, as they feel it will be of much practical use to them on the foreign fields. COURSES OFFERED Short hand The Gregg System of Shorthand is taught. This is the shortest, simplest and most interesting system 75

79 O l iv e t C o llege of shorthand. After mastering the principles of the manual, the remaining time is spent in dictation, which deals with the various lines of business. Tests are given at different stages c f the work. A speed of one hundred words a minute is required for graduation. Typewriting The touch system of typewriting is taught, which means that the student is taught to operate the typewriter without looking at the keys. This enables him to write from his notes or a copy without having to lose much time in glancing back and forth to tind the position of the keys he wishes to strike. A speed of fifty-five words a minute on copy work and fifty words a minute on dictation is required for graduation. Spelling This course will consist of daily drills in written spelling. Business English, L etter Writing, and Punctuation The chief aim of these subjects is to teach the student the art of writing a good business letter, and how to use correct forms of English and punctuation, in connection with the letter writing work. Bookkeeping This embraces the principles of modern bookkeeping. The student is given actual bookkeeping work to do, which is similar to that which is done in the average business office. The principles are presented one at a time, and each principle is followed by a concrete illustration, thus making the subject easily mastered. The student becomes familiar with the Journal, cashbook, checkbook, purchase book, and ledger. Commercial Arithmetic This work is based on a text that covers the practical applications of Arithmetic to Business life. Rapid Calculation Daily drills are held in this subject, in which accuracy and speed are given primary importance. A fter the student has attained this, short methods of multiplication and division, computing interest and discount, etc., are dwelt upon until the student becomes proficient in this line of work. Commercial Law This will include the study of contracts, sales of personal property, negotiable instruments, 76

80 O l iv e t C o llege agency, bailment, partnership, corporations, insurance, real property, courts and their jurisdiction. SUB-PREPARATORY Eng. Grammar Mathematics Spelling U. S. History Geography 77

81 O l iv e t C o ll e g e LIST OF COLLEGE GRADUATES BY Y E A R LY CLASSES 1914 Zella Warner Deale, Ph.B China *Viola Willison, A.B India 1915 Otis P. Deale, B.S China T. Weber Willingham, A.B Danville, 111. Adam R. Shipley, Ph.B Surrey, N. D Elmer H. Kauffman, B.S Hartford, Conn. Samuel Ray Burkholder, B.S., B.Mus Olivet, 111. Alvin H. Kauffman, Jr., B.S Palestine Grace Gertrude McLemore, Ph.B Salem, Ind. Eula W. Jay, A.B Greencastle, Ind. James Bruce Deisenroth, B.S Pasadena, Calif. Mack E. Bouton, B.S Yampa, Colo. Olin Whitfield Waltz, A.B Del Monica, Calif. Otto Franklin Hinz, Ph.B St. Louis, Mo George Washington Luchsinger, B.S Surrey, N. D. Ruth Buell, B.S University Park, la. Lowell H. Coate, A.B Marion, Ind. Olin W. Waltz, A.B., B.S Del Monica, Calif T. Weber Willingham, A.B., B.D Danville, 111. Irl Stovall, B.S., B.D Vilonia, Ark. R. Wayne Gardner, B.S Wollaston, Mass. Winnie Schurman Carroll, B.S., A.B Pagoda, Colo. Raymond Hodges, A.B Hutchinson, Kans. Joshua Breuninger, A.B., Ped.B Selinsgrove, Pa. 78

82 O l iv e t C o llege 1919 Nellie Ellison, A.B., B.D India R. J. Carroll, B.S Denver, Colo. H. C. Benner, B.S Wollaston, Mass. Melza Brown, A.B Fairbury, Nebr. Lowell H. Coate, A.B., B.D Marion, Ind. Olin W. Waltz, A.B., B.S., B.D Del Monica, CaliL 1920 Venus Hudson Floyd, A.B Chicago, 111. S. A. Massie, B.S Columbus, Ohio H. C. Benner, B.S., B.D Wollaston, Mass. R. J. Carroll, B.S., B.D Denver, Colo Lawrence Howe, A.B Harvey, Joseph P. Ingle, A.B Terre Haute, Ind. Eose E. Bauerle, A.B Olivet, 111. James H. Garrison, A.B Brazil, Ind. Etta Eumph Chesmore, A.B divert, 111. Lowell R. Hoff, A.B Olivet, 111. Elsie Jenks, A.B Sterling, Colo. *Deceased. 79

83 O l iv e t C o llege LIST OF GRADUATES, 1923 College Graduates Bell, Henry, B.D Illinois Burkholder, Grace Ritchie, A.B. Illinois Cain, Della A., A.B..Indiana Campbell, D. Ray, A.B., low? Carl, Irene J., A.B Iowa Cooper, Ruth D., A.B. N. Y. McClain, Carl, A.B. Illinois Mellies, Amanda M., A.B Kansas Bible College Graduates Bogard, Emma Arkansas Bradbury, Lillie M Kansas Cooper, Dorothy E. Indiana Eggleston, Vera V..Michigan Frank, Anton J Illinois Morgan, J. Herbert..Indiana Rodgers, James A Illinois Stevens, Earl E Indiana White, M. Ruth Indiana Young, Albert C Indiana Academy Graduates Brobeck, P a u l Missouri Floyd, James A Illinois STUDENTS REGISTER Grimes, N a om i illinois Martin, E ls ie Indiana Morris, J u lia Illinois Peake, C h ristin e Illinois Price, V e rn o n Mississippi Rhoades, Iv e r n Illinois Roth, F loren ce Ohio Sherman, C la r a Illinois Sill, E lfr e id a Illinois Steele, E m ily Illinois Stinson, B ea trice Indiana Webb, C op h in e Indiana Wisler, H a ro ld Illinois Wood, A lfr e d Illinois Music Graduates Harter, C h ester Indiana Knox, F e r n Nebraska Morris, J u lia Illinois Peake, C arm en Illinois Richards, R u th Illinois Sub-Preparatory Graduates Craycraft, Iv a n Indiana McClain, L e e Illinois Wood, Ada O p a l Illinois Graduate Students Appleby, R a lp h Illinois Bauerle, R o s e Illinois Bauerle, R a lp h Illinois Bell, H e n ry Illinois Berry, A g n e s Illinois Jenks, E ls ie Colorado Burkholder, Mrs. S. R... Illinois College Cain, D e lla Indiana Appleby, L u c ile Illinois Campbell, D. Ray Iowa Appleby, A lfr e d Illinois Canaday, A r illa Illinois 80

84 O l iv e t C o lleg e Canaday, H a ze l Illinois Carl, Ir e n e Iowa Carlson, H a zel N. Dakota Chesemore, George.-Illinois Cornelius, Robert P. Illinois Cooper, R u th New York Cronk, C y r il Iowa Findlay, H ild a Michigan Floyd, M a r y Illinois Foster, R u b y Illinois Frank, A. J. Illinois Galloway, Harvey Missouri Gilley, E d n a Illinois Gilley, R u th Illinois Goode, Dortha D Iowa Goontz, E lm o Indiana Herrell, S am u el Missouri Hoff, M a r y Kansas Hoff, R u t h Kansas Jones, Helen M. Michigan Kelley, S eld en Illinois Lehman, E rn e st Africa Ludwig, Sylvester Missouri McClain, Carl Illinois Mellies, A m an da Kansas Moore, D a le Illinois Nease, B r y o n Illinois Peake, C arm en Illinois Peake, F ranklin Illinois Peters, Bryan A. Illinois Reed, Ida Mae Illinois Satterfield, L o is Illinois Sherman, M y rtle Illinois Sill, G ertrude Illinois Sloan, W m. Ohio Smith, M a rga ret Illinois Stark, E sth er Illinois Stoke, P a u l Illinois Thompson, Madge Missouri Trees, R u ssell Indiana Willingham, J o h n Illinois 81 Bible College B e ld e n, F lo y d H O h io B e a u g a r d, E m m a.- A r k a n s a s B r a d b u r y, L i l l i e K a n sa s B r o w n, C l a y Illin o is C o le m a n, N a n c y C o o p e r, D o r o t h y C r a d d o c k, D e l l a E g g le s t o n, V e r a In d ia n a In d ia n a I llin o is M ich ig a n F o s t e r, M a r i e Illin o is G a lb re a th, J o h n Illin o is G a te c liffe, G e o r g e G r iffin, A. A Illin o is. Illin o is H e n d e r s o n, C. W. In d ia n a H o llin g s w o r t h, M rs. M in n ie Illin o is J a c o b s, W. F. In d ia n a K im e, H a z e l In d ia n a L a n d o n, H o r t o n L u n d g r e e n, R o b e r t M ich ig a n O h io M o n t g o m e r y, C. E.-M ic h ig a n M o r g a n, J. H e r b e r t I n d ia n a P e te r s, J o s e p h I llin o is R ic h a r d s o n, L e s te r _ -I n d ia n a R o g e r s, J a m e s A. S c h ie r in g, H. C S m ith, L in e s V S te v e n s, E a r l E Illin o is Illin o is In d ia n a Illin o is S u tte r, A g n e s _ -P e n n s y lv a n ia T h r a ll, D o n M ich ig a n T r ip p e t t, F lo r e n c e U r s c h e l, G ilb e r t D In d ia n a O h io V e id t, J e n n i e O h io W h ite, M. R u t h W h ita c r e, J. M. In d ia n a In d ia n a W is le r, R. L Illin o is Y o r k, H o llis Illin o is Y o u n g, A lb e r t C. Academy In d ia n a B ell, Ir e n e Illin o is V iv in s, L e w i s K e n tu ck y

85 O l iv e t C o llege Brandyberry, Paul Illinois Brodbeck, P a u l Missouri Brough, C harles Michigan Collins, B lan ch e Indiana Cox, A n n alee Missouri Davis, L en ore Illinois Floyd, James Illinois Floyd, John Illinois Floyd, P a u l Illinois Gaar, V e r a Illinois Gebauer, E sth e r Indiana Graves, Clayton A Iowa Grimes, N a om i Illinois Harper, E dw ard Illinois Hoover, M y ron Illinois Hoover, V ir g il Illinois Johnson, H arold Illinois Jones, Vaughn W.--M ichigan Judd, T h elm a Illinois Kelley, M y r a Michigan Leary, E v e r e tt Indiana Lindberg, O. C.-Pennsylvania Maddox, E ls ie Illinois Martin, E ls ie Indiana Mellert, O p a l Illinois Montgomery, J oh n Illinois Morris, J u la Illinois Peake, C h ristin e Illinois Price, J. Vernon Mississippi Reese, G ranville Illinois Richards, A lexzine Illinois Rhoades, Iv e r n Illinois Roth, F loren ce Ohio Sampson, Catherine Illinois Sherman, C la r a Illinois Sill, E lfried a Illinois Sill, S c o t t Illinois Sleeth, M a u rice Indiana Sleeth, V irg in a Indiana Steele, E m ily Illinois Stinson, B eatrice Indiana S u ffe r n, A v e r y Illin o is S u ffe r n, K a t h l e e n Illin o is T a d lo c k, J a m e s I llin o is T in n e y, L o i s In d ia n a T o n g u e t t e, R u t h I llin o is W e b b, C o p h i n e In d ia n a W is le r, H a r o l d I llin o is W e ls h, F. A. M is s o u r i W o o d, A l f r e d I llin o is W o o d, J o h n Illin o is W o o d, R. E u g e n e - - M i c h i g a n W y s o c k i, B e r t h a I n d ia n a M im ic A c h a u e r, E d i t h O h io A lle n, C e c i l Illin o is A lle n, G l a d y s I llin o is A p p le b y, L u c i l e I llin o is B e ll, I r e n e Illin o is B lo d g e t t, G r a c e N e b r a s k a B lo d g e t t, R e u b e n - - N e b r a s k a B r a d b u r y, L i l l i e K a n s a s B r a n d b e r r y, P a u l Illin o is C a r te r, E d i t h I llin o is C r a y c r a f t, I v a n In d ia n a F lo y d, J o h n I llin o is F lo y d, P a u l I llin o is F lo y d, R u t h I llin o is F o s te r, M a r i e I llin o is G a a r, V e r a Illin o is G ille y, R u t h I llin o is G o o d e, D o r t h a Io w a G r e e r, E a r l I llin o is G re e r, E s t h e r I llin o is H a r t e r, C h e s t e r In d ia n a H e n d e r s o n, C. W. In d ia n a H o ff, M a r y K a n s a s H o ff, R u t h K a n s a s H o o k e r, E d i t h In d ia n a K n o p, J e n n i e M ich ig a n K n o x, F e r n N e b r a s k a L e w s a d e r, C l a u d e I llin o is 82

86 O l iv e t C o ll e g e Lundgreen, R obert Ohio McClain, L e e Illinois McClain, M axin e Illinois Montgomery, C. E. -Michigan Morris, Ju lia Illinois Morris, M a ry Nebraska Nease, E lizabeth Illinois Peake, B ernalice Illinois Peake, Carm en Illinois Peake, C hristine Illinois Peake, F ranklin Illinois Peters, H elen Illinois Pryor, R u th Ohio Reese, Granville Illinois Richards, R u th Illinois Scott, E dith Illinois Sherman, M yrtle Illinois Smith, E d ith Illinois Smith, Lines V. Indiana Steele, E m ily Illinois Stoke, M a r y Illinois Stoke, Paul Illinois Suffern, K athleen, Illinois Sutter, Agnes -Pennsylvania Smith, M arcia Illinois Tadlock, J a m e s Illinois Tadlock, M a rjo rie Illinois Tate, M argaret Illinois Thompson, Madge --Missouri Thornburg, M a b el Illinois Tonguette, E sth e r Illinois Tonguette, M a r y Illinois Trippett, Florence --Indiana Webb, C oph ine Indiana Welsh, F. A. Missouri Whitlock, D o n n a Illinois Wysocki, B erth a Indiana York, H ollis Illinois Young, Mrs. A. C. --Indiana Expression Appleby, Alfred Illinois A p p le b y, L u c i l e B lo d g e t t, G r a c e B lo d g e t t, R e u b e n Illin o is N e b r a s k a N e b r a s k a C a in, D e l l a In d ia n a C a m p b e ll, D. R a y C a n a d a y, H a z e l Io w a Illin o is C a rl, I r e n e Io w a C o o p e r, R u t h E llis, N e w Y o r k H e le n I llin o is F o s t e r, R u b y Illin o is F r a n k, A. J. I llin o is G a a r, V e r a Illin o is K e lle y, S e l d e n I llin o is M cc la in, C a r l Illin o is M e llie s, A m a n d a K a n s a s M o n t g o m e r y, C. E.-M ic h ig a n P e a k e, C a r m e n P e a k e, F r a n k l i n R e e d, Id a M a e I llin o is Illin o is I llin o is R ic h ie, P e a r l Illin o is S h e rm a n, M y r t l e S m ith, M a r c i a Illin o is I llin o is S te v e n s, E a r l E Illin o is T h o m p s o n, M a d g e -.M i s s o u r i T o n g u e t t e, E s t h e r T o n g u e t t e, M a r y T r e e s, R u s s e l l Illin o is Illin o is In d ia n a T r ip p e t t, F lo r e n c e _ -I n d ia n a W illin g h a m, J o h n W h ite, M. R u t h A rt B lo d g e t t, G r a c e T a d lo c k, J a m e s T a d lo c k, M a r j o r i e I llin o is In d ia n a N e b r a s k a Illin o is Illin o is T r ip p e t t, F lo r e n c e _.I n d ia n a Nursing A p p le b y, L u c i l e Illin o is B a u e rle, R o s e Illin o is B e a u g a r d, E m m a..a r k a n s a s B r a d b u r y, L i l l i e B r o u g h, C h a r l e s K a n s a s M ich ig a n 83

87 O l iv e t C o ll e g e Carlson, H a z e l N. Dakota Coleman, N a n cy Indiana Collins, B lan ch e Indiana Cooper, R u th New York Eggleston, V e r a Michigan Foster, R u b y Illinois Frank, A. J. Illinois Harter, Chester Indiana Kime, H a zel Indiana Morris, J u lia Illinois Reed, Ida M a e Illinois Richardson, Lester Indiana Sherman, C la r a Illinois Stevens, Mrs. Earl Illinois Thrall, D o n Michigan Tinney, L o is Indiana Trippett, Florence Indiana Correspondence Ackerman, Archie..M ichigan Botterson, H. S Indiana Burns, Mrs. I. H Missouri Fleagle, Walter A..Minnesota H e tz e l, E s t e l l a M ic h ig a n P a y n e, E. W O h io Commercial A lle n, G l a d y s Illin o is B a u e rle, R o s e Illin o is B r itt, G r a c e In d ia n a H o o k e r, E d i t h In d ia n a K im e, H a z e l In d ia n a K n o w le s, N a o m i In d ia n a L e h m a n, E d n a In d ia n a M c C la in, M a x i n e I llin o is M a d d o x, E l s i e Illin o is S m ith, M a r g a r e t I llin o is S to k e, P a u l Illin o is W is le r, H a r o l d Illin o is W o o d, A l f r e d Illin o is W o o d, J o h n Illin o is Sub-Pre paratory C r a y c r a f t, I v a n In d ia n a H u n n ic u tt, W m...t e n n e s s e e M cc la in, L e e I llin o is M o r r is, M a r y N e b r a s k a W o o d, A d a O p a l Illin o is 84

88

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