Alexey Kuznetsov. Armagh Observatory

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Alexey Kuznetsov. Armagh Observatory"

Transcription

1 Alexey Kuznetsov Armagh Observatory

2 Outline of the talk Solar radio emission History Instruments and methods Results of observations Radio emission of planets Overview / history / instruments Radio emission of Jupiter Radio emission of other planets Radio emission of brown dwarfs Overview / instruments Results of observations 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 2

3 : first attempts to detect radio emission from the Sun 1890: Thomas Edison : Johannes Wilsing & Julius Scheiner (Potsdam Observatory) 1901: Charles Nordmann (Observatory of Nice) : Karl Jansky (Bell Telephone Laboratories) : John Kraus & Arthur Adel (University of Michigan) No emission was detected! Reasons: Insufficient sensitivity. The experiments were performed during solar minima. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 3

4 1942: discovery of solar radio emission February 26-27, 1942: radar stations along the south coast of England (at the frequency of about 60 MHz) were jammed by radio signals from an unknown source. James Hey (Army Operational Research Group) identified the Sun as the emission source. He also found that the emission was associated with a large group of sunspots. 1942: George Southworth (Bell Telephone Laboratories) detected solar radio emission at 3 and 10 GHz. 1943: Grote Reber (an amateur radio astronomer) detected solar radio emission at 160 MHz. He was the first to publish solar radio observations. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 4

5 After 1945: rapid progress in solar radio astronomy!" # $% & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 5

6 Why solar radio observations are important? What can we learn from them? Radio observations allow us to study the parameters of magnetic field and plasma in the solar corona, where observations at other wavelengths usually fail due to low plasma density. Radio emission of solar flares is produced by the high-energy electrons that are the key factor in development of the flares. Therefore, radio observations allow us to study the parameters of these electrons. Disadvantages of radio observations: Spatial resolution is usually low. Emission mechanisms are rather complicated. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 6

7 Frequencies of solar radio bursts: from ~10 MHz to tens of GHz. Angular resolution of a telescope: λ θ, d where is the wavelength and d is the diameter of the antenna (mirror). To achieve the resolution of 10 arcsec, we need:!' ( $ ) Total intensity of solar radio bursts: W max < 10-7 W / m 2. W radio / W optical < Frequency 100 MHz 1 GHz 10 GHz Diameter 62 km 6.2 km 620 m 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 7

8 Radiometers / radiopolarimeters Full-disk observations * + " +, '- &. $/ $ 0 $ $ 0 $ $ &, '' 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 8

9 Spectrographs / spectropolarimeters Full-disk observations A number of frequency channels 1-2 GHz GHz GHz 4 & & % 8 ' & ' 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 9

10 Radioheliographs (radio interferometers) Multi-antenna instruments Interferometric methods are used to reconstruct images * + " / / 2 # +, '- & &. 2 % 8 '* " $ 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 10

11 Radioheliographs (radio interferometers) Multi-antenna instruments Interferometric methods are used to reconstruct images + " : /.) / 2 9) / 2 # +, '- & &. % 8 ' " : $ 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 11

12 Radioheliographs (radio interferometers) Multi-antenna instruments Interferometric methods are used to reconstruct images * ; " 7. / 2 2 9/ 2 # +, '- &. 2 < 2 = 4 5 &. < / % 8 '* " 4 7 ) = 4 5 $ 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 12

13 Components of solar radio emission 1. Emission of the quiet Sun. free-free emission of thermal electrons (T ~ 10 6 K). 2. Slowly-varying component. is produced due to cyclotron radiation of thermal electrons in strong magnetic fields of the active regions; demonstrates a very good correlation with the sunspot number. 3. Sporadic radio emission. is associated with flares; is produced by nonthermal electrons. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 13

14 > 7 Standard model of a solar flare % " ' Electron energy: up to ~10 MeV. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 14

15 Schematic spectrum of solar radio bursts (Dulk 1985) plasma emission gyrosynchrotron emission 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 15

16 Low-frequency (metric) emission The longest history of observations. Five basic spectral classes of metric bursts are known (type I, II, III, IV, and V). Type II and III bursts can be indicators of geoeffective factors. > 8 ' & 7 ', ' + & ( ) 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 16

17 Type III bursts Short narrowband bursts with fast frequency drift (towards lower frequencies). Harmonic structure is sometimes observed. Are produced by escaping subrelativistic (0.1c 0.5c) electron beams on open magnetic field lines. Can extend to very low frequencies (into interplanetary space).? & +, + 4 7!!!!+ & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 17

18 Type II bursts Short narrowband bursts with slow frequency drift (towards lower frequencies). Harmonic structure is often observed. Most likely, are produced at the fronts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs).? & +, A +, + 6 % # # 4 # 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 18

19 High-frequency (microwave) emission Incoherent gyrosynchrotron mechanism dominates. The emission is produced by trapped electrons in closed magnetic configurations. & 7 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 19

20 NoRH images of the solar flare on 22 August $ $ $ September 2012 Armagh Observatory 20

21 NoRH images of the solar flare on 25 September $ $ $ September 2012 Armagh Observatory 21

22 Typical spectrum of solar gyrosynchrotron burst * " B & ''/ = / September 2012 Armagh Observatory 22

23 Decimetric radio bursts (300 MHz 5 GHz) The emission is produced by trapped electrons in closed magnetic configurations. Plasma radiation mechanism dominates: unstable electron beam plasma waves radio emission. % 8 ' & & + & +, September 2012 Armagh Observatory 23

24 Fine spectral structure of decimetric radio bursts: zebra patterns C " , + - & % 7 " : & + : + C " , + 4 & & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 24

25 Fine spectral structure of decimetric radio bursts: fibers? & ''+ + & +, + 4 & & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 25

26 Fine spectral structure of decimetric radio bursts: spikes? & ' +, + B 8 /? & ' +, + : & D 7 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 26

27 Coming soon New or upgraded solar-oriented radio telescopes: Upgraded Siberian Solar Radio Telescope Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph General-purpose radio instruments: Expanded Very Large Array Low-Frequency Array 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 27

28 Planetary radio emission Ionospheric cutoff f < f c f c 10 MHz f > f c Ionosphere 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 28

29 Planetary radio emission Typical frequencies Earth: Jupiter: Saturn: Uranus: ~ khz up to 40 MHz (maximum at ~15 MHz) ~20 khz 1.2 MHz ~ khz Neptune: ~ khz Mercury, Venus, Mars: no significant radio emission Comparative spectra of planetary auroral radio emissions (Zarka 1998). 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 29

30 Discovery of Jovian radio emission 1955: Bernard Burke and Kenneth Franklin (Carnegie Institution) accidentally discovered radio emission from Jupiter (at the frequency of 22.2 MHz) using the Mills Cross Array. The discovery was made during observations of the Crab Nebula (as a test source). However, at that time Jupiter was located nearby Later, it was found that Jovian radio emission was observed earlier by different researchers, but not recognized. = % 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 30

31 Instruments for planetary radio astronomy * ;? % - & +. 2 / 2 = 4 5 % 8 ' & ', 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 31

32 Instruments for planetary radio astronomy E : " : E : " / / & +.1 / = 4 5 % 8 ' & + & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 32

33 Jovian decametric radiation (DAM) Frequency range: ~3 40 GHz. Average intensity (normalized to 1 AU distance): W m -2 Hz -1 = 10 3 sfu. 100% elliptical polarization. Strongly modulated by the planet rotation and the orbital phase of Io. % & ', +, + * ;? % F / September 2012 Armagh Observatory 33

34 Jovian decametric radiation (DAM) C!& +, + * ;? % ( G(, 4 / C # & + + '? % = '& '!+ & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 34

35 Jovian decametric radiation: source model The emission is generated at the Io flux tube. Emission mechanism: electron-cyclotron maser instability. Emission frequency: ff B = B (the magnetic field of B = 14 G corresponds to the cyclotron frequency of f B = 39.2 MHz). Plasma density is very low ( 5 cm -3 ). 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 35

36 Fine spectral structure of Jovian decametric radiation: S-bursts Duration (at a fixed frequency): tens of ms. Bandwidth (at a fixed time): up to 200 khz. Fast frequency drift (usually towards lower frequencies). Intensity (normalized to 1 AU distance): up to W m -2 Hz -1 = 10 5 sfu. > 8 + & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 36

37 Other components of Jovian radio emission Hectometric and kilometric radiations maser emission plasma emission (?) + & ', +, + & 7 & '+ 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 37

38 Other components of Jovian radio emission Decimetric radiation Frequency range: 100 MHz 10 GHz. Intensity: ~10 5 times lower than that of DAM. Produced by high-energy (tens of MeV) electrons in Jovian radiation belts. Emission mechanism: synchrotron. 5 GHz 7 ', H 6 % / September 2012 Armagh Observatory 38

39 Instruments for planetary radio astronomy Voyager 1 & 2 FAST Cassini 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 39

40 Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) of the Earth +, '% " B / 2 2 / Emission frequency: ~ khz (maximum at ~250 khz). +, '% " = & / 2 2 ) Produced at the heights of km. Produced at the magnetic longitudes of September 2012 Armagh Observatory 40

41 Auroral kilometric radiation of Saturn (SKR) Emission frequency: ~ khz (maximum at khz). Produced at the heights of km. +, ' " 6 / 2 Produced at the magnetic longitudes of September 2012 Armagh Observatory 41

42 Auroral kilometric radiations of Uranus and Neptune +, E & +, * & 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 42

43 Radio emission from exoplanets Not yet detected! But is expected to be detected soon with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 43

44 Radio emission from ultracool dwarfs Very low-mass stars (spectral class M7, temperature < 2700 K). Brown dwarfs (spectral classes L, T, Y). Ultracool dwarfs Neutral planetary-like atmospheres instead of ionized solar- and stellar-like coronae. Radio emission was occasionally detected in To date, ~10% of M7-L3 objects have been detected in radio. The emission frequency: a few GHz (currently detected at 1-20 GHz). The emission intensity can be very high much higher than that of the solar or planetary radio emission. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 44

45 Physical characteristics of ultracool dwarfs Radius: R ~ R Jupiter (~ 0.1 R ); Mass: M < 100 M Jupiter (< 0.1 M ). 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 45

46 Instruments for stellar radio astronomy H 6 7 % H 6 % 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 46

47 Instruments for stellar radio astronomy % + " 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 47

48 M9 dwarf TVLM ) C " 7 &, H 6 % Emission intensity (normalized to 1 AU distance): up to W m -2 Hz -1 = sfu. Total emission power: 10 4 times higher than that of Jupiter. Pulse period (1.96 hr) coincides with the stellar rotation period. ~100% circular polarization. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 48

49 L3.5 dwarf 2MASS J Temperature of the dwarf: ~1900 K Emission intensity (normalized to 1 AU distance): up to W m -2 Hz -1 = sfu. Polarization degree: > 60%. The emission period (3.08 hr) seems to correspond to the rotation period. " 7 &, H 6 % 4 / September 2012 Armagh Observatory 49

50 M7 dwarf 2MASS J Average emission intensity (normalized to 1 AU distance): W m -2 Hz -1 = 10 6 sfu. Polarization degree: ~25%. The emission period (3.89 hr) seems to correspond to the rotation period. " 7 &, H 6 % = 6 / 2 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 50

51 T6.5 dwarf 2MASS J Temperature of the dwarf: ~900 K. Emission intensity (normalized to 1 AU distance): W m -2 Hz -1 = 10 6 sfu. Polarization degree: up to 90%.? 7 &, % + " & I ( 5 5 / 2 / 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 51

52 M8.5 dwarf DENIS-P J Power-law spectrum indicates the gyrosynchrotron emission mechanism. " & % & : % ", / 2 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 52

53 Source model Radio emission from ultracool dwarfs: a scaled-up analogue of the planetary auroral radio emissions? Magnetic field is highly asymmetric (similar to that of Uranus or Neptune). Short periodic radio bursts: maser emission mechanism; required magnetic field: 3000 G. Quiescent or slowly varying component: gyrosynchrotron emission mechanism; required magnetic field: ~100 G. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 53

54 Why radio observations of ultracool dwarfs are important? What can we learn from them? Radio (and some optical) observations indicate the presence of very strong magnetic fields at ultracool dwarfs. The origin of these magnetic fields is unknown. The mechanisms proposed for the Sun do not work at low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Radio observations are currently the only way to study the magnetic field structure at ultracool dwarfs. These results are very important for the further development of the stellar (and, possibly, solar) dynamo theory. 21 September 2012 Armagh Observatory 54

55

Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in. Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts

Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in. Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts Short title: Frequency-dependent zebra-pattern polarization Kazutaka Kaneda 1, H. Misawa 1, K. Iwai 2, F. Tsuchiya 1,

More information

Gregg Hallinan National Radio Astronomy Observatory & UC Berkeley

Gregg Hallinan National Radio Astronomy Observatory & UC Berkeley Gregg Hallinan National Radio Astronomy Observatory & UC Berkeley E-mail: gregg@astro.berkeley.edu Stephen White University of Maryland The EVLA: A New Era in Stellar Radio Astronomy EVLA Continuum point-source

More information

Lecture 7: Radio Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections I

Lecture 7: Radio Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections I Lecture 7: Radio Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections I Hale COLLAborative Graduate Education (COLLAGE) Course 2017 Prof. Bin Chen (New Jersey Institute of Technology) Lectures 7-8 outline Radio astronomy

More information

Astronomy. Chapter 15 Stellar Remnants: White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars, and Black Holes

Astronomy. Chapter 15 Stellar Remnants: White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars, and Black Holes Astronomy Chapter 15 Stellar Remnants: White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars, and Black Holes are hot, compact stars whose mass is comparable to the Sun's and size to the Earth's. A. White dwarfs B. Neutron stars

More information

Particle Acceleration and Transport on the Sun

Particle Acceleration and Transport on the Sun Particle Acceleration and Transport on the Sun New Perspectives at Radio Wavelengths An Astro2010 White Paper Prepared by T. S. Bastian 1, G. Emslie 2, G. Fleishman 3, D. E. Gary 3, G. Holman 4, H. Hudson

More information

Clicker Question: Clicker Question: Clicker Question:

Clicker Question: Clicker Question: Clicker Question: Test results Last day to drop without a grade is Feb 29 Grades posted in cabinet and online F D C B A In which direction would the Earth move if the Sun s gravitational force were suddenly removed from

More information

The Dynamic Radio Sky

The Dynamic Radio Sky The Dynamic Radio Sky Exoplanet Bursts, Lunar Neutrinos, and other Exotica Joseph Lazio (Naval Research Laboratory SKA Program Development Office) Who Cares? Radio transients are like butterfly collecting.

More information

Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life

Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life Review of last class Introduction to Astronomy Contents of today s lecture Quiz time Review Review 1 n Science is a way of producing

More information

Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre Answers to worksheets

Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre Answers to worksheets Scouts Planet Pavilion Questions 1. Jupiter Mercury Earth Saturn Mars Neptune Venus Uranus 2. How many planets are there in the Solar System? 8 3. Which planet is orbiting the Sun the quickest? Mercury

More information

Radio Emission from the Sun Observed by LOFAR and SKA

Radio Emission from the Sun Observed by LOFAR and SKA Radio Emission from the Sun Observed by LOFAR and SKA Gottfried Mann Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP) An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam, Germany e-mail: GMann@aip.de September 2011 LOFAR

More information

Chapter 26. Objectives. Describe characteristics of the universe in terms of time, distance, and organization

Chapter 26. Objectives. Describe characteristics of the universe in terms of time, distance, and organization Objectives Describe characteristics of the universe in terms of time, distance, and organization Identify the visible and nonvisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum Compare refracting telescopes

More information

Coriolis Effect - the apparent curved paths of projectiles, winds, and ocean currents

Coriolis Effect - the apparent curved paths of projectiles, winds, and ocean currents Regents Earth Science Unit 5: Astronomy Models of the Universe Earliest models of the universe were based on the idea that the Sun, Moon, and planets all orbit the Earth models needed to explain how the

More information

The Solar Atmosphere at Radio Wavelengths

The Solar Atmosphere at Radio Wavelengths Stellar Coronae in the Chandra and XMM-Newton Era ASP Conference Series, Vol. TBD, 21 F. Favata & J. Drake The Solar Atmosphere at Radio Wavelengths Stephen M. White Department of Astronomy, University

More information

HNRS 227 Fall 2006 Chapter 13. What is Pluto? What is a Planet? There are two broad categories of planets: Terrestrial and Jovian

HNRS 227 Fall 2006 Chapter 13. What is Pluto? What is a Planet? There are two broad categories of planets: Terrestrial and Jovian Key Points of Chapter 13 HNRS 227 Fall 2006 Chapter 13 The Solar System presented by Prof. Geller 24 October 2006 Planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune Dwarf Planets Pluto,

More information

AST 2010: Descriptive Astronomy EXAM 2 March 3, 2014

AST 2010: Descriptive Astronomy EXAM 2 March 3, 2014 AST 2010: Descriptive Astronomy EXAM 2 March 3, 2014 DO NOT open the exam until instructed to. Please read through the instructions below and fill out your details on the Scantron form. Instructions 1.

More information

FINE STRUCTURE IN THE SPECTRA OF SOLAR RADIO BURSTS. By G. R. A. ELLIS* [Manu8cript received September 19, 1968]

FINE STRUCTURE IN THE SPECTRA OF SOLAR RADIO BURSTS. By G. R. A. ELLIS* [Manu8cript received September 19, 1968] FINE STRUCTURE IN THE SPECTRA OF SOLAR RADIO BURSTS By G. R. A. ELLIS* [Manu8cript received September 19, 1968] Summary Observations are described of solar radio burst spectra in the frequency range 25-100

More information

Review III. ASTR 371, Fall Jovian Planets and Rings (Lecture Notes 9; Chap 12, 14)

Review III. ASTR 371, Fall Jovian Planets and Rings (Lecture Notes 9; Chap 12, 14) ASTR 371, Fall 2016 Review III 9. Jovian Planets and Rings (Lecture Notes 9; Chap 12, 14) 9.1-2 Introduction, Motion a. Carefully study the data for the Jovian planets. Must know the general properties

More information

Occurrence characteristics of Saturn s radio burst

Occurrence characteristics of Saturn s radio burst Occurrence characteristics of Saturn s radio burst D. Maruno 1, Y. Kasaba 1, T. Kimura 2, A. Morioka 1, B. Cecconi 3 1 Department of Geophysics, Tohoku University 2 ISAS, JAXA 3 LESIA, Observatorire de

More information

Fine Structure in Jovian Decametric Emission: LWA1 Observations. Chuck Higgins, Middle Tennessee State University Tracy Clarke, Naval Research Lab

Fine Structure in Jovian Decametric Emission: LWA1 Observations. Chuck Higgins, Middle Tennessee State University Tracy Clarke, Naval Research Lab Fine Structure in Jovian Decametric Emission: Collaborators: Kazumasa Imai, Kochi National College of Technology, Japan Francisco Reyes, U. of Florida Jim Thieman, NASA/GSFC Masafumi Imai, Kyoto University

More information

SOLAR SYSTEM NOTES. Surface of the Sun appears granulated: 10/2/2015 ENERGY TRANSFERS RADIATION FROM THE SUN

SOLAR SYSTEM NOTES. Surface of the Sun appears granulated: 10/2/2015 ENERGY TRANSFERS RADIATION FROM THE SUN SOLAR SYSTEM NOTES 10.7.15 ENERGY TRANSFERS Radiation - a process in which energy travels through vacuum (without a medium) Conduction a process in which energy travels through a medium Convection - The

More information

The Jovian Planets. The Jovian planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

The Jovian Planets. The Jovian planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune The Jovian planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune Their masses are large compared with terrestrial planets, from 15 to 320 times the Earth s mass They are gaseous Low density All of them have rings

More information

Which of the following correctly describes the meaning of albedo?

Which of the following correctly describes the meaning of albedo? Which of the following correctly describes the meaning of albedo? A) The lower the albedo, the more light the surface reflects, and the less it absorbs. B) The higher the albedo, the more light the surface

More information

RE-VISITING SATURNIAN KILOMETRIC RADIATION WITH ULYSSES/URAP

RE-VISITING SATURNIAN KILOMETRIC RADIATION WITH ULYSSES/URAP RE-VISITING SATURNIAN KILOMETRIC RADIATION WITH ULYSSES/URAP A. Lecacheux, P. Galopeau, and M. Aubier Abstract Due to its excellent sensitivity, the URAP radio astronomy experiment aboard the interplanetary

More information

Exoplanet searches in Radio : Theory & Observations from UTR-2 to LOFAR/SKA

Exoplanet searches in Radio : Theory & Observations from UTR-2 to LOFAR/SKA Exoplanet searches in Radio : Theory & Observations from UTR-2 to LOFAR/SKA P. Zarka LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, 92190 Meudon, philippe.zarka@obspm.fr Jupiter LF

More information

PROCESSING OF TAB DATA FROM UTR-2 IN THE PIPELINE MODE

PROCESSING OF TAB DATA FROM UTR-2 IN THE PIPELINE MODE PROCESSING OF TAB DATA FROM UTR-2 IN THE PIPELINE MODE I. VASYLIEVA, P. ZARKA, V. ZAKHARENKO et al. LESIA & Institute of Radio Astronomy of NAS of Ukraine Radio astronomy in Ukraine: covering the entire

More information

Lecture Outlines. Chapter 15. Astronomy Today 8th Edition Chaisson/McMillan Pearson Education, Inc.

Lecture Outlines. Chapter 15. Astronomy Today 8th Edition Chaisson/McMillan Pearson Education, Inc. Lecture Outlines Chapter 15 Astronomy Today 8th Edition Chaisson/McMillan Chapter 15 Exoplanets Units of Chapter 15 15.1 Modeling Planet Formation 15.2 Solar System Regularities and Irregularities 15.3

More information

Astro 1010 Planetary Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 3

Astro 1010 Planetary Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 3 Astro 1010 Planetary Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 3 Chapter 6 1. Which of the following statements is false? a) Refraction is the bending of light when it passes from one medium to another. b) Mirrors

More information

Habitability Outside the Solar System. A discussion of Bennett & Shostak Chapter 11 HNRS 228 Dr. H. Geller

Habitability Outside the Solar System. A discussion of Bennett & Shostak Chapter 11 HNRS 228 Dr. H. Geller Habitability Outside the Solar System A discussion of Bennett & Shostak Chapter 11 HNRS 228 Dr. H. Geller 1 Chapter Overview Distant Suns (11.1) Life cycle of stars and their habitability zones Extrasolar

More information

Final States of a Star

Final States of a Star Pulsars Final States of a Star 1. White Dwarf If initial star mass < 8 MSun or so. (and remember: Maximum WD mass is 1.4 MSun, radius is about that of the Earth) 2. Neutron Star If initial mass > 8 MSun

More information

Number of Stars: 100 billion (10 11 ) Mass : 5 x Solar masses. Size of Disk: 100,000 Light Years (30 kpc)

Number of Stars: 100 billion (10 11 ) Mass : 5 x Solar masses. Size of Disk: 100,000 Light Years (30 kpc) THE MILKY WAY GALAXY Type: Spiral galaxy composed of a highly flattened disk and a central elliptical bulge. The disk is about 100,000 light years (30kpc) in diameter. The term spiral arises from the external

More information

ASTRONOMY QUIZ NUMBER 1

ASTRONOMY QUIZ NUMBER 1 ASTRONOMY QUIZ NUMBER. You read in an astronomy atlas that an object has a negative right ascension. You immediately conclude that A) the object is located in the Southern Sky. B) the object is located

More information

The Solar Gravitational Lens: It is out there can we use it?

The Solar Gravitational Lens: It is out there can we use it? A talk at the KISS Workshop Science and Enabling Technologies to Explore the Interstellar Medium (ISM) September 8, 2014, Caltech The Solar Gravitational Lens: It is out there can we use it? Slava G. Turyshev

More information

Edmonds Community College Astronomy 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Exam # 2

Edmonds Community College Astronomy 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Exam # 2 Edmonds Community College Astronomy 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Exam # 2 Instructor: L. M. Khandro 1. Relatively speaking, objects with high temperatures emit their peak radiation in short wavelengths

More information

OUR SOLAR SYSTEM. James Martin. Facebook.com/groups/AstroLSSC Twitter.com/AstroLSSC

OUR SOLAR SYSTEM. James Martin. Facebook.com/groups/AstroLSSC Twitter.com/AstroLSSC OUR SOLAR SYSTEM James Martin Facebook.com/groups/AstroLSSC Twitter.com/AstroLSSC It s time for the human race to enter the solar system. -Dan Quayle Structure of the Solar System Our Solar System contains

More information

FASR and Radio Measurements Of Coronal Magnetic Fields. Stephen White University of Maryland

FASR and Radio Measurements Of Coronal Magnetic Fields. Stephen White University of Maryland FASR and Radio Measurements Of Coronal Magnetic Fields Stephen White University of Maryland Radio Emission and the Coronal Magnetic Field The range of magnetic fields in the corona is such that electrons

More information

P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center Russian Academy of Sciences S.A. Lavochkin Association, Roscosmos RADIOASTRON

P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center Russian Academy of Sciences S.A. Lavochkin Association, Roscosmos RADIOASTRON P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center Russian Academy of Sciences S.A. Lavochkin Association, Roscosmos RADIOASTRON The Ground Space Interferometer: radio telescope much larger than the Earth

More information

INSIDE LAB 9: Classification of Stars and Other Celestial Objects

INSIDE LAB 9: Classification of Stars and Other Celestial Objects INSIDE LAB 9: Classification of Stars and Other Celestial Objects OBJECTIVE: To become familiar with the classification of stars by spectral type, and the classification of celestial objects such as galaxies.

More information

Astronomy Ch. 22 Neutron Stars and Black Holes. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Astronomy Ch. 22 Neutron Stars and Black Holes. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Period: Date: Astronomy Ch. 22 Neutron Stars and Black Holes MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) In a neutron star, the core

More information

October 19, NOTES Solar System Data Table.notebook. Which page in the ESRT???? million km million. average.

October 19, NOTES Solar System Data Table.notebook. Which page in the ESRT???? million km million. average. Celestial Object: Naturally occurring object that exists in space. NOT spacecraft or man-made satellites Which page in the ESRT???? Mean = average Units = million km How can we find this using the Solar

More information

The Sun s Dynamic Atmosphere

The Sun s Dynamic Atmosphere Lecture 16 The Sun s Dynamic Atmosphere Jiong Qiu, MSU Physics Department Guiding Questions 1. What is the temperature and density structure of the Sun s atmosphere? Does the atmosphere cool off farther

More information

Applications of Statistical Optics

Applications of Statistical Optics Applications of Statistical Optics Radio Astronomy Michelson Stellar Interferometry Rotational Shear Interferometer (RSI) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Apps of Stat Optics p-1 Radio Telescope (Very

More information

Stellar Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 3

Stellar Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 3 Stellar Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 3 Chapter 7 1. A protostar is formed by a) the rapid expansion of gas from an exploding star. b) the gravitational collapse of a rotating interstellar cloud.

More information

Space Science Jeopardy!

Space Science Jeopardy! Space Science Jeopardy! Structure of the Universe Stars & HR Diagram Seasons, Tides, Phases, Eclipses Astronomical Bodies The Sun & Gravity 10 10 10 10 10 20 20 20 20 20 30 30 30 30 30 40 40 40 40 40 50

More information

1 A= one Angstrom = 1 10 cm

1 A= one Angstrom = 1 10 cm Our Star : The Sun )Chapter 10) The sun is hot fireball of gas. We observe its outer surface called the photosphere: We determine the temperature of the photosphere by measuring its spectrum: The peak

More information

McMath-Pierce Adaptive Optics Overview. Christoph Keller National Solar Observatory, Tucson

McMath-Pierce Adaptive Optics Overview. Christoph Keller National Solar Observatory, Tucson McMath-Pierce Adaptive Optics Overview Christoph Keller National Solar Observatory, Tucson Small-Scale Structures on the Sun 1 arcsec Important astrophysical scales (pressure scale height in photosphere,

More information

PHASE CONNECTING MULTI-EPOCH RADIO DATA FOR THE ULTRACOOL DWARF TVLM

PHASE CONNECTING MULTI-EPOCH RADIO DATA FOR THE ULTRACOOL DWARF TVLM PHASE CONNECTING MULTI-EPOCH RADIO DATA FOR THE ULTRACOOL DWARF TVLM 513-46546 J.G. Doyle 1, A. Antonova 1,2, G. Hallinan 3, A. Golden 3 ABSTRACT Radio observations for a number of ultracool dwarfs show

More information

Early Theories. Early astronomers believed that the sun, planets and stars orbited Earth (geocentric model) Developed by Aristotle

Early Theories. Early astronomers believed that the sun, planets and stars orbited Earth (geocentric model) Developed by Aristotle Planetary Motion Early Theories Early astronomers believed that the sun, planets and stars orbited Earth (geocentric model) Developed by Aristotle Stars appear to move around Earth Observations showed

More information

Polarization Characteristics of Zebra Patterns in Type IV Solar Radio Bursts

Polarization Characteristics of Zebra Patterns in Type IV Solar Radio Bursts Polarization Characteristics of Zebra Patterns in Type IV Solar Radio Bursts K. KANEDA 1*, H. MISAWA 1, K. IWAI 2, F. TSUCHIYA 1, T. OBARA 1, Y. KATOH 3, and S. MASUDA 4 1 Planetary Plasma and Atmospheric

More information

ASTRONOMY CURRICULUM Unit 1: Introduction to Astronomy

ASTRONOMY CURRICULUM Unit 1: Introduction to Astronomy Chariho Regional School District - Science Curriculum September, 2016 ASTRONOMY CURRICULUM Unit 1: Introduction to Astronomy OVERVIEW Summary Students will be introduced to the overarching concept of astronomy.

More information

Earth s Formation Unit [Astronomy] Student Success Sheets (SSS)

Earth s Formation Unit [Astronomy] Student Success Sheets (SSS) Page1 Earth s Formation Unit [Astronomy] Student Success Sheets (SSS) HS-ESSI-1; HS-ESS1-2; HS-ESS1-3; HS-ESSI-4 NGSS Civic Memorial High School - Earth Science A Concept # What we will be learning Mandatory

More information

Space Physics. An Introduction to Plasmas and Particles in the Heliosphere and Magnetospheres. May-Britt Kallenrode. Springer

Space Physics. An Introduction to Plasmas and Particles in the Heliosphere and Magnetospheres. May-Britt Kallenrode. Springer May-Britt Kallenrode Space Physics An Introduction to Plasmas and Particles in the Heliosphere and Magnetospheres With 170 Figures, 9 Tables, Numerous Exercises and Problems Springer Contents 1. Introduction

More information

Other Planetary Systems (Chapter 13) Extrasolar Planets. Is our solar system the only collection of planets in the universe?

Other Planetary Systems (Chapter 13) Extrasolar Planets. Is our solar system the only collection of planets in the universe? Other Planetary Systems (Chapter 13) Extrasolar Planets Is our solar system the only collection of planets in the universe? Based on Chapter 13 No subsequent chapters depend on the material in this lecture

More information

Greeks watched the stars move across the sky and noticed five stars that wandered around and did not follow the paths of the normal stars.

Greeks watched the stars move across the sky and noticed five stars that wandered around and did not follow the paths of the normal stars. Chapter 23 Our Solar System Our Solar System Historical Astronomy Wandering Stars Greeks watched the stars move across the sky and noticed five stars that wandered around and did not follow the paths of

More information

Extrasolar Planets = Exoplanets III.

Extrasolar Planets = Exoplanets III. Extrasolar Planets = Exoplanets III http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/~rdj/planets/images/taugruishydra2.jpg Outline Gravitational microlensing Direct detection Exoplanet atmospheres Detecting planets by microlensing:

More information

RADIO PULSATIONS IN THE m dm BAND: CASE STUDIES

RADIO PULSATIONS IN THE m dm BAND: CASE STUDIES RADIO PULSATIONS IN THE m dm BAND: CASE STUDIES M. Messerotti, P. Zlobec, A. Veronig, and A. Hanslmeier Abstract Radio pulsations are observed during several type IV bursts in the metric and decimetric

More information

DIN EN : (E)

DIN EN : (E) DIN EN 16603-10-04:2015-05 (E) Space engineering - Space environment; English version EN 16603-10-04:2015 Foreword... 12 Introduction... 13 1 Scope... 14 2 Normative references... 15 3 Terms, definitions

More information

In class quiz - nature of light. Moonbow with Sailboats (Matt BenDaniel)

In class quiz - nature of light. Moonbow with Sailboats (Matt BenDaniel) In class quiz - nature of light Moonbow with Sailboats (Matt BenDaniel) Nature of light - review Light travels at very high but finite speed. Light is electromagnetic wave characterized by wavelength (or

More information

Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life

Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life Review Introduction Main contents Quiz Unless otherwise noted, all pictures are taken from wikipedia.org Review 1 The presence of

More information

On the origin of microwave zebra pattern

On the origin of microwave zebra pattern A&A 431, 1037 1046 (2005) DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361:20048337 c ESO 2005 Astronomy & Astrophysics On the origin of microwave zebra pattern A. T. Altyntsev 1,A.A.Kuznetsov 1, N. S. Meshalkina 1, G. V. Rudenko

More information

UNIT 1: EARTH AND THE SOLAR SYSTEM.

UNIT 1: EARTH AND THE SOLAR SYSTEM. UNIT 1: EARTH AND THE SOLAR SYSTEM. 1) A BRIEF HISTORY Theories of the Universe In the second century BC, the astronomer Ptolemy proposed that the Earth was the centre of the Universe, and that the Sun,

More information

LEARNING ABOUT THE OUTER PLANETS. NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Io Above Jupiter s Clouds on New Year's Day, Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

LEARNING ABOUT THE OUTER PLANETS. NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Io Above Jupiter s Clouds on New Year's Day, Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona LEARNING ABOUT THE OUTER PLANETS Can see basic features through Earth-based telescopes. Hubble Space Telescope especially useful because of sharp imaging. Distances from Kepler s 3 rd law, diameters from

More information

What Channel Is That?

What Channel Is That? TOPIC 5 What Channel Is That? Light isn t the only kind of radiation coming from the stars. In the late nineteenth century, scientists found out that light is just one form of electromagnetic radiation.

More information

Lab 5: Searching for Extra-Solar Planets

Lab 5: Searching for Extra-Solar Planets Lab 5: Searching for Extra-Solar Planets Until 1996, astronomers only knew about planets orbiting our sun. Though other planetary systems were suspected to exist, none had been found. Now, thirteen years

More information

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Tarbuck Lutgens Chapter 24 Studying the Sun 24.1 The Study of Light Electromagnetic Radiation Electromagnetic radiation includes gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible

More information

A Comparative Analysis of Zebra-Pattern Structures at Frequencies from 20 to 7000 MHz

A Comparative Analysis of Zebra-Pattern Structures at Frequencies from 20 to 7000 MHz Astronomy Reports, Vol. 48, No. 10, 2004, pp. 853 870. Translated from Astronomicheskiĭ Zhurnal, Vol. 81, No. 10, 2004, pp. 938 955. Original Russian Text Copyright c 2004 by Chernov. A Comparative Analysis

More information

PHYS101 Sec 001 Hour Exam No. 2 Page: 1

PHYS101 Sec 001 Hour Exam No. 2 Page: 1 PHYS101 Sec 001 Hour Exam No. 2 Page: 1 1 The angle between the rotation axis of a planet and the perpendicular to the plane of its orbit is called its axial tilt. Which of these planets has an axial tilt

More information

Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8

Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8 To understand the formation of the solar system one has to apply concepts such as: Conservation of angular momentum Conservation of energy The theory of the formation

More information

Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION

Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION CHAPTER 4 The Solar System Lecture Presentation 4.0 What can be seen with the naked eye? Early astronomers knew about the Sun, Moon, stars, Mercury,

More information

The Universe. N.G. Schultheiss translated and adapted by K. Schadenberg

The Universe. N.G. Schultheiss translated and adapted by K. Schadenberg The Universe N.G. Schultheiss translated and adapted by K. Schadenberg 1 Introduction This module The Universe follows on the module The Sky and can give you some inspiration for the use of your own telescope

More information

Spin Radiation, remote MR Spectroscopy and MR Astronomy

Spin Radiation, remote MR Spectroscopy and MR Astronomy Spin Radiation, remote MR Spectroscopy and MR Astronomy Stanislav Sýkora www.ebyte.it/stan/talk_enc_2009.html Conjectures and suggestions of experiments Presented at the 50 th ENC, Asilomar, April 3, 2009

More information

Coronal Mass Ejections in the Heliosphere

Coronal Mass Ejections in the Heliosphere Coronal Mass Ejections in the Heliosphere N. Gopalswamy (NASA GSFC) http://cdaw.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications Plan General Properties Rate & Solar Cycle Variability Relation to Polarity Reversal CMEs and

More information

4. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets. 4.1 Expected properties of extrasolar planets. Sizes of gas giants, brown dwarfs & low-mass stars

4. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets. 4.1 Expected properties of extrasolar planets. Sizes of gas giants, brown dwarfs & low-mass stars 4. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets Reminder: Direct imaging is challenging: The proximity to its host star: 1 AU at 1 for alpha Cen 0.15 for the 10th most nearby solar-type star The low ratio of planet

More information

How did it come to be this way? Will I stop sounding like the

How did it come to be this way? Will I stop sounding like the Chapter 06 Let s Make a Solar System How did it come to be this way? Where did it come from? Will I stop sounding like the Talking Heads? What does the solar system look like? Big picture. The solar system

More information

Exam# 2 Review. Exam #2 is Wednesday November 8th at 10:40 AM in room FLG-280

Exam# 2 Review. Exam #2 is Wednesday November 8th at 10:40 AM in room FLG-280 Exam# 2 Review Exam #2 is Wednesday November 8th at 10:40 AM in room FLG-280 Bring Gator 1 ID card Bring pencil #2 with eraser No use of calculator or any electronic device during the exam We provide the

More information

Large Solar Flares. Albert Y. Shih NASA/GSFC 2014 Oct 21

Large Solar Flares. Albert Y. Shih NASA/GSFC 2014 Oct 21 Large Solar Flares Albert Y. Shih NASA/GSFC 2014 Oct 21 The Carrington event 1859 Sep 1: First observation of a flare Compared to other flares (Carrington 1859) (Cliver& Dietrich 2013) 2014 Oct 19, X1.1

More information

23.1 The Solar System. Orbits of the Planets. Planetary Data The Solar System. Scale of the Planets The Solar System

23.1 The Solar System. Orbits of the Planets. Planetary Data The Solar System. Scale of the Planets The Solar System 23.1 The Solar System Orbits of the Planets The Planets: An Overview The terrestrial planets are planets that are small and rocky Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. The Jovian planets are the huge gas giants

More information

Extrasolar Planets. Properties Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Extrasolar Planets. Properties Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley Extrasolar Planets Properties 2007 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley Finding extrasolar planets is hard quick recap Planet Detection Direct: pictures or spectra of the planets

More information

Topics and questions for astro presentations

Topics and questions for astro presentations Topics and questions for astro presentations 1. Historical development of distance measurements 1. Explain the challenges of identifying the distance to a point light source. What affects brightness? 2.

More information

Which letter on the timeline best represents the time when scientists estimate that the Big Bang occurred? A) A B) B C) C D) D

Which letter on the timeline best represents the time when scientists estimate that the Big Bang occurred? A) A B) B C) C D) D 1. The red shift of light from most galaxies is evidence that A) most galaxies are moving away from Earth B) a majority of stars in most galaxies are red giants C) the light slows down as it nears Earth

More information

Light and Telescopes

Light and Telescopes Light and Telescopes Astronomy 1 Elementary Astronomy LA Mission College Spring F2015 Quotes & Cartoon of the Day We find them smaller and fainter, in constantly increasing numbers, and we know that we

More information

Chapter 10 Worlds of Gas and Liquid- The Giant Planets. 21st CENTURY ASTRONOMY Fifth EDITION Kay Palen Blumenthal

Chapter 10 Worlds of Gas and Liquid- The Giant Planets. 21st CENTURY ASTRONOMY Fifth EDITION Kay Palen Blumenthal Chapter 10 Worlds of Gas and Liquid- The Giant Planets 21st CENTURY ASTRONOMY Fifth EDITION Kay Palen Blumenthal What is a storm on Saturn like? The Giant Planets, Part 1 Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

More information

The Transit Method: Results from the Ground

The Transit Method: Results from the Ground The Transit Method: Results from the Ground Results from individual transit search programs The Mass-Radius relationships (internal structure) Global Properties The Rossiter-McClaughlin Effect There are

More information

Radio Interferometry and VLBI. Aletha de Witt AVN Training 2016

Radio Interferometry and VLBI. Aletha de Witt AVN Training 2016 Radio Interferometry and VLBI Aletha de Witt AVN Training 2016 Radio Interferometry Single element radio telescopes have limited spatial resolution θ = 1.22 λ/d ~ λ/d Resolution of the GBT 100m telescope

More information

Temperature Reconstruction from SDO:AIA Filter Images

Temperature Reconstruction from SDO:AIA Filter Images Temperature Reconstruction from SDO:AIA Filter Images A report by Chris Gilbert Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder ASTR 5700; Stellar Astrophysics, Spring 2016 Abstract

More information

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE

Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Prentice Hall EARTH SCIENCE Tarbuck Lutgens 23.1 The Solar System The Planets: An Overview The terrestrial planets are planets that are small and rocky Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. The Jovian planets

More information

Uranus & Neptune: The Ice Giants. Discovery of Uranus. Bode s Law. Discovery of Neptune

Uranus & Neptune: The Ice Giants. Discovery of Uranus. Bode s Law. Discovery of Neptune Uranus & Neptune: The Ice Giants Discovery of Uranus Discovery of Uranus & Neptune Properties Density & Composition Internal Heat Source Magnetic fields Rings Uranus Rotational Axis by William Herschel

More information

Spectroscopy, the Doppler Shift and Masses of Binary Stars

Spectroscopy, the Doppler Shift and Masses of Binary Stars Doppler Shift At each point the emitter is at the center of a circular wavefront extending out from its present location. Spectroscopy, the Doppler Shift and Masses of Binary Stars http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

More information

CHAPTER 29: STARS BELL RINGER:

CHAPTER 29: STARS BELL RINGER: CHAPTER 29: STARS BELL RINGER: Where does the energy of the Sun come from? Compare the size of the Sun to the size of Earth. 1 CHAPTER 29.1: THE SUN What are the properties of the Sun? What are the layers

More information

Lecture 20: Planet formation II. Clues from Exoplanets

Lecture 20: Planet formation II. Clues from Exoplanets Lecture 20: Planet formation II. Clues from Exoplanets 1 Outline Definition of a planet Properties of exoplanets Formation models for exoplanets gravitational instability model core accretion scenario

More information

British Astronomical Association Radio Astronomy Group

British Astronomical Association Radio Astronomy Group Hello all, This is an informal note of some of the activities happening in the RAG world at the moment, well, at least the ones that I m aware of. I d like to produce something like this on a regular basis

More information

Comparative Planetology I: Our Solar System

Comparative Planetology I: Our Solar System Comparative Planetology I: Our Solar System Guiding Questions 1. Are all the other planets similar to Earth, or are they very different? 2. Do other planets have moons like Earth s Moon? 3. How do astronomers

More information

1UNIT. The Universe. What do you remember? Key language. Content objectives

1UNIT. The Universe. What do you remember? Key language. Content objectives 1UNIT The Universe What do you remember? What are the points of light in this photo? What is the difference between a star and a planet? a moon and a comet? Content objectives In this unit, you will Learn

More information

What is the Solar System?

What is the Solar System? What is the Solar System? Our Solar System is one of many planetary systems. It consists of: The Sun Eight planets with their natural satellites Five dwarf planets Billions of asteroids, comets and meteors

More information

Astronomy Ch. 6 The Solar System: Comparative Planetology

Astronomy Ch. 6 The Solar System: Comparative Planetology Name: Period: Date: Astronomy Ch. 6 The Solar System: Comparative Planetology MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) The largest asteroid,

More information

Tilts and Obliquities!

Tilts and Obliquities! Fran Bagenal! University of Colorado! Tilts and Obliquities! Offset Tilted Dipole Approximation Earth Stanley & Bloxham 2006 Jupiter Saturn B radial @ surface Uranus Neptune Magnetic Potential 3-D harmonics

More information

Extra-terrestrial Influences on Nature s Risks

Extra-terrestrial Influences on Nature s Risks Extra-terrestrial Influences on Nature s Risks Brent Walker Session Number: WBR9 Gravitational Influences Phase Locks & Harmonic Resonances After billions of years of evolution the solar system is still

More information

Chapter 15 The Formation of Planetary Systems

Chapter 15 The Formation of Planetary Systems Chapter 15 The Formation of Planetary Systems Units of Chapter 15 15.1 Modeling Planet Formation 15.2 Formation of the Solar System 15.3 Terrestrial and Jovian Planets 15.4 Interplanetary Debris 15.5 Solar

More information

Comparative Planetology I: Our Solar System. Chapter Seven

Comparative Planetology I: Our Solar System. Chapter Seven Comparative Planetology I: Our Solar System Chapter Seven ASTR 111 003 Fall 2006 Lecture 07 Oct. 16, 2006 Introduction To Modern Astronomy I Introducing Astronomy (chap. 1-6) Planets and Moons (chap. 7-17)

More information

Astronomy. physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am

Astronomy.  physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am Astronomy A. Dayle Hancock adhancock@wm.edu Small 239 Office hours: MTWR 10-11am Planetology II Key characteristics Chemical elements and planet size Radioactive dating Solar system formation Solar nebula

More information

Overview of the Solar System. Solar system contents one star, several planets, lots of debris.

Overview of the Solar System. Solar system contents one star, several planets, lots of debris. Overview of the Solar System Solar system contents one star, several planets, lots of debris. Most of it is the Sun! 99.8% of the mass of the Solar System resides in the Sun. A hot ball of mostly hydrogen

More information