CHAPTER 5 REVIEW PACKET - GAS LAWS. I. The typical atmospheric pressure on top ofmt. Everest (29,028 ft) is 265 torr. Convert the pressure to:

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1 NAME:!Jt<J{,<'ii I!(f PERlOD: CHAPTER 5 REVIEW PACKET - GAS LAWS I. The typical atmospheric pressure on top ofmt. Everest (29,028 ft) is 265 torr. Convert the pressure to: (a) atmospheres,;j& J t7jrr? v i. O. fer;;{h. '1 _l/,~ (b) mm Hg 2. A fixed quantity of gas at 23.0oC exhibits a pressure of 735 torr and occupies a volume of 5.22 L. (a) Determine the volume the gas will occupy if the pressure is increased to 1.88 atm and the temperature held constant. J' 0 \t ij.!} r.s.: is (b) Determine the volume the gas will occupy if the temperature is increased to 165 C while the pressure is held constant. (S, ;).J){!J3f) V, \!J.,,)1(; - 'T J. 7,7~ L s, J ~ Y do cjt'j~ q"g

2 3. Nitrogen and hydrogen gas react to form ammonia gas as follows: N2 (g) + 3 H2 (g) -> 2 NH3 (g) I I I,.J.. L ;J"2. t.j L IJ 1-13 L ;J 11,j.: ~,L{ L f ILJJ L At a certain temperature and pressure, 1.20 L of N, reacts with 3.60 L of Hz. If all the N2 and H2 are consumed, what volume ofnh3, at the same temperature and pressure, will be produced? : 01 L DH3 J L f..1z. d). q L- 4. The Hindenburg was a hydrogen-filled dirigible that exploded in If the Hindenburg held 2.00 x 10 5 rrr' of hydrogen gas at 23.0 o C and 1.00 atm, what mass of hydrogen was present? / ~,O i. IO.sY\l\3 /L s \; ~ _3 J ;J,00 '1-'0 L ( 10 m n- fv' - :!2..T (/)( ~,O )I./OF-) t, 0 roll) ( ~q" ) 7 ',&b '{. 10 J- 5. A scuba diver's tank contains kg of 02 compressed into a volume of 2.30 L. (a) Calculate the gas pressure inside the tank at 9.00 o C. '\1...e. 00-". d- q y.. (0j 0L i.>l...p a~ I I,3 2, 0<j = ()L. (IlL, V a.3 (b) What volume would this oxygen occupy at 26.0 o C and atm? V. f]~1 P (q, 0(.,;).))(. of oj I)(;;flCf ).9S

3 6. Which gas is most dense at 1.00 atm and 298 K? (b) N20 ~ Explain: 1'3...t{t(,W 7. Calculate the density ofn02 gas at atm and 35.0 o C. 1'1 1 1 (,910)(4(.<01).!J d~ = 1~ r<-:r (, o8-~( )( JO.f) I, L 8. Calculate the molar mass of a gas if2.50g occupies L at 685 torr and 35.0 o C. M.: dill: (-,cj~:s) (, osl-ij(aoi) r,,~..s ) ( Chemical analysis of a gaseous compound showed that it contained 23.5% C, 1.98% H, and 74.5% F. At C, a O.lOOg sample of the compound exerts a pressure of 70.5 mm Hg in a 256 ml container. Determine the molar mass of the compound and its molecular formula. S c.. IJ ~ : I 1~c' z: I.. fl.j.cr"." () " CI-fF... L - j.). Q I. ~1N~tNI ~..... LXa 00.0l. t+ - ~I Ii /' q ~ 1.0/ ;f/.o : C?i{,S- t- c: 3.Gi2 - C = d (.,_,06 ) (. )( ), ;} SI; 08.1/ &9$, 3 C.: Il.GI H: 1,0 I r- sf.oo S/.O 2.. ( "77()~/ ) : 51 '-'---'._.._._

4 10. Magnesium can be used as a "getter" in evacuated enclosures, to react with the last traces of oxygen. (The magnesium is usually heated by passing an electric current through a wire or ribbon of the metal.) If an enclosure of L has a partial pressure of O 2 of 3.50 x 10-6 torr at 27.00C, what mass of magnesium will react according to the following equation? 2 Mg (s) + 02 (g)... 2 MgO (s) s: 3, 50 Y.IO-~ -/, fco.sc)0~1 Ss X 10-9 )lyo (if. <.0 os.;) '" 31.$8'" (0 - '1)(.,J.f,,1) () 0,1...: (,082..1) ( 3(6) -If '7. itf,)js /17 'f. 10 -Ill f 0,j 11. The metabolic oxidation of glucose, C6H1206, in our bodies produces C02, which is expelled from our lungs as a gas: Calculate the volume of C02 produced at body temperature consumed in this reaction. ~i..{cq1,;jif. Sj Ct-i-I IJ _ cj (., 1 "",jj (\ I-f.. (J" ~I1UJ.COJ (37.0 C) and.970 atm when 24.5g of glucose is V= C. S-IS lfsos-, $0)(.032.1)(0510),.Cf70 d. i. <-( L 12. Hydrogen gas is produced when zinc reacts with sulfuric acid: If 159 ml of wet H2 is collected over water at 24.0 o C and a barometric pressure of738 torr, how many grams of Zn have been consumed? Look up the water vapor pressure in the tables in the text. e.: 73f? torr ~ a s. 3K tvrr ;;- 7;J, "d-~rr = I (. q<l if.:os2.~j2.)( isq) (.o~~,)(~'11~ qy/ M)S 2..{;32 ~ _.._-_._..._._.. -._ _.--._-_._.. "-_._ _ _...---_._-

5 13. A mixture containing mol He(g), mol Ne(g), and mol Ar(g) is confined in a 7.00 L vessel at 25.0 C. (a) Calculate the partial pressure of each of the gases in the mixture. (,SOY) ( ) (l.cin '7.00 I, 87 (t,~ PrJ (. :;l\:,)(.d'21')(lfln_ 7.00 ~ I. I()oq" ( -=: I, I Cl (.ij~ PAr (. 103) ( of 2. I ) ( at) J- ) ;: 01 :3S'1 ot q ~17 I «-, 3ftOcJ;/j.'j,.'L ; (b) Calculate the total pressure of the mixture. 14. A quantity of N, gas originally held at 4.75 atm pressure in a 1.00 L container at 26.0 o C is transferred to a 10.0 L container at 20.0 C. A quantity of 02 gas originally at 5.25 atm and C and a 5.00 L container is transferred to the same container. What is the total pressure in the new container? T. p,v,t2.- 'T 'o(, v e V J ({ VI- ;:.- '2.- ('1, '7.\) (LOC) (Z C 13") '(,)A tj) (to. 0) = f} ft,-,- I I V I I J. ;. rs, J : ) ( S. ()(»)( ;;.13) (;},C(1) (IIJ, 0) 15. Place the following gases in order of increasing average molecular speed at C : Ne, HBr, S02, NF 3, and CO. u(,h'tbt WI.As'''s i'ii\.o\lqtl-'lg FA..S'TSS,.-...

6 16. Calculate the nns velocity ofnf3 molecules at 25.0 o C. (.:!!:"E. ;ArMJ :0 1 1'1.3 (3".31 t{)(.;z..l/ f \ '11.0/ "-/0-3 : A gas of unknown molecular mass was allowed to effuse through a small opening under constantpressure conditions. It required 105s for I.OOL of the gas to effuse. Under identical experimental conditions, it required 31.0s for I.OOL of 02 to effuse. Calculate the molar mass of the unknown gas. ~ ~ iz: :1 Mt 3/ = l~ - 3\,31,00 i -. IO,S ~ /'\-1 ~ 3'-:7 ( ~ )2- rvll :. \ ~I -:;:;:0 t~ 18. Calculate the pressure that CCI 4 will exert at 40.0oC if 1.00 mol occupies 28.0L, assuming that (a) CCI 4 obeys the ideal gas equation f : fi e.r V ;:.-. ( j i 00 ) (. of 011) (3( 3).).f, 0 (b) CCI 4 obeys the van der Waals equation h. /3f3 tt( t) a (l.ooh. og2.l) (.313) -,;I t-. () - [(1.00)(.13k1) J z:...._..._-_.._._.. -_._ _._.._----

7 O. I H{ s: 13. A mixture containing mol He(g) mol Ne(g), and mol Ar(g) is confined in a 7.00 L vessel at 25.0 C. (a) Calculate the partial pressure of each of the gases in the mixture. (.S3f') (.Q8LI '7.1)0 )(lflf) 'lg7~ PtJe (. 3IS)(. cr21)( lj}&-) '7, co -.- 1/001.,1 c: if t l:j (.ti~.' {JAr (, 103)(. C~ 2.. \) (~.t.).n - '" /,00 (b) Calculate the total pressure of the mixture..- 0, :3 s1q Cj ~17/«.- 3&Ocd1'VL (~(;lt P A quantity of N, gas originally held at 4.75 atm pressure in a 1.00 L container at 26.0 o C is transferred to a 10.0 L container at 20.0 C. A quantity of 02 gas originally at 5.25 atrn and 26.0 o C and a 5.00 L container is transferred to the same container. What is the total pressure in the new container? P'V, «v. 'I, ;: P. V,Tz.- (Lj, -7.n (1,00) (zq 3) 'l.. - T'\{', 'V ; (:;A") ({O, 0) s: o I t/ ~Sair;;!?roT " r, f \1 'T I I J. (S, J 5: ) ( S. (J () )( ~ 13).: ; d. ' s 7 a.-ti'l1. ;; Tt\'g. (;}Cf1) (11),0) 15. Place the following gases in order of increasing average molecular speed at 25,OoC : Ne, HBr, S02, NF 3, and CO. L\G\-\ITIT I'H/\S.S ;t.tovq T}-\G FASTEST

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