GLOBAL CLIMATES FOCUS

Save this PDF as:
Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "GLOBAL CLIMATES FOCUS"

Transcription

1 which you will learn more about in Chapter 6. Refer to the climate map and chart on pages as you read the rest of this chapter. FOCUS GLOBAL CLIMATES What are the major influences on climate? Where are the major global climate regions located? People living in advanced industrial nations such as the United States have used technology to control the effects of climate on their daily lives. Such societies have invested billions of dollars to cool and heat homes and offices, to build water delivery systems for farms and cities, and to construct transportation systems that can operate in good weather and bad. But for four out of every five people on Earth, climate continues to have an immediate impact on every aspect of daily existence. The clothes people wear, the places they live, and the foods they eat all are influenced by climate. The major global climate types are classified mainly by temperature and precipitation differences, both of which are influenced by latitude. That is, latitude has the most control over which regions are hot or cold, wet or dry. To a slightly lesser degree, a region's location on land and its elevation also affect climate. Because the vegetation found in a place is a response to its climate, vegetation is sometimes used to classify climate. Some climate types are named for the dominant vegetation of the region, LOCATION Low-Latitude Climates The areas close to the equator mostly have warm temperatures and a large amount of rainfall yearround. These wet, hot areas have a humid-tropical climate. People who live in the humid tropics never experience winter or even cool weather. Because the equator is constantly being heated by the sun's rays, warm air is always rising in the humid tropics. This continuous rising of warm, unstable air brings almost daily thunderstorms and heavy rainfall. The combination of continuous warm temperatures and heavy rainfall creates ideal conditions for plant growth, and dense tropical rain forests thrive here. In some tropical areas, especially India and Southeast Asia, the rain is concentrated in one very wet season. During- the summer months, moist air flows into these parts of Asia from the warm ocean (high-pressure area) to the hotter land (low-pressure area), bringing heavy rains. During the winter, dry air flows off the cooling continent (high-pressure area) to the warm oceans (low-pressure area), bringing dry conditions to the area. The wind that blows from the same direction for months at a definite season of the year is called a monsoon. Text continues on page 30. Residents of Bombay, India, wade through the high waters caused by the wet monsoon. From where do monsoon winds blow during the wet monsoon season in India?

2 Climates have shaped the world's landscapes and created regions with distinct characteristics. Much of bitterly cold Greenland (above) is covered by an ice cap. A humid-tropical climate nurtures this rain forest in Suriname, South America (upper right). Across the same continent, the Andes Mountains of Peru (right) provide a climate with conditions that vary by elevation. Just to the north and south of the humidtropical climate is the tropical-savanna climate. This wet- and dry-tropical climate is produced by the seasonal change due to the way that the sun's rays strike the areas north and south of the equator. For example, during high-sun season (summer), the sun's rays strike most directly. This high sun increases the temperature and causes low pressure and unstable, rising air that produces heavy rainfall. During the low-sun season (winter), the opposite occurs. As the direct solar rays move to the opposite hemisphere, the subtropical high-pressure zone moves into the area. This causes stable, cool, sinking air and a dry season. BHBfflSB Dry Climates Though their temperatures may vary greatly, all dry climate regions share aridity, or low annual rainfall. The two types of dry climates are the arid desert climate and the semiarid steppe climate. Most of the desert climate areas are centered at about 30 north and south of the equator. The dryness is caused by the subtropical highpressure zone, which brings stable, sinking, dry air all year. Very little rain is produced, and few plants can survive. The largest desert is the Sahara, which stretches across all of northern Africa. As you read earlier, large deserts also form in the rain shadow to the leeward side of mountains. An example is the Great Basin of the United States. Other deserts are far into the interior of continents, away from moisture-bearing winds. These deserts include the Gobi and Taklimakan deserts of Asia, and the deserts of the dry interior of Australia. These desert regions are blocked from rain by mountain ranges and great distances across large continents. They experience temperature extremes ranging from extremely cold temperatures during winter to hot, scorching temperatures during summer. Small and very dry deserts are found along the west coasts of continents. Here, the cool ocean currents cause stable conditions, and it may not rain for many years. Examples of dry coastal deserts are found along the west coasts of South America, southwestern Africa, and Mexico. The semiarid steppe climate is a transition area between the arid deserts and the more humid climates. The term steppe refers to shortgrass vegetation. Areas with steppe climates

3 receive more moisture than the deserts but less than the more humid areas. Steppe climates generally support grasslands, and trees are rare except along river banks. Today, the natural grasslands in many places have been replaced with fields of food grains. Poor farming practices and overgrazing have turned some natural grasslands into human-made deserts. LOCATION Middle-Latitude Climates As is the case with low-latitude climates, there are several types of middle-latitude climates. Located between 30 and 40 latitude, the Mediterranean climate is confined mainly to the coastal areas of southern Europe and the west coasts of continents with cool ocean currents. Mediterranean climates usually do not extend far inland beyond mountain ranges. The stable, sinking air of the subtropical high-pressure zone causes long, sunny, dry summers. During the mild winter, however, cool middle-latitude storms enter the region with the westerlies and bring needed rains. The humid-subtropical climate is much more widespread than the Mediterranean climate. This climate is found on the eastern side of continents with warm ocean currents. The humid-subtropical climate is greatly affected by moist air flowing off the warm ocean waters. Summers are hot and humid. Winters are mild, with occasional frost and some snow. The warm ocean currents cause areas with the humid-subtropical climate to be struck by occasional hurricanes or typhoons. A climate type influenced mainly by oceans is called the marine-west-coast climate. This climate is generally found on the west coasts of continents in the upper middle latitudes. Temperatures are mild all year. Middle-latitude storms traveling across the oceans in the westerlies bring most of the rainfall to areas with this climate. Winters are foggy, cloudy, and rainy, but summers can be warm and sunny. This climate supports dense evergreen forests in the Northwest United States. The marine-west-coast climate is most widespread in northwestern Europe where the absence of mountain ranges along the coast allows the cool, moist ocean air to spread far into the interior of the continent. The humid-continental climate is found in latitudes that are subject to periodic invasions of both warm and cold air. This climate has the most changeable weather conditions and experiences four distinct seasons. Its midcontinental locations are responsible for extreme differences between summer and winter temperatures. Because this climate type is situated along the polar front, middle-latitude storms bring rain throughout much of the year and bring snow in winter. Precipitation is heavy enough to support forests. Chapter3 31

4 LOCATION High-Latitude Climates Located in the high latitudes, the subarctic climate is centered above 0 north latitude. This climate has long, dark, cold winters, with temperatures staying well below freezing for half of the year. During the short summers, however, very warm temperatures can occur. The subarctic climate has the greatest annual temperature ranges in the world. Though severe, the subarctic climate supports vast evergreen forests. The subarctic climate region is very large, extending across northern North America, Europe, and Asia. The Southern Hemisphere lacks this climate type because there is no land at these latitudes. Another climate with a long winter is the tundra climate. Temperatures are above freezing only during the short summers. The tundra climate takes its name from the only vegetation that can survive there. Tundra vegetation is made up of small, hardy plants such as mosses, lichens (LIEkuhnz), herbs, and low shrubs. The climate is so severe that no trees grow. Water below the tundra surface remains frozen throughout the year. This condition is called permafrost. Although the melting winter snow creates swamps and bogs on the surface during the summer, permafrost makes it difficult for the water to seep into the ground. These wet areas do, however, support great numbers of insects and birds during the short summer. The polar ice-cap climate has cold temperatures all year, and snowfall is likely year-round. Life is almost impossible in polar ice-cap climates. Only animals and plants that can live in the icy polar seas survive here. LOCATION Highland Climates As you learned earlier, an increase in elevation causes a decrease in temperature. Highland climates are determined by elevation rather than by latitude. Mountain areas of the world can have a variety of climate types in a very small area. The lowest elevations of a mountain will have a climate and vegetation similar to that of the surrounding area. As you climb higher up the mountain, the climate conditions change. Temperatures and air pressure are lower. The cooler temperatures limit the vegetation that can grow, especially trees. At the highest elevations, climate conditions are similar to those of the polar ice-cap climate. Here, temperatures remain below freezing, and ice and snow are always present. SECTION REVIEW 1. How does the latitude of a place influence its climate? 2. Give an example of a climate type found in each of the following climate regions: low-latitude, dry, middle-latitude, and high-latitude. 3. Critical Thinking Compare and contrast desert climates and tundra climates. 32 Unit 1

5 (A <U a ) l/> Q S 0) o o Climate HUMID TROPICAL TROPICAL SAVANNA DESERT STEPPE.^B MEDITERRANEAN HUMID SUBTROPICAL Geographic Distribution along Equator; particularly equatorial South America, Zaire Basin in Africa, Southeast Asia between humid tropics and deserts; tropical regions of Africa, South and Central America, southern and Southeast Asia, Australia centered along 30 latitude; some middlelatitude deserts in interior of large continents and along western coasts; particularly Saharan Africa, southwest Asia, central and western Australia, southwestern North America generally bordering deserts and interiors of large continents; particularly northern and southern Africa, interior western North America, central and interior Asia and Australia, southern South America west coasts in middle latitudes; particularly southern Europe, part of southwest Asia, northwestern Africa, California, southwestern Australia, central Chile, southwestern South Africa east coasts in middle latitudes; particularly southeastern United States, eastern Asia, central southern Europe, southeastern parts of South America, South Africa, and Australia Major Weather Patterns warm and rainy year-round, with rain totaling anywhere from 6 to more than 40 in. (16-1,143 cm) annually; typical temperatures are 90-9 F (32-3 < 'C) during the day and 6-70"F (18-21''C) at night warm all year; distinct rainy and dry seasons; precipitation during the summer of at least 20 in. (1 cm) and in some locations exceeding 10 in. (380 cm); summer temperatures average 90 F (32 C) during the day and 70 F (21 C) at night; typical winter temperatures are 7-80 F (24-27 C) during the day and -60 F (13-16 C) at night arid; precipitation of less than 10 in. (2 cm) annually; sunny and hot in the tropics and sunny with great temperature ranges in middle latitudes; typical summer temperatures for lower-latitude deserts are F (43-46 C) during the day and 60-6 F (16-18 C) at night, while winter temperatures average 80 F (27 C) during the day and 4 F (7 C) at night; in middle latitudes, the hottest month averages 70 F (24 C) semiarid; about in. (2-1 cm) of precipitation annually; hot summers and cooler winters with wide temperature ranges similar to desert temperatures dry, sunny, warm summers and mild, wetter winters; precipitation averages 1-20 in. (38-1 cm) annually; typical temperatures are 7-80 F (24-27 C) on summer days; the average winter temperature is0 F(10 C) hot, humid summers and mild, humid winters; precipitation year-round; coastal areas are in the paths of hurricanes and typhoons; precipitation averages 40 in. (102 cm) annually; typical temperatures are 7-90 F (24-32 C) in summer and 4-0 F (7-10 C) in winter Vegetation tropical rain forest tropical grassland with scattered trees sparse droughtresistant plants; many barren, rocky, or sandy areas grassland; few trees scrub woodland and grassland mixed forest s -0 3 TO <U O D Climate MARINE WEST COAST HUMID CONTINENTAL Geographic Distribution west coasts in upper-middle latitudes; particularly northwestern Europe and North America, southwestern South America, central southern South Africa, southeastern Australia, New Zealand east coasts and interiors of upper-middlelatitude continents; particularly northeastern North America, northern and eastern Europe, northeastern Asia Major Weather Patterns cloudy, mild summers and cool, rainy winters; strong ocean influence; precipitation averages in. (1-12 cm) annually, with some coastal mountains receiving more than 200 in. (08 cm); average temperature in hottest month usually is between 60 F and 70 F (16-21 C); average temperature in coolest month usually is above 32 F (0 C) four distinct seasons; long, cold winters and short, warm summers; precipitation amounts vary, usually 20-0 in. or more (1-127 cm) annually; average summer temperature is 7 F (24 C); average winter temperature is below freezing Vegetation temperate evergreen forest mixed forest VI VI SUBARCTIC higher latitudes of interior and east coasts of continents; particularly northern parts of North America, Europe, and Asia extremes of temperature; long, cold winters and short, warm summers; low precipitation amounts all year; precipitation averages -1 in. (13-38 cm) in summer; temperatures in warmest month average 60 F (16 C), but can warm to 90 F (32 C); winter temperatures average below 0 F(-18''C) northern evergreen forest 3 re i.c 01 X TUNDRA ICECAP high-latitude coasts; particularly far northern parts of North America, Europe, and Asia, Antarctic Peninsula, subantarctic islands polar regions; particularly Antarctica, Greenland, Arctic Basin islands cold all year; very long, cold winters and very short, cool summers; low precipitation amounts; precipitation average is -1 in. (13-38 cm) annually; warmest month averages 40"F (4 C); coolest month averages a little below 0 F(-18 C) freezing cold; snow and ice year-round; precipitation averages less than 10 in. (2 cm) annually; average temperatures in warmest month are not higher than freezing moss, lichens, low shrubs; permafrost bogs in summer no vegetation HIGHLAND 'SSSSBSSSSSfSk high mountain regions, particularly western parts of North and South America, eastern parts of Asia and Africa, southern and central Europe and Asia i greatly varied temperatures and precipitation amounts over short distances as elevation changes forest to tundra vegetation, depending on elevation

6

Tropical Moist Rainforest

Tropical Moist Rainforest Tropical or Lowlatitude Climates: Controlled by equatorial tropical air masses Tropical Moist Rainforest Rainfall is heavy in all months - more than 250 cm. (100 in.). Common temperatures of 27 C (80 F)

More information

Module 11: Meteorology Topic 3 Content: Climate Zones Notes

Module 11: Meteorology Topic 3 Content: Climate Zones Notes Introduction Latitude is such an important climate factor that you can make generalizations about a location's climate based on its latitude. Areas near the equator or the low latitudes are generally hot

More information

World Geography Chapter 3

World Geography Chapter 3 World Geography Chapter 3 Section 1 A. Introduction a. Weather b. Climate c. Both weather and climate are influenced by i. direct sunlight. ii. iii. iv. the features of the earth s surface. B. The Greenhouse

More information

Our climate system is based on the location of hot and cold air mass regions and the atmospheric circulation created by trade winds and westerlies.

Our climate system is based on the location of hot and cold air mass regions and the atmospheric circulation created by trade winds and westerlies. CLIMATE REGIONS Have you ever wondered why one area of the world is a desert, another a grassland, and another a rainforest? Or have you wondered why are there different types of forests and deserts with

More information

WHAT CAN MAPS TELL US ABOUT THE GEOGRAPHY OF ANCIENT GREECE? MAP TYPE 1: CLIMATE MAPS

WHAT CAN MAPS TELL US ABOUT THE GEOGRAPHY OF ANCIENT GREECE? MAP TYPE 1: CLIMATE MAPS WHAT CAN MAPS TELL US ABOUT THE GEOGRAPHY OF ANCIENT GREECE? MAP TYPE 1: CLIMATE MAPS MAP TYPE 2: PHYSICAL AND/OR TOPOGRAPHICAL MAPS MAP TYPE 3: POLITICAL MAPS TYPE 4: RESOURCE & TRADE MAPS Descriptions

More information

forest tropical jungle swamp marsh prairie savanna pampas Different Ecosystems (rainforest)

forest tropical jungle swamp marsh prairie savanna pampas Different Ecosystems (rainforest) Different Ecosystems forest A region of land that is covered with many trees and shrubs. tropical jungle (rainforest) swamp A region with dense trees and a variety of plant life. It has a tropical climate.

More information

Climate Classification Chapter 7

Climate Classification Chapter 7 Climate Classification Chapter 7 Climate Systems Earth is extremely diverse No two places exactly the same Similarities between places allow grouping into regions Climates influence ecosystems Why do we

More information

Keys to Climate Climate Classification Low Latitude Climates Midlatitude Climates High Latitude Climates Highland Climates Our Changing Climate

Keys to Climate Climate Classification Low Latitude Climates Midlatitude Climates High Latitude Climates Highland Climates Our Changing Climate Climate Global Climates Keys to Climate Climate Classification Low Latitude Climates Midlatitude Climates High Latitude Climates Highland Climates Our Changing Climate Keys to Climate Climate the average

More information

Climate Chapter 19. Earth Science, 10e. Stan Hatfield and Ken Pinzke Southwestern Illinois College

Climate Chapter 19. Earth Science, 10e. Stan Hatfield and Ken Pinzke Southwestern Illinois College Climate Chapter 19 Earth Science, 10e Stan Hatfield and Ken Pinzke Southwestern Illinois College The climate system A. Climate is an aggregate of weather B. Involves the exchanges of energy and moisture

More information

Lecture Outlines PowerPoint. Chapter 20 Earth Science 11e Tarbuck/Lutgens

Lecture Outlines PowerPoint. Chapter 20 Earth Science 11e Tarbuck/Lutgens Lecture Outlines PowerPoint Chapter 20 Earth Science 11e Tarbuck/Lutgens 2006 Pearson Prentice Hall This work is protected by United States copyright laws and is provided solely for the use of instructors

More information

Mediterranean Climates (Csa, Csb)

Mediterranean Climates (Csa, Csb) Climatic Zones & Types Part II I've lived in good climate, and it bores the hell out of me. I like weather rather than climate. 1 John Steinbeck Mediterranean Climates (Csa, Csb) Main locations Western

More information

Bell Work. REVIEW: Our Planet Earth Page 29 Document A & B Questions

Bell Work. REVIEW: Our Planet Earth Page 29 Document A & B Questions 9.12.16 Bell Work REVIEW: Our Planet Earth Page 29 Document A & B Questions Intro to Climate & Weather https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhgyoa70q7y Weather vs. Climate Video Climate & Weather 3.1 Weather

More information

Chapter 3 Section 3 World Climate Regions In-Depth Resources: Unit 1

Chapter 3 Section 3 World Climate Regions In-Depth Resources: Unit 1 Guided Reading A. Determining Cause and Effect Use the organizer below to show the two most important causes of climate. 1. 2. Climate B. Making Comparisons Use the chart below to compare the different

More information

16 Global Climate. Learning Goals. Summary. After studying this chapter, students should be able to:

16 Global Climate. Learning Goals. Summary. After studying this chapter, students should be able to: 16 Global Climate Learning Goals After studying this chapter, students should be able to: 1. associate the world s six major vegetation biomes to climate (pp. 406 408); 2. describe methods for classifying

More information

Factors That Affect Climate

Factors That Affect Climate Factors That Affect Climate Factors That Affect Climate Latitude As latitude (horizontal lines) increases, the intensity of solar energy decreases. The tropical zone is between the tropic of Cancer and

More information

Climate Classification

Climate Classification Chapter 15: World Climates The Atmosphere: An Introduction to Meteorology, 12 th Lutgens Tarbuck Lectures by: Heather Gallacher, Cleveland State University Climate Classification Köppen classification:

More information

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Tarbuck Lutgens Chapter 21 Climate 21.1 Factors That Affect Climate Factors That Affect Climate Latitude As latitude increases, the intensity of solar energy decreases. The

More information

Energy Systems, Structures and Processes Essential Standard: Analyze patterns of global climate change over time Learning Objective: Differentiate

Energy Systems, Structures and Processes Essential Standard: Analyze patterns of global climate change over time Learning Objective: Differentiate Energy Systems, Structures and Processes Essential Standard: Analyze patterns of global climate change over time Learning Objective: Differentiate between weather and climate Global Climate Focus Question

More information

1 What Is Climate? TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why do areas near the equator tend to have high temperatures?

1 What Is Climate? TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why do areas near the equator tend to have high temperatures? CHAPTER 17 1 What Is Climate? SECTION Climate BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is climate? What factors affect climate? How do climates differ

More information

Elements of weather and climate Temperature Range of temperature Seasonal temperature pattern Rainfall

Elements of weather and climate Temperature Range of temperature Seasonal temperature pattern Rainfall Climate Earth Science Chapter 20 Pages 560-573 Elements of weather and climate Temperature Range of temperature Seasonal temperature pattern Rainfall Overall rainfall Seasonal distribution of rainfall

More information

CH. 3: Climate and Vegetation

CH. 3: Climate and Vegetation CH. 3: Climate and Vegetation GROUP WORK RUBRIC Score of 50 (5): Superior - 100% A 5 is superior work, and has completed all requirements of the assignments, it is in order and its presentation is almost

More information

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Tarbuck Lutgens Chapter 21 Climate 21.1 Factors That Affect Climate Factors That Affect Climate Latitude As latitude increases, the intensity of solar energy decreases. The

More information

1 What Is Climate? TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why do areas near the equator tend to have high temperatures?

1 What Is Climate? TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why do areas near the equator tend to have high temperatures? CHAPTER 17 1 What Is Climate? SECTION Climate BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is climate? What factors affect climate? How do climates differ

More information

1 What Is Climate? TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why do areas near the equator tend to have high temperatures?

1 What Is Climate? TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why do areas near the equator tend to have high temperatures? CHAPTER 3 1 What Is Climate? SECTION Climate BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is climate? What factors affect climate? How do climates differ

More information

IR-20: Weather/Climate Venn Diagram. Weather Climate Region 4 Education Service Center Geography by Design, Volume 1

IR-20: Weather/Climate Venn Diagram. Weather Climate Region 4 Education Service Center Geography by Design, Volume 1 IR-20: Weather/Climate Venn Diagram Weather Climate 2013 Region 4 Education Service Center Geography by Design, Volume 1 IR-21: Climate Scenario Cards Scenario 1: You are on vacation at a location on the

More information

Biomes There are 2 types: Terrestrial Biomes (on land) Aquatic Biomes (in the water)

Biomes There are 2 types: Terrestrial Biomes (on land) Aquatic Biomes (in the water) Biomes There are 2 types: Terrestrial Biomes (on land) Aquatic Biomes (in the water) Terrestrial Biomes Grassland, Desert, and Tundra Biomes: Savanna Temperate grassland Chaparral Desert Tundra Chapter

More information

Weather Atmospheric condition in one place during a limited period of time Climate Weather patterns that an area typically experiences over a long

Weather Atmospheric condition in one place during a limited period of time Climate Weather patterns that an area typically experiences over a long Weather Atmospheric condition in one place during a limited period of time Climate Weather patterns that an area typically experiences over a long period of time Many factors influence weather & climate

More information

Weather Atmospheric condition in one place during a limited period of time Climate Weather patterns that an area typically experiences over a long

Weather Atmospheric condition in one place during a limited period of time Climate Weather patterns that an area typically experiences over a long Weather Atmospheric condition in one place during a limited period of time Climate Weather patterns that an area typically experiences over a long period of time Many factors influence weather & climate

More information

Name Date Class. well as the inland, found near the Tropics. 4. In the, or the regions near the Equator, you may find a lush

Name Date Class. well as the inland, found near the Tropics. 4. In the, or the regions near the Equator, you may find a lush WATER, CLIMATE, AND VEGETATION Vocabulary Activity DIRECTIONS: Fill in the Blanks Select a term from below to complete each of the following sentences. CHAPTER 1. The constant movement of water, a process

More information

3) What is the difference between latitude and longitude and what is their affect on local and world weather and climate?

3) What is the difference between latitude and longitude and what is their affect on local and world weather and climate? www.discoveryeducation.com 1) Describe the difference between climate and weather citing an example of each. Describe how water (ocean, lake, river) has a local effect on weather and climate and provide

More information

World Climates. Say Thanks to the Authors Click (No sign in required)

World Climates. Say Thanks to the Authors Click  (No sign in required) World Climates Say Thanks to the Authors Click http://www.ck12.org/saythanks (No sign in required) To access a customizable version of this book, as well as other interactive content, visit www.ck12.org

More information

CORE CONCEPTS WEATHER AND CLIMATE

CORE CONCEPTS WEATHER AND CLIMATE CORE CONCEPTS WEATHER AND CLIMATE Key Prior Knowledge (from the 5 th Grade Matter and Energy Units) Thermal energy can be transported through radiation, conduction, and convection. The transfer of enough

More information

3 Temperate and Polar Zones

3 Temperate and Polar Zones CHAPTER 3 3 Temperate and Polar Zones SECTION Climate BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What biomes are found in the temperate zone? What biomes

More information

L.O Students will learn about factors that influences the environment

L.O Students will learn about factors that influences the environment Name L.O Students will learn about factors that influences the environment Date 1. At the present time, glaciers occur mostly in areas of A) high latitude or high altitude B) low latitude or low altitude

More information

Unit 2. United States Physical Geography

Unit 2. United States Physical Geography Unit 2 United States Physical Geography Physical Geography U.S. extends from the Atlantic to Pacific U.S. is the 3rd largest country U.S. has fertile soils, vast forests, and variety of minerals All major

More information

The Global Scope of Climate. The Global Scope of Climate. Keys to Climate. Chapter 8

The Global Scope of Climate. The Global Scope of Climate. Keys to Climate. Chapter 8 The Global Scope of Climate Chapter 8 The Global Scope of Climate In its most general sense, climate is the average weather of a region, but except where conditions change very little during the course

More information

Tropical Climates Zone

Tropical Climates Zone Tropical Climates Zone RAIN FOREST CENTRAL AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA (AMAZON), CENTRAL AMERICA, S.E. ASIA HUMID/WARM ANNUAL RAINFALL 200 CM TYPE #1: TROPICAL DESERT N. AFRICA (SAHARA) & S.W. ASIA < 25 CM

More information

Climate. Earth Science Chapter 20 Pages

Climate. Earth Science Chapter 20 Pages Academic Excellence Showcase Thursday, May 27 Two points credit for each talk you attend in Earth science 8:30 to 10:30 AM, in NS 101 General Science video productions: Energy 9:00 to 11:00 AM, in NS 218

More information

Earth s Climates. Understanding Weather and Climate. Chapter 15 Lecture. Seventh Edition

Earth s Climates. Understanding Weather and Climate. Chapter 15 Lecture. Seventh Edition Chapter 15 Lecture Understanding Weather and Climate Seventh Edition Earth s Climates Frode Stordal, University of Oslo Redina L. Herman Western Illinois University Climate and Controlling Factors Climate

More information

remain on the trees all year long) Example: Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada

remain on the trees all year long) Example: Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada Coniferous Forest Temperature: -40 C to 20 C, average summer temperature is 10 C Precipitation: 300 to 900 millimeters of rain per year Vegetation: Coniferous-evergreen trees (trees that produce cones

More information

All objects emit radiation. Radiation Energy that travels in the form of waves Waves release energy when absorbed by an object. Earth s energy budget

All objects emit radiation. Radiation Energy that travels in the form of waves Waves release energy when absorbed by an object. Earth s energy budget Radiation Energy that travels in the form of waves Waves release energy when absorbed by an object Example: Sunlight warms your face without necessarily heating the air Shorter waves carry more energy

More information

World geography 3200/3202 Unit 2 review

World geography 3200/3202 Unit 2 review World geography 3200/3202 Unit 2 review 1. Does this statement use the terms revolve & rotate correctly? "Saturn revolves on its axis while several moons rotate around it." 2. Does this statement use the

More information

community. A biome can be defined as a major biological community of plants and animals with similar life forms and

community. A biome can be defined as a major biological community of plants and animals with similar life forms and Science & Math Earth's Systems: What is a biome? The major recognizable life zones of the continents are called biomes. Because vegetation is usually the dominant and most apparent feature of the landscape,

More information

What is Climate? Understanding and predicting climatic changes are the basic goals of climatology.

What is Climate? Understanding and predicting climatic changes are the basic goals of climatology. What is Climate? Understanding and predicting climatic changes are the basic goals of climatology. Climatology is the study of Earth s climate and the factors that affect past, present, and future climatic

More information

I. Definitions. A. Weather--day by day variations in temperature (temp), winds, pressure and precipitation (ppt)

I. Definitions. A. Weather--day by day variations in temperature (temp), winds, pressure and precipitation (ppt) CLIMATE UNIT I. Definitions A. Weather--day by day variations in temperature (temp), winds, pressure and precipitation (ppt) B. Climate--average seasonal weather for an area, usually described in terms

More information

Global Wind Patterns

Global Wind Patterns Name: Earth Science: Date: Period: Global Wind Patterns 1. Which factor causes global wind patterns? a. changes in the distance between Earth and the Moon b. unequal heating of Earth s surface by the Sun

More information

Seasons, Global Wind and Climate Study Guide

Seasons, Global Wind and Climate Study Guide Seasons, Global Wind and Climate Study Guide Seasons 1. Know what is responsible for the change in seasons on Earth. 2. Be able to determine seasons in the northern and southern hemispheres given the position

More information

Climate versus Weather

Climate versus Weather Climate versus Weather What is climate? Climate is the average weather usually taken over a 30-year time period for a particular region and time period. Climate is not the same as weather, but rather,

More information

Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. CH.15 practice TEST Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) The short-term state of the atmosphere is called a) climate. c) water cycle. b) weather.

More information

Climate and Biomes. Adapted by T.Brunetto from: Developed by Steven Taylor Wichmanowski based in part on Pearson Environmental Science by Jay Withgott

Climate and Biomes. Adapted by T.Brunetto from: Developed by Steven Taylor Wichmanowski based in part on Pearson Environmental Science by Jay Withgott Climate and Biomes Adapted by T.Brunetto from: Developed by Steven Taylor Wichmanowski based in part on Pearson Environmental Science by Jay Withgott Remember that an ecosystem consists of all the biotic

More information

Average temperature ( F) World Climate Zones. very cold all year with permanent ice and snow. very cold winters, cold summers, and little rain or snow

Average temperature ( F) World Climate Zones. very cold all year with permanent ice and snow. very cold winters, cold summers, and little rain or snow P r e v i e w Look carefully at the climagraph of Mumbai, India. What is the wettest month (or months) in Mumbai? What is the driest month (or months) in Mumbai? What effects might this city s climate

More information

Our Living Planet. Chapter 15

Our Living Planet. Chapter 15 Our Living Planet Chapter 15 Learning Goals I can describe the Earth s climate and how we are affected by the sun. I can describe what causes different climate zones. I can describe what makes up an organisms

More information

UNIT 3. World Ecosystems

UNIT 3. World Ecosystems UNIT 3 World Ecosystems Description and Review World Geography 3202 World Ecosystems Climax Vegetation Climax Vegetation is the natural vegetation in the last possible stage of vegetation development.

More information

LAB J - WORLD CLIMATE ZONES

LAB J - WORLD CLIMATE ZONES Introduction LAB J - WORLD CLIMATE ZONES The objective of this lab is to familiarize the student with the various climates around the world and the climate controls that influence these climates. Students

More information

Contents. Section 1: Climate Factors. Section 2: Climate Types. Section 3: Climate Effects

Contents. Section 1: Climate Factors. Section 2: Climate Types. Section 3: Climate Effects Contents Section 1: Climate Factors 1. Weather or Climate?.... 2 2. Elements of Climate.... 4 3. Factors Affecting Climate.... 10 4. Comparing Climates.... 15 5. Quiz 1.... 20 Section 2: Climate Types

More information

Global Biogeography. Natural Vegetation. Structure and Life-Forms of Plants. Terrestrial Ecosystems-The Biomes

Global Biogeography. Natural Vegetation. Structure and Life-Forms of Plants. Terrestrial Ecosystems-The Biomes Global Biogeography Natural Vegetation Structure and Life-Forms of Plants Terrestrial Ecosystems-The Biomes Natural Vegetation natural vegetation is the plant cover that develops with little or no human

More information

Unit 2 Text Worksheet # 2

Unit 2 Text Worksheet # 2 Unit 2 Text Worksheet # 2 Read Pages 74-77 1. Using fig. 5.1 on page 75 identify: Climatic Region the most widespread climatic region in the low latitudes two climatic subregions with dry conditions for

More information

Climate.tgt, Version: 1 1

Climate.tgt, Version: 1 1 Name: Key Concepts Choose the letter of the best answer. (5 points each) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Date: A city located in the middle of North America experiences extreme temperature changes during

More information

BIOMES. Definition of a Biome. Terrestrial referring to land. Climatically controlled sets of ecosystems. Characterized by distinct vegetation

BIOMES. Definition of a Biome. Terrestrial referring to land. Climatically controlled sets of ecosystems. Characterized by distinct vegetation BIOMES An Introduction to the Biomes of the World Definition of a Biome Terrestrial referring to land Climatically controlled sets of ecosystems Characterized by distinct vegetation 1 In a Biome There

More information

CLIMATE. UNIT TWO March 2019

CLIMATE. UNIT TWO March 2019 CLIMATE UNIT TWO March 2019 OUTCOME 9.2.1Demonstrate an understanding of the basic features of Canada s landscape and climate. identify and locate major climatic regions of Canada explain the characteristics

More information

Adopt a Drifter Lesson Plan by Mary Cook, Middle School Science Teacher, Ahlf Jr. High School, Searcy, Arkansas

Adopt a Drifter Lesson Plan by Mary Cook, Middle School Science Teacher, Ahlf Jr. High School, Searcy, Arkansas Adopt a Drifter Lesson Plan by Mary Cook, Middle School Science Teacher, Ahlf Jr. High School, Searcy, Arkansas Do Ocean Surface Currents Influence Climate? Objectives Students will construct climographs

More information

PART II. Physical Landscape Chapters 2 5 CLIMATE CLIMATE STUDYING CLIMATE R E M I N D E R S. PART II: People and their Physical Environment 10/26/2017

PART II. Physical Landscape Chapters 2 5 CLIMATE CLIMATE STUDYING CLIMATE R E M I N D E R S. PART II: People and their Physical Environment 10/26/2017 R E M I N D E R S Two required essays are due by Nov. 13, 2017. (A third may be used for extra credit in place of a Think Geographically essay.) ESSAY TOPIS (choose any two): ontributions of a noted geographer,

More information

Desertification : loss of productive potential due to human activity. Can happen in A climates as well as in arid climates

Desertification : loss of productive potential due to human activity. Can happen in A climates as well as in arid climates W, S,, m, 60 m 30 0 30 60 What do these all have in common? Small group question: What leaf shape/shedding habit do you expect to find in each of these and why? Tropical Monsoon (m) Found primarily along

More information

Chapter 6, Part Colonizers arriving in North America found extremely landscapes. It looked different to region showing great.

Chapter 6, Part Colonizers arriving in North America found extremely landscapes. It looked different to region showing great. Social Studies 9 Unit 1 Worksheet Chapter 6, Part 1. 1. Colonizers arriving in North America found extremely landscapes. It looked different to region showing great. 2. The Earth is years old and is composed

More information

How does the physical environment influence communities and ecosystems? Hoodoos in Cappadocia, Turkey

How does the physical environment influence communities and ecosystems? Hoodoos in Cappadocia, Turkey Biomes of the World How does the physical environment influence communities and ecosystems? Hoodoos in Cappadocia, Turkey ecosystems are shaped by: abiotic factors climate/weather space Rainfall Soil air

More information

Chapter 3: Study Guide

Chapter 3: Study Guide Chapter 3: Study Guide Multiple Choice 1. Places located in high latitudes have a. a very warm climate. b. the same weather as places in other latitudes. c. a mix of extremely hot and extremely cold weather.

More information

Where is the tropical zone? What are three biomes found in the tropical zone?

Where is the tropical zone? What are three biomes found in the tropical zone? Name CHAPTER 3 Class Date Climate 2 The Tropics SECTION BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: Where is the tropical zone? What are three biomes found

More information

Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2013 Weather

Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2013 Weather Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2013 Weather Radiation Convection Currents Winds Jet Streams Energy from the Sun reaches Earth as electromagnetic waves This energy fuels all life on Earth including the

More information

Physical Features of Monsoon Asia. 192 Unit 7 Teachers Curriculum Institute 60 N 130 E 140 E 150 E 60 E 50 N 160 E 40 N 30 N 150 E.

Physical Features of Monsoon Asia. 192 Unit 7 Teachers Curriculum Institute 60 N 130 E 140 E 150 E 60 E 50 N 160 E 40 N 30 N 150 E. 50 N 60 E 70 E 80 E 90 E 100 E 60 N 110 E 120 E 130 E 140 E 150 E 50 N 160 E 40 N 40 N 30 N 60 E 30 N 150 E Tropic of Cancer 20 N Tropic of Cancer 20 N 10 N 10 N 0 Equator 0 Equator 10 S 10 S 0 500 1,000

More information

Climax Vegetation is the natural vegetation in the last possible stage of vegetation development. Climax vegetation is stable and in balance with the

Climax Vegetation is the natural vegetation in the last possible stage of vegetation development. Climax vegetation is stable and in balance with the Climax Vegetation is the natural vegetation in the last possible stage of vegetation development. Climax vegetation is stable and in balance with the climatic conditions. It should change very little if

More information

Global Weather Trade Winds etc.notebook February 17, 2017

Global Weather Trade Winds etc.notebook February 17, 2017 Global Weather 1 north pole northern hemisphere equator southern hemisphere south pole 2 We have seasons because of the Earth's tilt The seasons are opposite in the northern and southern hemispheres winter

More information

Biosphere Organization

Biosphere Organization Biosphere Organization What is a biome? Biomes refer to a large region or area characterized by the following: 1. A particular climate pattern of the annual temperature and precipitation distribution,

More information

Mid-latitude Cyclones & Air Masses

Mid-latitude Cyclones & Air Masses Lab 9 Mid-latitude Cyclones & Air Masses This lab will introduce students to the patterns of surface winds around the center of a midlatitude cyclone of low pressure. The types of weather associated with

More information

(version 3) I. HumAN -Environment Interaction

(version 3) I. HumAN -Environment Interaction (version 3) I. HumAN -Environment Interaction A. Landforms 1. Earth s topography is made up of many different types of landforms. 2. While the planet is covered primarily with water, the four major types

More information

Lesson- 6 WEATHER AND CLIMATE

Lesson- 6 WEATHER AND CLIMATE Lesson- 6 WEATHER AND CLIMATE New Words 1. Heat Zones:- the division of the earth according to the climate. 2. Frigid:- the zone that is the coldest 3. Temperate:- the zone that is neither too hot nor

More information

4th Grade Social Studies First Nine Weeks

4th Grade Social Studies First Nine Weeks 4th Grade Social Studies First Nine Weeks Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1 Name the mountains that are located in the eastern United States.

More information

Chapter 1 Section 2. Land, Water, and Climate

Chapter 1 Section 2. Land, Water, and Climate Chapter 1 Section 2 Land, Water, and Climate Vocabulary 1. Landforms- natural features of the Earth s land surface 2. Elevation- height above sea level 3. Relief- changes in height 4. Core- most inner

More information

3. The map below shows an eastern portion of North America. Points A and B represent locations on the eastern shoreline.

3. The map below shows an eastern portion of North America. Points A and B represent locations on the eastern shoreline. 1. Most tornadoes in the Northern Hemisphere are best described as violently rotating columns of air surrounded by A) clockwise surface winds moving toward the columns B) clockwise surface winds moving

More information

Wind: Global Systems Chapter 10

Wind: Global Systems Chapter 10 Wind: Global Systems Chapter 10 General Circulation of the Atmosphere General circulation of the atmosphere describes average wind patterns and is useful for understanding climate Over the earth, incoming

More information

Weather Systems Study Guide:

Weather Systems Study Guide: Weather Systems Study Guide: 1. Draw a diagram of Earth s water cycle and label each part. 2. Explain how the water cycle works. 3. What happens in the troposphere and stratosphere? Atmosphere Level What

More information

What a Hurricane Needs to Develop

What a Hurricane Needs to Develop Weather Weather is the current atmospheric conditions, such as air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, cloud cover, precipitation, relative humidity, air pressure, etc. 8.10B: global patterns of atmospheric

More information

Fig Major air masses of the world

Fig Major air masses of the world Fig. 9.3 Major air masses of the world CLASSIFICATION FOUR BASIC CATEGORIES OF AIR MASSES: POLAR - P ARCTIC - A TROPICAL - T EQUATORIAL - E TWO DESIGNATIONS OF SURFACE IN SOURCE REGION MARITIME - m. CONTINENTAL

More information

CLIMATE DEFINED CLIMATE INFLUENCES STUDYING CLIMATE R E M I N D E R S. PART II: People and their 10/19/2018

CLIMATE DEFINED CLIMATE INFLUENCES STUDYING CLIMATE R E M I N D E R S. PART II: People and their 10/19/2018 R E M I N D E R S Two required essays are due by Oct. 30, 2018. (A third may be used for extra credit in place of a Think Geographically essay.) ESSAY TOPIS (choose any two): ontributions of a noted geographer,

More information

4 Changes in Climate. TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why is more land exposed during glacial periods than at other times?

4 Changes in Climate. TAKE A LOOK 2. Explain Why is more land exposed during glacial periods than at other times? Name Class CHAPTER 3 Date Climate 4 Changes in Climate SECTION National Science Education Standards BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: ES 1k, 2a

More information

Climates of Earth. Lesson Outline LESSON 1. A. What is climate? 1. is the long-term average weather conditions that occur in a particular region.

Climates of Earth. Lesson Outline LESSON 1. A. What is climate? 1. is the long-term average weather conditions that occur in a particular region. Lesson Outline LESSON 1 A. What is climate? 1. is the long-term average weather conditions that occur in a particular region. 2. Climate depends on how average weather conditions throughout the year. B.

More information

Landforms and Bodies of Water

Landforms and Bodies of Water Chapter 5, Section 1 For use with textbook pages 115 120. The Land Terms to Know divide A high point or ridge that determines the direction that rivers flow (page 118) headwaters The source waters of a

More information

Chapter 15: Weather and Climate

Chapter 15: Weather and Climate Chapter 15: Weather and Climate Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The short-term state of the atmosphere is called a. climate. c. water cycle.

More information

The Earth, the sun, the planets and the twinkling stars in the sky are all part of a galaxy, or family of stars. We call our galaxy the Milky Way

The Earth, the sun, the planets and the twinkling stars in the sky are all part of a galaxy, or family of stars. We call our galaxy the Milky Way Part One The Earth, the sun, the planets and the twinkling stars in the sky are all part of a galaxy, or family of stars. We call our galaxy the Milky Way because the lights from its billions of stars

More information

Unit 4: Terrestrial ecosystems and resources

Unit 4: Terrestrial ecosystems and resources Unit 4: Terrestrial ecosystems and resources Chapter 5: Climate and terrestrial biodiversity > Climate > Terrestrial Ecosystems Chapter 10: Sustaining biodiversity (ecosystem approach) Chapter 11: Sustaining

More information

UNIT 5: ECOLOGY Chapter 15: The Biosphere

UNIT 5: ECOLOGY Chapter 15: The Biosphere CORNELL NOTES Directions: You must create a minimum of 5 questions in this column per page (average). Use these to study your notes and prepare for tests and quizzes. Notes will be stamped after each assigned

More information

CLIMATE CLIMATE STUDYING CLIMATE. PART II: People and their 3/20/2018. GEOG 101 Part II People and their Physical Environment R E M I N D E R S

CLIMATE CLIMATE STUDYING CLIMATE. PART II: People and their 3/20/2018. GEOG 101 Part II People and their Physical Environment R E M I N D E R S Two required essays are due by March 27, 2018. (A third may be used for extra credit in place of a Think Geographically essay.) ESSAY TOPIS (choose any two): ontributions of a noted geographer, earth scientist

More information

Physical Geography. Ariel view of the Amazon Rainforest. A Look at the Seven Continents

Physical Geography. Ariel view of the Amazon Rainforest. A Look at the Seven Continents Physical Geography In this unit you will learn about general physical geography. The study of the Earth s surface features provides the setting for the human-environmental interactions and for the human

More information

Meteorology. Chapter 15 Worksheet 1

Meteorology. Chapter 15 Worksheet 1 Chapter 15 Worksheet 1 Meteorology Name: Circle the letter that corresponds to the correct answer 1) The Tropic of Cancer and the Arctic Circle are examples of locations determined by: a) measuring systems.

More information

National Meteorological Library and Archive

National Meteorological Library and Archive National Meteorological Library and Archive Fact sheet No. 4 Climate of the United Kingdom Causes of the weather in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom lies in the latitude of predominately westerly

More information

Objectives. Vocabulary. Describe different types of climate data. Recognize limits associated with the use of normals. Explain why climates vary.

Objectives. Vocabulary. Describe different types of climate data. Recognize limits associated with the use of normals. Explain why climates vary. Climate Objectives Describe different types of climate data. Recognize limits associated with the use of normals. Explain why climates vary. Vocabulary climatology climate normal tropics temperate zone

More information

Where is the tropical zone? What are three biomes found in the tropical zone?

Where is the tropical zone? What are three biomes found in the tropical zone? Name CHAPTER 17 Class Date SECTION 2 The Tropics BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: Where is the tropical zone? What are three biomes found in the

More information

Name Class Date. 2. What is the average weather condition in an area over a long period of time called? a. winter b. temperature c. climate d.

Name Class Date. 2. What is the average weather condition in an area over a long period of time called? a. winter b. temperature c. climate d. Skills Worksheet Directed Reading B Section: What Is Climate? CLIMATE VS. WEATHER 1. What kind of conditions vary from day to day? a. climate b. weather c. latitude d. biome 2. What is the average weather

More information

Weather and Climate 1. Elements of the weather

Weather and Climate 1. Elements of the weather Weather and Climate 1 affect = to have an effect on, influence, change altitude = the height of a place above the sea axis = the line around which an object rotates certain = special consist of = to be

More information

* We will go as a class to the bathroom at 8:18!

* We will go as a class to the bathroom at 8:18! Unpack/ Write down homework Turn in ANY papers from home Get computer & book boxes Work on Government Shortcut--DUE THURSDAY! Work on ANY unfinished work- DUE THURSDAY * We will go as a class to the bathroom

More information

Chapter 1 Study Guide

Chapter 1 Study Guide Chapter 1 Study Guide Reminders: Vocabulary quiz and test will be on Tuesday, September 6th. Complete study guide and bring completed to school Friday, September 2nd. You are NOT required to print the

More information