Astronomy 1504 Section 10 Final Exam Version 1 May 6, 1999

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Astronomy 1504 Section 10 Final Exam Version 1 May 6, 1999"

Transcription

1 Astronomy 1504 Section 10 Final Exam Version 1 May 6, 1999 Reminder: When I write these questions, I believe that there is one one correct answer. The questions consist of all parts a e. Read the entire question before selecting an answer. Just because a statement is true does not mean it answers the question. Take your time! 1. The solar nebula probably began to collapse because: (a) it began to rotate (b) it was mostly hydrogen and helium (c) the sun s gravity pulled it in (d) it was compressed, most likely by a nearby exploding star 2. Which of the following are arranged in order of increasing mass? (a) Mercury, Venus, Mars, Uranus (b) Mercury, Mars, Earth, Neptune (c) Mars, Mercury, Earth, Neptune (d) Earth, Mars, Uranus, Jupiter 3. During the formation of the solar system, one process which caused grains to grow was: (a) the collision and sticking together of two grains (b) gravitational encounters with Jupiter (c) radiation pressure from the newly formed sun (d) the decay of radioactive isotopes 4. The rotation of the solar nebula caused it to: (a) collapse (b) flatten (c) glow (d) differentiate 1

2 5. Why does the earth not have a carbon dioxide atmosphere? (a) the earth outgassed little carbon dioxide (b) plant life has removed most of the carbon dioxide (c) the earth could not hold its carbon dioxide (d) the oceans removed much of the carbon dioxide, and plant life continues to remove it 6. The most abundant gas in the earth s present atmosphere is: (a) carbon dioxide (b) nitrogen (c) oxygen (d) water vapor 7. The age of the earth is approximately: (a) 6x10 3 years (b) 5x10 7 years (c) 5x10 9 years (d) infinite 8. The earth developed a nickel-iron core because: (a) it melted and differentiated (b) it is mostly made of nickel and iron (c) the magnetic field pulled the nickel and iron to the center (d) of the tidal forces exerted by the moon and sun together 9. Which of these is thought to be the correct theory for the origin of the moon? (a) formation elsewhere in the solar system & capture by the earth (b) forming simultaneously as the earth in the solar nebula (c) capture of a passing comet by the earth (d) creation by the giant impact of a mars sized body 10. Which planet rotates on its side? (a) Neptune (b) Pluto (c) Uranus (d) Venus 11. Which Jovian satellite is thought to contain liquid water? (a) Europa (b) Io (c) Ganymede (d) Calisto 2

3 12. Once the basic planet building process was complete, what happened to left-over planetesimals? (a) most of them fell into the sun (b) many were pushed out of the solar system by radiation pressure (c) many collided with the newly formed planets (d) they were hauled away to be used in another solar system 13. Meteorite ALH84001: (a) Was found in Antarctica (b) Came to the earth from mars (c) shows evidence that mars had liquid water (d) may indicate the presence of bacteria on mars (e) all of the above 14. Meteorites are easy to find in Antartica, because: (a) it is very cold there (b) they travel with ice and get trapped up against mountains (c) the ice acts like a magnet for meteorites (d) none of the above 15. Life as we know it is based on: (a) hydrogen (b) helium (c) carbon (d) oxygen (e) silicon 16. The probability of a technological civilization forming around a 10 solar mass star is small because (a) the star and any planets around it would be too hot (b) the star and any planets around it would be too cool (c) the stellar lifetime would be too brief (d) such stars will be binary and will not have planetary companions 17. Why would we not expect to find intelligent life on planets in the habitable zone around main sequence B stars? (a) these stars do not live long enough for intelligent life to develop (b) such planets would be much too hot for life (c) such stars have too little metals for solid planets to form (d) in fact, B stars are probably our best candidates 3

4 18. When we observe very distant galaxies we are observing: (a) very young objects (b) very old objects (c) objects having the approximate age of the Milky Way (d) distant galaxies; no statement may be made about age 19. After hydrogen, the next most abundant element formed in the big bang was: (a) helium (b) oxygen (c) nitrogen (d) carbon (e) iron 20. The cosmological critical density is: (a) the density of matter in the Milky Way (b) the density at which an object becomes a black hole (c) the number density of galaxies in a typical cluster of galaxies (d) the density at the center of the big bang (e) the density of a flat universe 21. The cosmological principle states that: (a) cosmology is the most noble human activity (b) the universe is homogeneous and isotropic, on a large scale (c) everything that goes up must come down (d) the universe must have a boundary, somewhere 22. The existence of the cosmic microwave background radiation : (a) is not taken seriously by most astronomers (b) is observational evidence in support of the big bang (c) is only detected from the southern hemisphere (d) is most intense at ultraviolet wavelengths 23. The microwave background (T 3 K) is presently ascribed to: (a) supernova explosion (b) smoothed out radiation of nearby objects (c) the process of the formation of the sun and planets (d) red-shifted photons from a very early stage of the universe 4

5 24. The fact that the known extra-solar planets have Jupiter sized masses, but short periods: (a) Means they are very nearby their stars (b) Is a challenge to the condensation hypothesis of solar nebula theory (c) Means they likely have changed their orbits and moved inward toward their stars since their birth (d) all of the above 25. A planet will move fastest in its orbit when it is: (a) farthest from the sun (b) at its average distance from the sun (c) nearest to the sun (d) at either of the foci of its orbit 26. The difference between 3 He and 4 He is: (a) a neutron (b) a proton (c) an electron (d) a neutrino (e) a positron 27. The heavy elements in our bodies were formed: (a) mostly in a black hole (b) mostly in neutron stars (c) mostly the interior of stars (d) mostly in the big bang 28. Which of the following galaxy types would we not expect to find stars forming in? (a) ellipticals (b) spirals (c) irregulars (d) starburst (e) active 29. The units that astronomers express Hubble s constant in is km/s/mpc. Really this is a funny way of writing: (a) time (b) distance (c) 1/time (d) redshift 5

6 30. In class, I ve said the value that the OU astronomers like for H 0 is: (a) 100 ± 20 (b) 50 ± 5 (c) 75 ± 10 (d) 60 ± We see a supernova in a galaxy that is 100 Mpc away. How long ago did the supernova actually occur? For the purpose of this question 1 ly = 3.3 pc. (a) 0 yr ago (b) 330 yr ago (c) 330,000 yr ago (d) 330,000,000 yr ago 32. The difference between a quasar and a Seyfert II galaxy is likely due to: (a) Different viewing angles (b) Quasar is an elliptical and Seyfert II is a spiral (c) Quasar has a smaller black hole than Seyfert II (d) Quasars are nearby and Seyfert II are far away 33. Why are the central engines in active galactic nuclei thought to be smaller than the solar system? (a) They contain black holes (b) They are very far away (c) They vary in brightness in only a few days or weeks (d) They appear to be point-like objects in the most powerful telescopes 34. Type Ia supernova showed us a surprising cosmological result in that: (a) We found the universe was expanding slower in the past than today (b) We found the universe was expanding faster in the past than today (c) They are thought to be explosions of a Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (d) all of the above 35. At the end of Big bang nucleosynthesis, the universe was mostly composed of: (a) protons, helium, photons, electrons, and neutrinos (b) electrons and positrons (c) quarks, gluons, photons, electrons, postirons, and neutrinos (d) carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen 6

7 36. The position of the life zone around a star depends on: (a) The effective temperature of the star (b) Where the planets are (c) How old the star is (d) none of the above 37. Olbers paradox asks the question: (a) Why is the universe curved? (b) Why is universe infinite? (c) Why is the night sky dark? (e) Why is the universe expanding? 38. The particles which produce meteor showers mostly come from: (a) impacts of asteroids with the moon (b) collisions of asteroids with each other (c) debri from comets (d) Jupiter 39. The objects which produce meteorites come from: (a) mostly asteroids, but sometimes comets (b) mostly comets, but sometimes asteroids (c) debri from comets (d) collisions of ring particles from Saturn 40. Long period comets come from and short period comets come from (a) Oort cloud and Kuiper Belt (b) Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud (c) Venus and Mars (d) none of the above Have a great summer! 7

Astronomy. physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am

Astronomy.  physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am Astronomy A. Dayle Hancock adhancock@wm.edu Small 239 Office hours: MTWR 10-11am Planetology II Key characteristics Chemical elements and planet size Radioactive dating Solar system formation Solar nebula

More information

Universe Celestial Object Galaxy Solar System

Universe Celestial Object Galaxy Solar System ASTRONOMY Universe- Includes all known matter (everything). Celestial Object Any object outside or above Earth s atmosphere. Galaxy- A large group (billions) of stars (held together by gravity). Our galaxy

More information

Chapter 8 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Formation of the Solar System

Chapter 8 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Formation of the Solar System Formation of the Solar System 8.1 The Search for Origins Our goals for learning: Develop a theory of solar system

More information

Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life

Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life Joy of Science Experience the evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life Review Introduction Main contents Quiz Unless otherwise noted, all pictures are taken from wikipedia.org Review 1 The presence of

More information

The Big Bang Theory (page 854)

The Big Bang Theory (page 854) Name Class Date Space Homework Packet Homework #1 Hubble s Law (pages 852 853) 1. How can astronomers use the Doppler effect? 2. The shift in the light of a galaxy toward the red wavelengths is called

More information

WHAT WE KNOW. Scientists observe that every object in the universe is moving away from each other. Objects furthest away are moving the fastest. So..

WHAT WE KNOW. Scientists observe that every object in the universe is moving away from each other. Objects furthest away are moving the fastest. So.. ASTRONOMY THE BIG BANG THEORY WHAT WE KNOW Scientists observe that every object in the universe is moving away from each other. Objects furthest away are moving the fastest. So.. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN? If

More information

Formation of the Universe & What is in Space? The Big Bang Theory and components of the Universe

Formation of the Universe & What is in Space? The Big Bang Theory and components of the Universe Formation of the Universe & What is in Space? The Big Bang Theory and components of the Universe The Big Bang Theory The Big Bang Theory The Big Bang Theory is the most widely accepted scientific explanation

More information

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION (The Universe) A. THE UNIVERSE: The universe encompasses all matter in existence. According to the Big Bang Theory, the universe was formed 10-20 billion years ago from a

More information

1. Cosmology is the study of. a. The sun is the center of the Universe. b. The Earth is the center of the Universe

1. Cosmology is the study of. a. The sun is the center of the Universe. b. The Earth is the center of the Universe Section 1: The Universe 1. Cosmology is the study of. 2. Identify the type of cosmology a. The sun is the center of the Universe b. The Earth is the center of the Universe 3. The two most abundant gases

More information

Our Solar System and Its Place in the Universe

Our Solar System and Its Place in the Universe Our Solar System and Its Place in the Universe The Formation of the Solar System Our Solar System includes: Planets Dwarf Planets Moons Small Solar System bodies Sun Outer portion created Planets and their

More information

21/11/ /11/2017 Space Physics AQA Physics topic 8

21/11/ /11/2017 Space Physics AQA Physics topic 8 Space Physics AQA Physics topic 8 8.1 Solar System, Orbits and Satellites The eight planets of our Solar System Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune As well as the eight planets, the

More information

-Melissa Greenberg, Arielle Hoffman, Zachary Feldmann, Ryan Pozin, Elizabeth Weeks, Christopher Pesota, & Sara Pilcher

-Melissa Greenberg, Arielle Hoffman, Zachary Feldmann, Ryan Pozin, Elizabeth Weeks, Christopher Pesota, & Sara Pilcher -Melissa Greenberg, Arielle Hoffman, Zachary Feldmann, Ryan Pozin, Elizabeth Weeks, Christopher Pesota, & Sara Pilcher Formation Overview All explanations as to how the solar system was formed are only

More information

Introduction to the Universe. What makes up the Universe?

Introduction to the Universe. What makes up the Universe? Introduction to the Universe What makes up the Universe? Objects in the Universe Astrophysics is the science that tries to make sense of the universe by - describing the Universe (Astronomy) - understanding

More information

The History of the Solar System. From cloud to Sun, planets, and smaller bodies

The History of the Solar System. From cloud to Sun, planets, and smaller bodies The History of the Solar System From cloud to Sun, planets, and smaller bodies The Birth of a Star Twenty years ago, we knew of only one star with planets the Sun and our understanding of the birth of

More information

The History of the Earth

The History of the Earth The History of the Earth We have talked about how the universe and sun formed, but what about the planets and moons? Review: Origin of the Universe The universe began about 13.7 billion years ago The Big

More information

Earth s Formation Unit [Astronomy] Student Success Sheets (SSS)

Earth s Formation Unit [Astronomy] Student Success Sheets (SSS) Page1 Earth s Formation Unit [Astronomy] Student Success Sheets (SSS) HS-ESSI-1; HS-ESS1-2; HS-ESS1-3; HS-ESSI-4 NGSS Civic Memorial High School - Earth Science A Concept # What we will be learning Mandatory

More information

Formation of the Universe

Formation of the Universe A. The Universe 1. 2. 3. How did the universe begin? Only one exists or are there more? Composed of space and 100 billion galaxies A galaxy is a grouping of millions or billions of stars kept together

More information

LESSON topic: formation of the solar system Solar system formation Star formation Models of the solar system Planets in our solar system

LESSON topic: formation of the solar system Solar system formation Star formation Models of the solar system Planets in our solar system Unit 2 Lesson 1 LESSON topic: formation of the solar system - Solar system formation - Star formation - Models of the solar system - Planets in our solar system Big bang theory Origin of the universe According

More information

Earth in the Universe Unit Notes

Earth in the Universe Unit Notes Earth in the Universe Unit Notes The Universe - everything everywhere, 15-20 billion years old Inside the universe there are billions of Galaxies Inside each Galaxy there are billions of Solar Systems

More information

Astronomy Unit Notes Name:

Astronomy Unit Notes Name: Astronomy Unit Notes Name: (DO NOT LOSE!) To help with the planets order 1 My = M 2 V = Venus 3 Eager = E 4 M = Mars 5 Just = J 6 Served = Saturn 7 Us = Uranus 8 N = N 1 Orbit: The path (usually elliptical)

More information

Astronomy Study Guide Answer Key

Astronomy Study Guide Answer Key Astronomy Study Guide Answer Key Section 1: The Universe 1. Cosmology is the study of how the universe is arranged. 2. Identify the type of cosmology a. The sun is the center of the Universe Heliocentric

More information

Coriolis Effect - the apparent curved paths of projectiles, winds, and ocean currents

Coriolis Effect - the apparent curved paths of projectiles, winds, and ocean currents Regents Earth Science Unit 5: Astronomy Models of the Universe Earliest models of the universe were based on the idea that the Sun, Moon, and planets all orbit the Earth models needed to explain how the

More information

The Universe and Galaxies

The Universe and Galaxies The Universe and Galaxies 16.1 http://dingo.care-mail.com/cards/flash/5409/galaxy.swf Universe The sum of all matter and energy that exists, that has ever existed, and that will ever exist. We will focus

More information

Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Base your answers to questions 1 and 2 on the passage below and on your knowledge of Earth Science. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation In the 1920s, Edwin Hubble's discovery of a pattern in the red

More information

What is it like? When did it form? How did it form. The Solar System. Fall, 2005 Astronomy 110 1

What is it like? When did it form? How did it form. The Solar System. Fall, 2005 Astronomy 110 1 What is it like? When did it form? How did it form The Solar System Fall, 2005 Astronomy 110 1 Fall, 2005 Astronomy 110 2 The planets all orbit the sun in the same direction. The Sun spins in the same

More information

Figure 19.19: HST photo called Hubble Deep Field.

Figure 19.19: HST photo called Hubble Deep Field. 19.3 Galaxies and the Universe Early civilizations thought that Earth was the center of the universe. In the sixteenth century, we became aware that Earth is a small planet orbiting a medium-sized star.

More information

Science Practice Astronomy (AstronomyJSuber)

Science Practice Astronomy (AstronomyJSuber) Name: Date: 1. The pull of gravity on Earth is a direct result of the A. mass of Earth. B. magnetic field of Earth. C. rotation of Earth on its axis. D. weight of Earth's atmosphere. This online assessment

More information

Astronomy Today. Eighth edition. Eric Chaisson Steve McMillan

Astronomy Today. Eighth edition. Eric Chaisson Steve McMillan Global edition Astronomy Today Eighth edition Eric Chaisson Steve McMillan The Distance Scale ~1 Gpc Velocity L Distance Hubble s law Supernovae ~200 Mpc Time Tully-Fisher ~25 Mpc ~10,000 pc Time Variable

More information

What is Earth Science?

What is Earth Science? What is Earth Science? A.EARTH SCIENCE: the study of Earth and its history B. Earth science is divided into 4 main branches: 1. Geology: study of the lithosphere 2. Oceanography: study of oceans 3. Meteorology:

More information

CST Prep- 8 th Grade Astronomy

CST Prep- 8 th Grade Astronomy CST Prep- 8 th Grade Astronomy Chapter 15 (Part 1) 1. The theory of how the universe was created is called the 2. Which equation states that matter and energy are interchangeable? 3. All matter in the

More information

Which of the following statements best describes the general pattern of composition among the four jovian

Which of the following statements best describes the general pattern of composition among the four jovian Part A Which of the following statements best describes the general pattern of composition among the four jovian planets? Hint A.1 Major categories of ingredients in planetary composition The following

More information

AST Section 2: Test 2

AST Section 2: Test 2 AST1002 - Section 2: Test 2 Date: 11/05/2009 Name: Equations: E = m c 2 Question 1: The Sun is a stable star because 1. gravity balances forces from pressure. (!) Miniquiz 7, Q3 2. the rate of fusion equals

More information

Lunar Eclipse. Solar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse. Solar Eclipse Lunar Eclipse SUN Moon Solar Eclipse SUN SUN Moon Total solar eclipse Partial solar eclipse Moon Phases What does the moon look like from at each position? G H F A E B D C SUNLIGHT Refracting Telescopes

More information

Homework 6 Name: Due Date: June 9, 2008

Homework 6 Name: Due Date: June 9, 2008 Homework 6 Name: Due Date: June 9, 2008 1. Where in the universe does the general expansion occur? A) everywhere in the universe, including our local space upon Earth, the solar system, our galaxy and

More information

According to the currents models of stellar life cycle, our sun will eventually become a. Chapter 34: Cosmology. Cosmology: How the Universe Works

According to the currents models of stellar life cycle, our sun will eventually become a. Chapter 34: Cosmology. Cosmology: How the Universe Works Chapter 34: Cosmology According to the currents models of stellar life cycle, our sun will eventually become a a) Cloud of hydrogen gas b) Protostar c) Neutron star d) Black hole e) White dwarf id you

More information

Astronomy 103: First Exam

Astronomy 103: First Exam Name: Astronomy 103: First Exam Stephen Lepp October 27, 2010 Each question is worth 2 points. Write your name on this exam and on the scantron. 1 Short Answer A. What is the largest of the terrestrial

More information

ASTR 380. The Universe: the context for Life

ASTR 380. The Universe: the context for Life ASTR 380 The Universe: the context for Life Simple facts: The Universe is vast. The Universe is old. The elements for life are wide-spread. Our physical laws appear universal The Universe is mostly empty!

More information

CHAPTER 11. We continue to Learn a lot about the Solar System by using Space Exploration

CHAPTER 11. We continue to Learn a lot about the Solar System by using Space Exploration CHAPTER 11 We continue to Learn a lot about the Solar System by using Space Exploration Section 11.1 The Sun page 390 -Average sized star -Millions of km away -300,000 more massive then Earth, 99% of all

More information

NSCI 314 LIFE IN THE COSMOS

NSCI 314 LIFE IN THE COSMOS NSCI 314 LIFE IN THE COSMOS 2 BASIC ASTRONOMY, AND STARS AND THEIR EVOLUTION Dr. Karen Kolehmainen Department of Physics CSUSB COURSE WEBPAGE: http://physics.csusb.edu/~karen MOTIONS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM

More information

OUR SOLAR SYSTEM. James Martin. Facebook.com/groups/AstroLSSC Twitter.com/AstroLSSC

OUR SOLAR SYSTEM. James Martin. Facebook.com/groups/AstroLSSC Twitter.com/AstroLSSC OUR SOLAR SYSTEM James Martin Facebook.com/groups/AstroLSSC Twitter.com/AstroLSSC It s time for the human race to enter the solar system. -Dan Quayle Structure of the Solar System Our Solar System contains

More information

outline 1. in the beginning. The Big Bang 2. galaxies -- different types 3. stars -- life cycle 4. the solar system -- sun and planets

outline 1. in the beginning. The Big Bang 2. galaxies -- different types 3. stars -- life cycle 4. the solar system -- sun and planets Earth s Place in the Universe outline 1. in the beginning. The Big Bang 2. galaxies -- different types 3. stars -- life cycle 4. the solar system -- sun and planets the big bang the universe is expanding

More information

Astronomy 1504/1514 Section 10 FINAL EXAM, Version 1 December 17, 2002

Astronomy 1504/1514 Section 10 FINAL EXAM, Version 1 December 17, 2002 Astronomy 1504/1514 Section 10 FINAL EXAM, Version 1 December 17, 2002 Choose the answer that best completes the question. Read each problem carefully and read through all the answers. Take your time.

More information

Chapter 17 Solar System

Chapter 17 Solar System Chapter 17 Solar System Rotation Earth spinning on its axis (like a top) "TOP" imaginary rod running through the center of the Earth from North pole to South pole The Earth is tilted on its axis at an

More information

ASTRONOMY 1 FINAL EXAM 1 Name

ASTRONOMY 1 FINAL EXAM 1 Name ASTRONOMY 1 FINAL EXAM 1 Name Multiple Choice (2 pts each) 1. Sullivan Star is an F spectral class star that is part of a binary star system. It has a MS lifetime of 5 billion years. Its life will eventually

More information

The Solar System 6/23

The Solar System 6/23 6/23 The Solar System I. Earth A. Earth is the prototype terrestrial planet 1. Only planet in the solar system (we know of so far) with life 2. Temperature 290 K B. Physical Characteristics 1. Mass: 6

More information

At this point of its orbit, any solar satellite such as a comet or a planet is farthest away from the sun. What is the aphelion?

At this point of its orbit, any solar satellite such as a comet or a planet is farthest away from the sun. What is the aphelion? At this point of its orbit, any solar satellite such as a comet or a planet is farthest away from the sun. What is the aphelion? These small, rocky worlds orbit the sun generally between the orbits of

More information

Exam 3 Astronomy 100, Section 3. Some Equations You Might Need

Exam 3 Astronomy 100, Section 3. Some Equations You Might Need Exam 3 Astronomy 100, Section 3 Some Equations You Might Need modified Kepler s law: M = [a(au)]3 [p(yr)] (a is radius of the orbit, p is the rotation period. You 2 should also remember that the period

More information

Big Galaxies Are Rare! Cepheid Distance Measurement. Clusters of Galaxies. The Nature of Galaxies

Big Galaxies Are Rare! Cepheid Distance Measurement. Clusters of Galaxies. The Nature of Galaxies Big Galaxies Are Rare! Potato Chip Rule: More small things than large things Big, bright spirals are easy to see, but least common Dwarf ellipticals & irregulars are most common Faint, hard to see Mostly

More information

Introduction to the Universe

Introduction to the Universe What makes up the Universe? Introduction to the Universe Book page 642-644 Objects in the Universe Astrophysics is the science that tries to make sense of the universe by - describing the Universe (Astronomy)

More information

ASTRONOMY. Eric Chaisson. Steve McMillan. A Beginner's Guide to the Universe FOURTH EDITION. Tufts University. Drexel University

ASTRONOMY. Eric Chaisson. Steve McMillan. A Beginner's Guide to the Universe FOURTH EDITION. Tufts University. Drexel University ASTRONOMY A Beginner's Guide to the Universe FOURTH EDITION Eric Chaisson Tufts University Steve McMillan Drexel University PEARSON Prentice Hall Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey

More information

Cosmology Vocabulary

Cosmology Vocabulary Cosmology Vocabulary Vocabulary Words Terrestrial Planets The Sun Gravity Galaxy Lightyear Axis Comets Kuiper Belt Oort Cloud Meteors AU Nebula Solar System Cosmology Universe Coalescence Jovian Planets

More information

Measuring Distances to Galaxies. Galaxies in Motion. Hubble s Law. Galaxy Redshifts. Type Ia Supernovae. Supernovae are Good Standard Candles

Measuring Distances to Galaxies. Galaxies in Motion. Hubble s Law. Galaxy Redshifts. Type Ia Supernovae. Supernovae are Good Standard Candles Measuring Distances to Galaxies Too far for parallax! Standard Candles: Cepheid Variables (for Local Group) Type Ia Supernovae Redshifts Type Ia Supernovae These are another standard candle used to measure

More information

The Coriolis effect. Why does the cloud spin? The Solar Nebula. Origin of the Solar System. Gravitational Collapse

The Coriolis effect. Why does the cloud spin? The Solar Nebula. Origin of the Solar System. Gravitational Collapse Origin of the Solar System Our theory must explain the data 1. Large bodies in the Solar System have orderly motions. 2. There are two types of planets. small, rocky terrestrial planets large, hydrogen-rich

More information

HW #2. Solar Nebular Theory. Predictions: Young stars have disks. Disks contain gas & dust. Solar System should contain disk remnants

HW #2. Solar Nebular Theory. Predictions: Young stars have disks. Disks contain gas & dust. Solar System should contain disk remnants Astronomy 330: Extraterrestrial Life This class (Lecture 9): Next Class: Planet Formation Zachary Brewer Quinn Calvert Exoplanets Itamar Allali Brian Campbell-Deem HW #3 due Sunday night. Music: Another

More information

Origin of the Solar System

Origin of the Solar System Origin of the Solar System and Solar System Debris 1 Debris comets meteoroids asteroids gas dust 2 Asteroids irregular, rocky hunks small in mass and size Ceres - largest, 1000 km in diameter (1/3 Moon)

More information

The Solar Nebula Theory. This lecture will help you understand: Conceptual Integrated Science. Chapter 28 THE SOLAR SYSTEM

The Solar Nebula Theory. This lecture will help you understand: Conceptual Integrated Science. Chapter 28 THE SOLAR SYSTEM This lecture will help you understand: Hewitt/Lyons/Suchocki/Yeh Conceptual Integrated Science Chapter 28 THE SOLAR SYSTEM Overview of the Solar System The Nebular Theory The Sun Asteroids, Comets, and

More information

Answers. The Universe. Year 10 Science Chapter 6

Answers. The Universe. Year 10 Science Chapter 6 Answers The Universe Year 10 Science Chapter 6 p133 1 The universe is considered to be the whole of all matter, energy, planets, solar systems, galaxies, and space. Many definitions of the universe also

More information

Exam 3 Astronomy 114

Exam 3 Astronomy 114 Exam 3 Astronomy 114 Select the answer that is the most appropriate among the choices given. 1. What is the Hubble law? (A) a relation between a galaxy s mass and radius. (B) a rule that describes the

More information

Today. Solar System Formation. a few more bits and pieces. Homework due

Today. Solar System Formation. a few more bits and pieces. Homework due Today Solar System Formation a few more bits and pieces Homework due Pluto Charon 3000 km Asteroids small irregular rocky bodies Comets icy bodies Formation of the Solar System How did these things come

More information

Physics HW Set 3 Spring 2015

Physics HW Set 3 Spring 2015 1) If the Sun were replaced by a one solar mass black hole 1) A) life here would be unchanged. B) we would still orbit it in a period of one year. C) all terrestrial planets would fall in immediately.

More information

Earth Science 11 Learning Guide Unit Complete the following table with information about the sun:

Earth Science 11 Learning Guide Unit Complete the following table with information about the sun: Earth Science 11 Learning Guide Unit 2 Name: 2-1 The sun 1. Complete the following table with information about the sun: a. Mass compare to the Earth: b. Temperature of the gases: c. The light and heat

More information

Section 25.1 Exploring the Solar System (pages )

Section 25.1 Exploring the Solar System (pages ) Name Class Date Chapter 25 The Solar System Section 25.1 Exploring the Solar System (pages 790 794) This section explores early models of our solar system. It describes the components of the solar system

More information

Chapter 15: The Origin of the Solar System

Chapter 15: The Origin of the Solar System Chapter 15: The Origin of the Solar System The Solar Nebula Hypothesis Basis of modern theory of planet formation: Planets form at the same time from the same cloud as the star. Planet formation sites

More information

Astronomy 113. Dr. Joseph E. Pesce, Ph.D. Review. Semester Recap. Nature of Light. Wavelength. Red/Blue Light 4/30/18

Astronomy 113. Dr. Joseph E. Pesce, Ph.D. Review. Semester Recap. Nature of Light. Wavelength. Red/Blue Light 4/30/18 https://www.theverge.com/2018/ 3/10/17104188/melodysheeptime-lapse-universe-earthformation-watch Astronomy 113 Dr. Joseph E. Pesce, Ph.D. Review Semester Recap ³Light and Radiation ³The Sun ³Measuring

More information

The Solar System. Tour of the Solar System

The Solar System. Tour of the Solar System The Solar System Tour of the Solar System The Sun more later 8 planets Mercury Venus Earth more later Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Various other objects Asteroids Comets Pluto The Terrestrial Planets

More information

Galaxies: enormous collections of gases, dust and stars held together by gravity Our galaxy is called the milky way

Galaxies: enormous collections of gases, dust and stars held together by gravity Our galaxy is called the milky way Celestial bodies are all of the natural objects in space ex. stars moons, planets, comets etc. Star: celestial body of hot gas that gives off light and heat the closest star to earth is the sun Planet:

More information

Lecture PowerPoints. Chapter 33 Physics: Principles with Applications, 7 th edition Giancoli

Lecture PowerPoints. Chapter 33 Physics: Principles with Applications, 7 th edition Giancoli Lecture PowerPoints Chapter 33 Physics: Principles with Applications, 7 th edition Giancoli This work is protected by United States copyright laws and is provided solely for the use of instructors in teaching

More information

a. 1/3 AU b. 3 AU 5. Meteor showers occur

a. 1/3 AU b. 3 AU 5. Meteor showers occur 1 AST104 Sp. 2006: WELCOME TO EXAM 3 Multiple Choice Questions: Mark the best answer choice on the answer form. Read all answer choices before making selection. CHECK YOUR WORK CAREFULLY BEFORE HANDING

More information

Unit 12 Lesson 1 What Objects Are Part of the Solar System?

Unit 12 Lesson 1 What Objects Are Part of the Solar System? Unit 12 Lesson 1 What Objects Are Part of the Solar System? The Solar System Earth, other planets, and the moon are part of a solar system. A solar system is made up of a star and the planets and other

More information

1 A Solar System Is Born

1 A Solar System Is Born CHAPTER 16 1 A Solar System Is Born SECTION Our Solar System California Science Standards 8.2.g, 8.4.b, 8.4.c, 8.4.d BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions:

More information

Exploring Our Solar System

Exploring Our Solar System Exploring Our Solar System Our Solar System What do you think? Read the two statements below and decide whether you agree or disagree with them. Place an A in the Before column if you agree with the statement

More information

Exploring Our Solar System

Exploring Our Solar System CHAPTER 21 Exploring Our Solar System LESSON 1 Our Solar System What do you think? Read the two statements below and decide whether you agree or disagree with them. Place an A in the Before column if you

More information

Cosmology. What is Cosmology?

Cosmology. What is Cosmology? Cosmology What is Cosmology? The study of the structure and evolution of the entire universe The idea is to form picture of the entire Universe: origin, size, and future We will make assumptions that what

More information

Formation of the Solar System. What We Know. What We Know

Formation of the Solar System. What We Know. What We Know Formation of the Solar System Many of the characteristics of the planets we discussed last week are a direct result of how the Solar System formed Until recently, theories for solar system formation were

More information

9/22/ A Brief Tour of the Solar System. Chapter 6: Formation of the Solar System. What does the solar system look like?

9/22/ A Brief Tour of the Solar System. Chapter 6: Formation of the Solar System. What does the solar system look like? 9/22/17 Lecture Outline 6.1 A Brief Tour of the Solar System Chapter 6: Formation of the Solar System What does the solar system look like? Our goals for learning: What does the solar system look like?

More information

http://eps.mcgill.ca/~courses/c201_winter/ http://eps.mcgill.ca/~courses/c201_winter/ Neutron Proton Nucleosynthesis neutron!! electron!+!proton!!=!!é!!+!h +!! t 1/2 =!12!minutes H + +!neutron!! Deuterium!(D)

More information

Our Universe: Creation, Galaxies, Stars and Celestial Objects

Our Universe: Creation, Galaxies, Stars and Celestial Objects Our Universe: Creation, Galaxies, Stars and Celestial Objects Big Bang Theory Our universe began with one huge exploding atom that relapsed all the energy and matter that exists in the universe today.

More information

Chapter 11 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Jovian Planet Systems Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 11 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Jovian Planet Systems Pearson Education, Inc. Review Clickers The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Jovian Planet Systems If Jupiter was the size of a basketball, Earth would be the size of a(n) a) bacterium. b) grain of rice. c) marble. d) orange.

More information

Unit 1: The Earth in the Universe

Unit 1: The Earth in the Universe Unit 1: The Earth in the Universe 1. The Universe 1.1. First ideas about the Universe 1.2. Components and origin 1.3. Sizes and distances 2. The Solar System 3. The planet Earth 3.1. Movements of the Earth

More information

Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8

Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System Chapter 8 To understand the formation of the solar system one has to apply concepts such as: Conservation of angular momentum Conservation of energy The theory of the formation

More information

Radiation - a process in which energy travels through vacuum (without a medium) Conduction a process in which energy travels through a medium

Radiation - a process in which energy travels through vacuum (without a medium) Conduction a process in which energy travels through a medium SOLAR SYSTEM NOTES ENERGY TRANSFERS Radiation - a process in which energy travels through vacuum (without a medium) Conduction a process in which energy travels through a medium Convection - The transfer

More information

1 of 5 5/2/2015 5:50 PM

1 of 5 5/2/2015 5:50 PM 1 of 5 5/2/2015 5:50 PM 1. A comet that has a semi-major axis of 100 AU must have a period of about 10 years. 20 years. 100 years. 1000 years. 2. Astronomers believe chondrite meteorites are about 4.6

More information

HNRS 227 Fall 2006 Chapter 13. What is Pluto? What is a Planet? There are two broad categories of planets: Terrestrial and Jovian

HNRS 227 Fall 2006 Chapter 13. What is Pluto? What is a Planet? There are two broad categories of planets: Terrestrial and Jovian Key Points of Chapter 13 HNRS 227 Fall 2006 Chapter 13 The Solar System presented by Prof. Geller 24 October 2006 Planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune Dwarf Planets Pluto,

More information

3. The name of a particularly large member of the asteroid belt is A) Halley B) Charon C) Eris D) Ceres E) Triton

3. The name of a particularly large member of the asteroid belt is A) Halley B) Charon C) Eris D) Ceres E) Triton Summer 2013 Astronomy - Test 2 Test form A Name Do not forget to write your name and fill in the bubbles with your student number, and fill in test form A on the answer sheet. Write your name above as

More information

29:50 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe Final Exam December 13, 2010 Form A

29:50 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe Final Exam December 13, 2010 Form A 29:50 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe Final Exam December 13, 2010 Form A There are 40 questions. Read each question and all of the choices before choosing. Budget your time. No whining. Walk with Ursus!

More information

Astr 170B1 Sec 3 SOLUTIONS April 11, 2016

Astr 170B1 Sec 3 SOLUTIONS April 11, 2016 Correct responses in BOLDFACE. Brightness 1. Look at the graph at the left. What is the period for this star? a. 9 days b. 1 day c. 5.5 days d. 4.5 days e. need more information 2. Comets are comprised

More information

Number of Stars: 100 billion (10 11 ) Mass : 5 x Solar masses. Size of Disk: 100,000 Light Years (30 kpc)

Number of Stars: 100 billion (10 11 ) Mass : 5 x Solar masses. Size of Disk: 100,000 Light Years (30 kpc) THE MILKY WAY GALAXY Type: Spiral galaxy composed of a highly flattened disk and a central elliptical bulge. The disk is about 100,000 light years (30kpc) in diameter. The term spiral arises from the external

More information

About the Midterm. Same rules. About the same length/structure Objects in the Solar System through Stars & Galaxy Classification. Use your index card!

About the Midterm. Same rules. About the same length/structure Objects in the Solar System through Stars & Galaxy Classification. Use your index card! ABOUT THE MIDTERM About the Midterm Same rules Use your index card! About the same length/structure Objects in the Solar System through Stars & Galaxy Classification roughly 33% Solar System topics & 67%

More information

Astr 170B1 Sec 3 SOLUTIONS April 11, 2016

Astr 170B1 Sec 3 SOLUTIONS April 11, 2016 Correct responses in BOLDFACE. 1. Galaxy collisions can a. trigger high rates of star formation b. perturb the planets orbiting stars in the colliding galaxies c. drag most of the interstellar gas out

More information

Astr 170B1 Sec 3 SOLUTIONS April 11, 2016

Astr 170B1 Sec 3 SOLUTIONS April 11, 2016 Correct responses in BOLDFACE. 1. The metallic hydrogen in Jupiter's interior contributes to a. its rapid rotation b. its extreme temperature c. its extreme weather patterns d. its strong magnetic field

More information

Astronomy 241: Foundations of Astrophysics I. The Solar System

Astronomy 241: Foundations of Astrophysics I. The Solar System Astronomy 241: Foundations of Astrophysics I. The Solar System Astronomy 241 is the first part of a year-long introduction to astrophysics. It uses basic classical mechanics and thermodynamics to analyze

More information

ASTR 1050: Survey of Astronomy Fall 2012 PRACTICE Exam #2 Instructor: Michael Brotherton Covers Solar System and Exoplanet Topics

ASTR 1050: Survey of Astronomy Fall 2012 PRACTICE Exam #2 Instructor: Michael Brotherton Covers Solar System and Exoplanet Topics ASTR 1050: Survey of Astronomy Fall 2012 PRACTICE Exam #2 Instructor: Michael Brotherton Covers Solar System and Exoplanet Topics Instructions This exam is closed book and closed notes, although you may

More information

UNIT 1: THE UNIVERSE VOCABULARY

UNIT 1: THE UNIVERSE VOCABULARY UNIT 1: THE UNIVERSE VOCABULARY Asteroids Asteroid belt Astronomical unit (AU) Black hole Celestial body Cluster of galaxies Comets Constellation Dwarf planets Galaxy Light-year (LY) meteorites Milky Way

More information

3. The moon with the most substantial atmosphere in the Solar System is A) Iapetus B) Io C) Titan D) Triton E) Europa

3. The moon with the most substantial atmosphere in the Solar System is A) Iapetus B) Io C) Titan D) Triton E) Europa Spring 2013 Astronomy - Test 2 Test form A Name Do not forget to write your name and fill in the bubbles with your student number, and fill in test form A on the answer sheet. Write your name above as

More information

1star 1 star 9 8 planets 63 (major) moons asteroids, comets, meteoroids

1star 1 star 9 8 planets 63 (major) moons asteroids, comets, meteoroids The Solar System 1star 1 star 9 8 planets 63 (major) moons asteroids, comets, meteoroids The distances to planets are known from Kepler s Laws (once calibrated with radar ranging to Venus) How are planet

More information

Astronomy 102: Stars and Galaxies Examination 3 April 11, 2003

Astronomy 102: Stars and Galaxies Examination 3 April 11, 2003 Name: Seat Number: Astronomy 102: Stars and Galaxies Examination 3 April 11, 2003 Do not open the test until instructed to begin. Instructions: Write your answers in the space provided. If you need additional

More information

A star is a massive sphere of gases with a core like a thermonuclear reactor. They are the most common celestial bodies in the universe are stars.

A star is a massive sphere of gases with a core like a thermonuclear reactor. They are the most common celestial bodies in the universe are stars. A star is a massive sphere of gases with a core like a thermonuclear reactor. They are the most common celestial bodies in the universe are stars. They radiate energy (electromagnetic radiation) from a

More information

Describe the lifecycle of a star in chronological order and explain the main stages, relating the stellar evolution to initial mass

Describe the lifecycle of a star in chronological order and explain the main stages, relating the stellar evolution to initial mass Learning Objectives At the end of this unit you should be able to; Explain the major events in the evolution of the universe according to the Big Bang Theory, in chronological order, backing up your arguments

More information

Supernovae, Neutron Stars, Pulsars, and Black Holes

Supernovae, Neutron Stars, Pulsars, and Black Holes Supernovae, Neutron Stars, Pulsars, and Black Holes Massive stars and Type II supernovae Massive stars (greater than 8 solar masses) can create core temperatures high enough to burn carbon and heavier

More information

Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION

Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION CHAPTER 4 The Solar System Lecture Presentation 4.0 What can be seen with the naked eye? Early astronomers knew about the Sun, Moon, stars, Mercury,

More information