Physics 207 Lecture 20. Chapter 15, Fluids

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Physics 207 Lecture 20. Chapter 15, Fluids"

Transcription

1 Chapter 15, Fluids This is an actual photo of an iceberg, taken by a rig manager for Global Marine Drilling in St. Johns, Newfoundland. The water was calm and the sun was almost directly overhead so that the diver Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 1 Physics 207, Lecture 20, Nov. 10 Goals: Chapter 15 Understand pressure in liquids and gases Use Archimedes principle to understand buoyancy Understand the equation of continuity Use an ideal-fluid model to study fluid flow. Investigate the elastic deformation of solids and liquids Assignment HW9, Due Wednesday, Nov. 19 th Wednesday: Read all of Chapter 16 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 2 Page 1

2 Fluids (Ch. 15) At ordinary temperature, matter exists in one of three states Solid - has a shape and forms a surface Liquid - has no shape but forms a surface Gas - has no shape and forms no surface What do we mean by fluids? Fluids are substances that flow. substances that take the shape of the container Atoms and molecules are free to move. No long range correlation between positions. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 3 Fluids An intrinsic parameter of a fluid Density ρ = m V units : kg/m 3 = 10-3 g/cm 3 ρ(water) = x 10 3 kg/m 3 = g/cm 3 ρ(ice) = x 10 3 kg/m 3 = g/cm 3 ρ(air) = 1.29 kg/m 3 = 1.29 x 10-3 g/cm 3 ρ(hg) = 13.6 x10 3 kg/m 3 = 13.6 g/cm 3 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 4 Page 2

3 Fluids Another parameter: Pressure p = F A Any force exerted by a fluid is perpendicular to a surface of contact, and is proportional to the area of that surface. Force (a vector) in a fluid can be expressed in terms of pressure (a scalar) as: r F = panˆ n A Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 5 What is the SI unit of pressure? A. Pascal B. Atmosphere C. Bernoulli D. Young E. p.s.i. Units : 1 N/m 2 = 1 Pa (Pascal) 1 bar = 10 5 Pa 1 mbar = 10 2 Pa 1 torr = Pa 1 atm = x10 5 Pa = 1013 mbar = 760 Torr = 14.7 lb/ in 2 (=PSI) Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 6 Page 3

4 Pressure vs. Depth Incompressible Fluids (liquids) When the pressure is much less than the bulk modulus of the fluid, we treat the density as constant independent of pressure: incompressible fluid For an incompressible fluid, the density is the same everywhere, but the pressure is NOT! p(y) = p 0 - y g ρ = p 0 + d g ρ Gauge pressure (subtract p 0, usually 1 atm) p 1 y 1 y 2 mg p 0 F 1 A F 2 p 2 F 2 = F 1 + m g = F 1 + ρvg F 2 /A = F 1 /A + ρvg/a p 2 = p 1 - ρg y Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 7 Pressure vs. Depth For a uniform fluid in an open container pressure same at a given depth independent of the container y p(y) Fluid level is the same everywhere in a connected container, assuming no surface forces Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 8 Page 4

5 Pressure Measurements: Barometer Invented by Torricelli A long closed tube is filled with mercury and inverted in a dish of mercury The closed end is nearly a vacuum Measures atmospheric pressure as One 1 atm = m (of Hg) Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 9 Exercise Pressure What happens with two fluids?? Consider a U tube containing liquids of density ρ 1 and ρ 2 as shown: ρ 2 d I ρ 1 Compare the densities of the liquids: (A) ρ 1 < ρ 2 (B) ρ 1 = ρ 2 (C) ρ 1 > ρ 2 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 10 Page 5

6 Exercise Pressure What happens with two fluids?? Consider a U tube containing liquids of density ρ 1 and ρ 2 as shown: ρ 2 d I At the red arrow the pressure must be the same on either side. ρ 1 x = ρ 2 (d 1 + y) Compare the densities of the liquids: ρ 1 y (A) ρ 1 < ρ 2 (B) ρ 1 = ρ 2 (C) ρ 1 > ρ 2 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 11 Archimedes Principle Suppose we weigh an object in air (1) and in water (2). W 1 W 2? How do these weights compare? W 1 < W 2 W 1 = W 2 W 1 > W 2 Buoyant force is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 12 Page 6

7 The Golden Crown In the first century BC the Roman architect Vitruvius related a story of how Archimedes uncovered a fraud in the manufacture of a golden crown commissioned by Hiero II, the king of Syracuse. The crown (corona in Vitruvius s Latin) would have been in the form of a wreath, such as one of the three pictured from grave sites in Macedonia and the Dardanelles. Hiero would have placed such a wreath on the statue of a god or goddess. Suspecting that the goldsmith might have replaced some of the gold given to him by an equal weight of silver, Hiero asked Archimedes to determine whether the wreath was pure gold. And because the wreath was a holy object dedicated to the gods, he could not disturb the wreath in any way. (In modern terms, he was to perform nondestructive testing). Archimedes solution to the problem, as described by Vitruvius, is neatly summarized in the following excerpt from an advertisement: The solution which occurred when he stepped into his bath and caused it to overflow was to put a weight of gold equal to the crown, and known to be pure, into a bowl which was filled with water to the brim. Then the gold would be removed and the king s crown put in, in its place. An alloy of lighter silver would increase the bulk of the crown and cause the bowl to overflow. From Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 13 Archimedes Principle Suppose we weigh an object in air (1) and in water (2). How do these weights compare? W 1 < W 2 W 1 = W 2 W 1 > W 2 Why? Since the pressure at the bottom of the object is greater than that at the top of the object, the water exerts a net upward force, the buoyant force, on the object. W 1 W 2? Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 14 Page 7

8 Sink or Float? The buoyant force is equal to the weight of the liquid that is displaced. If the buoyant force is larger than the weight of the object, it will float; otherwise it will sink. FB mg y We can calculate how much of a floating object will be submerged in the liquid: Object is in equilibrium F B = mg ρ liquid g V liquid = ρ object g V object V V liquid object = ρ ρ object liquid Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 15 Bar Trick What happens to the water level when the ice melts? piece of rock on top of ice A. It rises B. It stays the same C. It drops Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 16 Page 8

9 Exercise V 1 = V 2 = V 3 = V 4 = V 5 m 1 < m 2 < m 3 < m 4 < m 5 What is the final position of each block? Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 17 Exercise V 1 = V 2 = V 3 = V 4 = V 5 m 1 < m 2 < m 3 < m 4 < m 5 What is the final position of each block? Not this But this Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 18 Page 9

10 Exercise Buoyancy A small lead weight is fastened to a large styrofoam block and the combination floats on water with the water level with the top of the styrofoam block as shown. Pb styrofoam If you turn the styrofoam + Pb upside-down, What happens? (A) It sinks (B) styrofoam Pb (C) styrofoam Pb (D) styrofoam Pb Active Figure Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 19 Exercise Buoyancy A small lead weight is fastened to a large styrofoam block and the combination floats on water with the water level with the top of the styrofoam block as shown. Pb styrofoam If you turn the styrofoam + Pb upside-down, What happens (assuming density of Pb > water)? (A) It sinks (B) styrofoam Pb (C) styrofoam Pb (D) styrofoam Pb Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 20 Page 10

11 Exercise More Buoyancy Two identical cups are filled to the same level with water. One of the two cups has plastic balls floating in it. Cup I Which cup weighs more? Cup II (A) Cup I (B) Cup II (C) the same (D) can t tell Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 21 Exercise More Buoyancy Two identical cups are filled to the same level with water. One of the two cups has plastic balls floating in it. Cup I Which cup weighs more? Cup II (A) Cup I (B) Cup II (C) the same (D) can t tell Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 22 Page 11

12 Exercise Even More Buoyancy A plastic ball floats in a cup of water with half of its volume submerged. Next some oil (ρ oil < ρ ball < ρ water ) is slowly added to the container until it just covers the ball. Relative to the water level, the ball will: Hint 1: What is the buoyant force of the part in the oil as compared to the air? water oil (A) move up (B) move down (C) stay in same place Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 23 Exercise Even More Buoyancy A plastic ball floats in a cup of water with half of its volume submerged. Next some oil (ρ oil < ρ ball < ρ water ) is slowly added to the container until it just covers the ball. Relative to the water level, the ball will: Hint 1: What is the buoyant force of the part in the oil as compared to the air? water oil (A) move up (B) move down (C) stay in same place Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 24 Page 12

13 Pascal s Principle So far we have discovered (using Newton s Laws): Pressure depends on depth: p = ρ g y Pascal s Principle addresses how a change in pressure is transmitted through a fluid. Any change in the pressure applied to an enclosed fluid is transmitted to every portion of the fluid and to the walls of the containing vessel. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 25 Pascal s Principle in action Consider the system shown: A downward force F 1 is applied to the piston of area A 1. F1 F 2 This force is transmitted through the liquid to create an upward force F 2. Pascal s Principle says that increased pressure from F 1 (F 1 /A 1 ) is transmitted throughout the liquid. d 1 A A 2 1 d 2 F 2 > F 1 with conservation of energy Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 26 Page 13

14 Exercise Hydraulics: A force amplifier Aka the lever Consider the systems shown on right. In each case, a block of mass M is placed on the piston of the large cylinder, resulting in a difference d i in the liquid levels. d A M If A 2 = 2 A 1, compare d A and d B A 1 A10 V 10 = V 1 = V 2 d A A 1 = d B A 2 d A A 1 = d B 2A 1 d B M d A = d B 2 A 2 A10 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 27 Home Example Hydraulics: A force amplifier Aka the lever Consider the system shown on right. Blocks of mass M are placed on the piston of both cylinders. The small & large cylinders displace distances d 1 and d 2 Compare the forces on disks A 1 & A 2 ignoring the mass and weight of the fluid in this process M A 1 d 1 M A2 W 2 = - M g d 2 = - F 2 d 2 V 1 = V 2 = A 1 d 1 = A 2 d 2 W 1 = M g d 1 = F 1 d 1 W 1 + W 2 = 0 = F 1 d 1 - F 2 d 2 F 2 d 2 = F 1 d 1 F 2 = F 1 d 1 / d 2 = F 1 A 2 / A 1 d 1 / d 2 = A 2 / A 1 implying P 1 = P 2 = F 1 /A 1 = F 2 /A 2 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 28 Page 14

15 Fluids in Motion To describe fluid motion, we need something that describes flow: Velocity v There are different kinds of fluid flow of varying complexity non-steady / steady compressible / incompressible rotational / irrotational viscous / ideal Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 29 Types of Fluid Flow Laminar flow Each particle of the fluid follows a smooth path The paths of the different particles never cross each other The path taken by the particles is called a streamline Turbulent flow An irregular flow characterized by small whirlpool like regions Turbulent flow occurs when the particles go above some critical speed Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 30 Page 15

16 Types of Fluid Flow Laminar flow Each particle of the fluid follows a smooth path The paths of the different particles never cross each other The path taken by the particles is called a streamline Turbulent flow An irregular flow characterized by small whirlpool like regions Turbulent flow occurs when the particles go above some critical speed Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 31 Onset of Turbulent Flow The SeaWifS satellite image of a von Karman vortex around Guadalupe Island, August 20, 1999 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 32 Page 16

17 Ideal Fluids Fluid dynamics is very complicated in general (turbulence, vortices, etc.) Consider the simplest case first: the Ideal Fluid No viscosity - no flow resistance (no internal friction) Incompressible - density constant in space and time Simplest situation: consider ideal fluid moving with steady flow - velocity at each point in the flow is constant in time streamline A 2 A 1 In this case, fluid moves on streamlines v 1 v 2 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 33 Ideal Fluids Streamlines do not meet or cross Velocity vector is tangent to streamline streamline A 2 A 1 Volume of fluid follows a tube of flow bounded by streamlines v 1 v 2 Streamline density is proportional to velocity Flow obeys continuity equation Volume flow rate Q = A v is constant along flow tube. A 1 v 1 = A 2 v 2 Follows from mass conservation if flow is incompressible. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 34 Page 17

18 Exercise Continuity A housing contractor saves some money by reducing the size of a pipe from 1 diameter to 1/2 diameter at some point in your house. v 1 v 1/2 Assuming the water moving in the pipe is an ideal fluid, relative to its speed in the 1 diameter pipe, how fast is the water going in the 1/2 pipe? (A) 2 v 1 (B) 4 v 1 (C) 1/2 v 1 (D) 1/4 v 1 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 35 Exercise Continuity v 1 v 1/2 (A) 2 v 1 (B) 4 v 1 (C) 1/2 v 1 (D) 1/4 v 1 For equal volumes in equal times then ½ the diameter implies ¼ the area so the water has to flow four times as fast. But if the water is moving four times as fast then it has 16 times as much kinetic energy. Something must be doing work on the water (the pressure drops at the neck and we recast the work as P V = (F/A) (A x) = F x ) Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 36 Page 18

19 Lecture 20, Nov. 10 Question to ponder: Does heavy water (D 2 0) ice sink or float? Assignment HW9, Due Wednesday, Nov. 19 th Wednesday: Read all of Chapter 16 Next slides are possible for Wednesday Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 37 Conservation of Energy for Ideal Fluid Recall the standard work-energy relation W = K = K f K i Apply the principle to a section of flowing fluid with volume V and mass m = ρ V (here W is work done on fluid) Net work by pressure difference over x ( x 1 = v 1 t) W = F 1 x 1 F 2 x 2 = (F 1 /A 1 ) (A 1 x 1 ) (F 2 /A 2 ) (A 2 x 2 ) = P 1 V 1 P 2 V 2 v 2 and V 1 = V 2 = V (incompressible) y 2 W = (P 1 P 2 ) V v 1 V p 2 y 1 p 1 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 38 Page 19

20 W Conservation of Energy for Ideal Fluid = (P 1 P 2 ) V and W = ½ m v 2 2 ½ m v 1 2 = ½ (ρ V) v 2 2 ½ (ρ V) v 1 2 (P 1 P 2 ) = ½ ρ v 22 ½ ρ v 1 2 v 2 P 1 + ½ ρ v 1 2 = P 2 + ½ ρ v 2 2 = const. y 2 v 1 V p 2 y 1 p 1 Bernoulli Equation P 1 + ½ ρ v ρ g y 1 = constant Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 39 This leads to Conservation of Energy for Ideal Fluid P 1 + ½ ρ v 12 = P 2 + ½ ρ v 22 = const. and with height variations v 2 y 2 v 1 V p 2 y 1 p 1 Bernoulli s Equation P 1 + ½ ρ v ρ g y 1 = constant Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 40 Page 20

21 Bernoulli s Principle A housing contractor saves some money by reducing the size of a pipe from 1 diameter to 1/2 diameter at some point in your house. v 1 v 1/2 2) What is the pressure in the 1/2 pipe relative to the 1 pipe? (A) smaller (B) same (C) larger Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 41 Cavitation Venturi result In the vicinity of high velocity fluids, the pressure can gets so low that the fluid vaporizes. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 42 Page 21

22 Applications of Fluid Dynamics Streamline flow around a moving airplane wing Lift is the upward force on the wing from the air Drag is the resistance The lift depends on the speed of the airplane, the area of the wing, its curvature, and the angle between the wing and the horizontal higher velocity lower pressure lower velocity higher pressure Note: density of flow lines reflects velocity, not density. We are assuming an incompressible fluid. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 43 Elastic properties of solids : Some definitions Young s modulus: measures the resistance of a solid to a change in its length. L 0 L F elasticity in length Y = tensile tensile stress strain = F / A0 L / L 0 volume elasticity Bulk modulus: measures the resistance of solids or liquids to changes in their volume. F / A0 B = V / V 0 V 0 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 44 F V 0 - V Page 22

23 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 45 EXAMPLE An irrigation system QUESTION: Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 46 Page 23

24 EXAMPLE An irrigation system Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 47 EXAMPLE An irrigation system Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 48 Page 24

25 EXAMPLE An irrigation system Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 49 EXAMPLE An irrigation system Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 50 Page 25

26 Elasticity Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 51 Elasticity F/A is proportional to L/L. We can write the proportionality as The proportionality constant Y is called Young s modulus. The quantity F/A is called the tensile stress. The quantity L/L, the fractional increase in length, is called strain. With these definitions, we can write Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 52 Page 26

27 EXAMPLE Stretching a wire QUESTIONS: Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 53 EXAMPLE Stretching a wire Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 54 Page 27

28 EXAMPLE Stretching a wire Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 55 Volume Stress and the Bulk Modulus Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 56 Page 28

29 Volume Stress and the Bulk Modulus A volume stress applied to an object compresses its volume slightly. The volume strain is defined as V/V, and is negative when the volume decreases. Volume stress is the same as the pressure. where B is called the bulk modulus. The negative sign in the equation ensures that the pressure is a positive number. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 57 The figure shows volume flow rates (in cm 3 /s) for all but one tube. What is the volume flow rate through the unmarked tube? Is the flow direction in or out? A. 1 cm 3 /s, in B. 1 cm 3 /s, out C. 10 cm 3 /s, in D. 10 cm 3 /s, out E. It depends on the relative size of the tubes. Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 58 Page 29

30 Rank in order, from highest to lowest, the liquid heights h 1 to h 4 in tubes 1 to 4. The air flow is from left to right. A. h 1 > h 2 = h 3 = h 4 B. h 2 > h 4 > h 3 > h 1 C. h 2 = h 3 = h 4 > h 1 D. h 3 > h 4 > h 2 > h 1 E. h 1 > h 3 > h 4 > h 2 Physics 207: Lecture 20, Pg 59 Page 30

Chapter 14. Lecture 1 Fluid Mechanics. Dr. Armen Kocharian

Chapter 14. Lecture 1 Fluid Mechanics. Dr. Armen Kocharian Chapter 14 Lecture 1 Fluid Mechanics Dr. Armen Kocharian States of Matter Solid Has a definite volume and shape Liquid Has a definite volume but not a definite shape Gas unconfined Has neither a definite

More information

Physics 207 Lecture 22. Lecture 22

Physics 207 Lecture 22. Lecture 22 Goals: Lecture Chapter 15 Use an ideal-fluid model to study fluid flow. Investigate the elastic deformation of solids and liquids Chapter 16 Recognize and use the state variables that characterize macroscopic

More information

Nicholas J. Giordano. Chapter 10 Fluids

Nicholas J. Giordano.  Chapter 10 Fluids Nicholas J. Giordano www.cengage.com/physics/giordano Chapter 10 Fluids Fluids A fluid may be either a liquid or a gas Some characteristics of a fluid Flows from one place to another Shape varies according

More information

Physics 201 Chapter 13 Lecture 1

Physics 201 Chapter 13 Lecture 1 Physics 201 Chapter 13 Lecture 1 Fluid Statics Pascal s Principle Archimedes Principle (Buoyancy) Fluid Dynamics Continuity Equation Bernoulli Equation 11/30/2009 Physics 201, UW-Madison 1 Fluids Density

More information

Fluid Mechanics. Chapter 12. PowerPoint Lectures for University Physics, Thirteenth Edition Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman

Fluid Mechanics. Chapter 12. PowerPoint Lectures for University Physics, Thirteenth Edition Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman Chapter 12 Fluid Mechanics PowerPoint Lectures for University Physics, Thirteenth Edition Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman Lectures by Wayne Anderson Goals for Chapter 12 To study the concept of density

More information

Lecture 8 Equilibrium and Elasticity

Lecture 8 Equilibrium and Elasticity Lecture 8 Equilibrium and Elasticity July 19 EQUILIBRIUM AND ELASTICITY CHAPTER 12 Give a sharp blow one end of a stick on the table. Find center of percussion. Baseball bat center of percussion Equilibrium

More information

Fluids. Fluid = Gas or Liquid. Density Pressure in a Fluid Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle Fluids in Motion

Fluids. Fluid = Gas or Liquid. Density Pressure in a Fluid Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle Fluids in Motion Chapter 14 Fluids Fluids Density Pressure in a Fluid Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle Fluids in Motion Fluid = Gas or Liquid MFMcGraw-PHY45 Chap_14Ha-Fluids-Revised 10/13/01 Densities MFMcGraw-PHY45 Chap_14Ha-Fluids-Revised

More information

Fluids, Continuity, and Bernouli

Fluids, Continuity, and Bernouli Fluids, Continuity, and Bernouli Announcements: Exam Tomorrow at 7:30pm in same rooms as before. Web page: http://www.colorado.edu/physics/phys1110/phys1110_sp12/ Clicker question 1 A satellite, mass m,

More information

Fluid Mechanics. Chapter 14. Modified by P. Lam 6_7_2012

Fluid Mechanics. Chapter 14. Modified by P. Lam 6_7_2012 Chapter 14 Fluid Mechanics PowerPoint Lectures for University Physics, Twelfth Edition Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman Lectures by James Pazun Modified by P. Lam 6_7_2012 Goals for Chapter 14 To study

More information

Physics 201 Chapter 13 Lecture 1

Physics 201 Chapter 13 Lecture 1 Physics 201 Chapter 13 Lecture 1 Fluid Statics Pascal s Principle Archimedes Principle (Buoyancy) Fluid Dynamics Continuity Equation Bernoulli Equation 11/30/2009 Physics 201, UW-Madison 1 Fluids Density

More information

Fluids. Fluids in Motion or Fluid Dynamics

Fluids. Fluids in Motion or Fluid Dynamics Fluids Fluids in Motion or Fluid Dynamics Resources: Serway - Chapter 9: 9.7-9.8 Physics B Lesson 3: Fluid Flow Continuity Physics B Lesson 4: Bernoulli's Equation MIT - 8: Hydrostatics, Archimedes' Principle,

More information

Chapter 15: Fluid Mechanics Dynamics Using Pascal s Law = F 1 = F 2 2 = F 2 A 2

Chapter 15: Fluid Mechanics Dynamics Using Pascal s Law = F 1 = F 2 2 = F 2 A 2 Lecture 24: Archimedes Principle and Bernoulli s Law 1 Chapter 15: Fluid Mechanics Dynamics Using Pascal s Law Example 15.1 The hydraulic lift A hydraulic lift consists of a small diameter piston of radius

More information

Chapter 15: Fluids. Mass Density = Volume. note : Fluids: substances which flow

Chapter 15: Fluids. Mass Density = Volume. note : Fluids: substances which flow Fluids: substances which flow Chapter 5: Fluids Liquids: take the shape of their container but have a definite volume Gases: take the shape and volume of their container Density m ρ = V Mass Density =

More information

Today s Discussion: Fluids Pressure and Pascal s principle Bouyancy, Archimedes principle Bernoulli s equation

Today s Discussion: Fluids Pressure and Pascal s principle Bouyancy, Archimedes principle Bernoulli s equation 1 Physics 213 Waves, Fluids and Thermal Physics Summer 2007 Lecturer: Mike Kagan (mak411@psu.edu, 322 Whitmore) Today s Discussion: Fluids Pressure and Pascal s principle Bouyancy, Archimedes principle

More information

Liquids CHAPTER 13 FLUIDS FLUIDS. Gases. Density! Bulk modulus! Compressibility. To begin with... some important definitions...

Liquids CHAPTER 13 FLUIDS FLUIDS. Gases. Density! Bulk modulus! Compressibility. To begin with... some important definitions... CHAPTER 13 FLUIDS FLUIDS Liquids Gases Density! Bulk modulus! Compressibility Pressure in a fluid! Hydraulic lift! Hydrostatic paradox Measurement of pressure! Manometers and barometers Buoyancy and Archimedes

More information

Fluid Dynamics. Equation of continuity Bernoulli s Equation Bernoulli s Application Viscosity Poiseuilles law Stokes law Reynolds Number

Fluid Dynamics. Equation of continuity Bernoulli s Equation Bernoulli s Application Viscosity Poiseuilles law Stokes law Reynolds Number Fluid Dynamics Equation of continuity Bernoulli s Equation Bernoulli s Application Viscosity Poiseuilles law Stokes law Reynolds Number Fluids in Motion steady or laminar flow, if each particle of the

More information

cos(θ)sin(θ) Alternative Exercise Correct Correct θ = 0 skiladæmi 10 Part A Part B Part C Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, November 11, 2015

cos(θ)sin(θ) Alternative Exercise Correct Correct θ = 0 skiladæmi 10 Part A Part B Part C Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 skiladæmi 10 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, November 11, 015 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due Grading Policy Alternative Exercise 1115 A bar with cross sectional

More information

10 - FLUID MECHANICS Page 1

10 - FLUID MECHANICS Page 1 0 - FLUID MECHANICS Page Introduction Fluid is a matter in a state which can flow. Liquids, gases, molten metal and tar are examples of fluids. Fluid mechanics is studied in two parts: ( i ) Fluid statics

More information

States of Matter Unit

States of Matter Unit Learning Target Notes Section 1: Matter and Energy What makes up matter? Matter is made of atoms and molecules that are in constant motion. Kinetic Theory of Matter A. Particles that make up matter are

More information

Chapter 9 Fluids. Pressure

Chapter 9 Fluids. Pressure Chapter 9 Fluids States of Matter - Solid, liquid, gas. Fluids (liquids and gases) do not hold their shapes. In many cases we can think of liquids as being incompressible. Liquids do not change their volume

More information

Physics 231 Lecture 23

Physics 231 Lecture 23 Physics 31 Lecture 3 Main points of today s lecture: Gravitation potential energy GM1M PEgrav r 1 Tensile stress and strain Δ Y ΔL L 0 Bulk stress and strain: Δ V Δ P B Δ V Pressure in fluids: P ; Pbot

More information

Section 1 Matter and Energy

Section 1 Matter and Energy CHAPTER OUTLINE Section 1 Matter and Energy Key Idea questions > What makes up matter? > What is the difference between a solid, a liquid, and a gas? > What kind of energy do all particles of matter have?

More information

Summary PHY101 ( 2 ) T / Hanadi Al Harbi

Summary PHY101 ( 2 ) T / Hanadi Al Harbi الكمية Physical Quantity القانون Low التعريف Definition الوحدة SI Unit Linear Momentum P = mθ be equal to the mass of an object times its velocity. Kg. m/s vector quantity Stress F \ A the external force

More information

Steven Burian Civil & Environmental Engineering September 25, 2013

Steven Burian Civil & Environmental Engineering September 25, 2013 Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Mechanics Steven Burian Civil & Environmental Engineering September 25, 2013 s and FE Morning ( Mechanics) A. Flow measurement 7% of FE Morning B. properties Session

More information

Physics 101: Lecture 17 Fluids

Physics 101: Lecture 17 Fluids Exam III Physics 101: Lecture 17 Fluids Exam 2 is Mon Nov. 4, 7pm Extra office hours on Fri. (see webpage!) Physics 101: Lecture 17, Pg 1 Homework 9 Help A block of mass M 1 = 3 kg rests on a table with

More information

There are three phases of matter: Solid, liquid and gas

There are three phases of matter: Solid, liquid and gas FLUIDS: Gases and Liquids Chapter 4 of text There are three phases of matter: Solid, liquid and gas Solids: Have form, constituents ( atoms and molecules) are in fixed positions (though they can vibrate

More information

Pressure in stationary and moving fluid Lab- Lab On- On Chip: Lecture 2

Pressure in stationary and moving fluid Lab- Lab On- On Chip: Lecture 2 Pressure in stationary and moving fluid Lab-On-Chip: Lecture Lecture plan what is pressure e and how it s distributed in static fluid water pressure in engineering problems buoyancy y and archimedes law;

More information

Pressure in stationary and moving fluid. Lab-On-Chip: Lecture 2

Pressure in stationary and moving fluid. Lab-On-Chip: Lecture 2 Pressure in stationary and moving fluid Lab-On-Chip: Lecture Fluid Statics No shearing stress.no relative movement between adjacent fluid particles, i.e. static or moving as a single block Pressure at

More information

States of Matter. Physics 201, Lecture 25. Density ρ. Fluids

States of Matter. Physics 201, Lecture 25. Density ρ. Fluids Physics 201, Lecture 25 Today s Topics n Fluid Mechanics (chapter 14) n Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasmas n Pressure (14.1) n Pascal s Principle, Pressure Variation with Depth (14.2) n Pressure Measurement

More information

M o d u l e B a s i c A e r o d y n a m i c s

M o d u l e B a s i c A e r o d y n a m i c s Category A B1 B2 B3 Level 1 2 3 M o d u l e 0 8-0 1 B a s i c A e r o d y n a m i c s P h y s i c s o f t h e A t m o s p h e r e 08-01- 1 Category A B1 B2 B3 Level 1 2 3 T a b l e o f c o n t e n t s

More information

ME-B41 Lab 1: Hydrostatics. Experimental Procedures

ME-B41 Lab 1: Hydrostatics. Experimental Procedures ME-B41 Lab 1: Hydrostatics In this lab you will do four brief experiments related to the following topics: manometry, buoyancy, forces on submerged planes, and hydraulics (a hydraulic jack). Each experiment

More information

5.1 Fluid momentum equation Hydrostatics Archimedes theorem The vorticity equation... 42

5.1 Fluid momentum equation Hydrostatics Archimedes theorem The vorticity equation... 42 Chapter 5 Euler s equation Contents 5.1 Fluid momentum equation........................ 39 5. Hydrostatics................................ 40 5.3 Archimedes theorem........................... 41 5.4 The

More information

CE MECHANICS OF FLUIDS

CE MECHANICS OF FLUIDS CE60 - MECHANICS OF FLUIDS (FOR III SEMESTER) UNIT II FLUID STATICS & KINEMATICS PREPARED BY R.SURYA, M.E Assistant Professor DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING SRI VIDYA COLLEGE

More information

Lecture 27 (Walker: ) Fluid Dynamics Nov. 9, 2009

Lecture 27 (Walker: ) Fluid Dynamics Nov. 9, 2009 Physics 111 Lecture 27 (Walker: 15.5-7) Fluid Dynamics Nov. 9, 2009 Midterm #2 - Monday Nov. 16 Chap. 7,Chap. 8 (not 8.5) Chap. 9 (not 9.6, 9.8) Chap. 10, Chap. 11 (not 11.8-9) Chap. 13 (not 13.6-8) Chap.

More information

Matter and Thermal Energy

Matter and Thermal Energy Section States of Matter Can you identify the states of matter present in the photo shown? Kinetic Theory The kinetic theory is an explanation of how particles in matter behave. Kinetic Theory The three

More information

Physical Science. Thermal Energy & Heat

Physical Science. Thermal Energy & Heat Physical Science Thermal Energy & Heat Sometimes called internal energy Depends on the object's mass, temperature, and phase (solid, liquid, gas) TOTAL potential and kinetic energy of all the particles

More information

1) Law of Orbits - all planets move in elliptical orbits with the Sun at one focus

1) Law of Orbits - all planets move in elliptical orbits with the Sun at one focus 1) Law of Orbits - all planets move in elliptical orbits with the Sun at one focus 2) Law of equal areas - ANGULAR MOMENTUM IS CONSERVED A line that connects a planet to the Sun sweeps out equal areas

More information

Conceptual Physics Matter Liquids Gases

Conceptual Physics Matter Liquids Gases Conceptual Physics Matter Liquids Gases Lana Sheridan De Anza College July 19, 2016 Last time the atom history of our understanding of the atom solids density Overview elasticity liquids pressure buoyancy

More information

1. Introduction, fluid properties (1.1, 2.8, 4.1, and handouts)

1. Introduction, fluid properties (1.1, 2.8, 4.1, and handouts) 1. Introduction, fluid properties (1.1, 2.8, 4.1, and handouts) Introduction, general information Course overview Fluids as a continuum Density Compressibility Viscosity Exercises: A1 Fluid mechanics Fluid

More information

CHAPTER 4 - STATES OF MATTER. Mr. Polard Physical Science Ingomar Middle School

CHAPTER 4 - STATES OF MATTER. Mr. Polard Physical Science Ingomar Middle School CHAPTER 4 - STATES OF MATTER Mr. Polard Physical Science Ingomar Middle School SECTION 1 MATTER VOCABULARY SECTION 1 Matter : anything that takes up space and has mass (pg 72, 102) Solid : Matter with

More information

CLASS SCHEDULE 2013 FALL

CLASS SCHEDULE 2013 FALL CLASS SCHEDULE 2013 FALL Class # or Lab # 1 Date Aug 26 2 28 Important Concepts (Section # in Text Reading, Lecture note) Examples/Lab Activities Definition fluid; continuum hypothesis; fluid properties

More information

DENSITY OF AN IRREGULAR SHAPED OBJECT

DENSITY OF AN IRREGULAR SHAPED OBJECT MASS 9/28/2017 AP PHYSICS 2 DENSITY UNIT 1 FLUID STATICS AND DYNAMICS CHAPTER 10 FLUIDS AT REST 0.12 0.1 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0 MASS vs. VOLUME y = 1000x 0 0.00002 0.00004 0.00006 0.00008 0.0001 0.00012

More information

PHY121 Physics for the Life Sciences I

PHY121 Physics for the Life Sciences I PHY Physics for the Life Sciences I Lecture 0. Fluid flow: kinematics describing the motion. Fluid flow: dynamics causes and effects, Bernoulli s Equation 3. Viscosity and Poiseuille s Law for narrow tubes

More information

43. A person sits on a freely spinning lab stool that has no friction in its axle. When this person extends her arms,

43. A person sits on a freely spinning lab stool that has no friction in its axle. When this person extends her arms, 43. A person sits on a freely spinning lab stool that has no friction in its axle. When this person extends her arms, A) her moment of inertia increases and her rotational kinetic energy remains the same.

More information

Chapter 13. liquids. gases. 1) Fluids exert pressure. a) because they're made up of matter with forces applied between (I.M.F.)

Chapter 13. liquids. gases. 1) Fluids exert pressure. a) because they're made up of matter with forces applied between (I.M.F.) \ Chapter 13 Fluids 1) Fluids exert pressure a) because they're made up of matter with forces applied between (I.M.F.) liquids gases b) they are made of matter in constant motion colliding with other matter

More information

Page 1. Chapters 2, 3 (linear) 9 (rotational) Final Exam: Wednesday, May 11, 10:05 am - 12:05 pm, BASCOM 272

Page 1. Chapters 2, 3 (linear) 9 (rotational) Final Exam: Wednesday, May 11, 10:05 am - 12:05 pm, BASCOM 272 Final Exam: Wednesday, May 11, 10:05 am - 12:05 pm, BASCOM 272 The exam will cover chapters 1 14 The exam will have about 30 multiple choice questions Consultations hours the same as before. Another review

More information

Lecture 30 (Walker: ) Fluid Dynamics April 15, 2009

Lecture 30 (Walker: ) Fluid Dynamics April 15, 2009 Physics 111 Lecture 30 (Walker: 15.6-7) Fluid Dynamics April 15, 2009 Midterm #2 - Monday April 20 Chap. 7,Chap. 8 (not 8.5) Chap. 9 (not 9.6, 9.8) Chap. 10, Chap. 11 (not 11.8-9) Chap. 13 (not 13.6-8)

More information

Momentum Circular Motion and Gravitation Rotational Motion Fluid Mechanics

Momentum Circular Motion and Gravitation Rotational Motion Fluid Mechanics Momentum Circular Motion and Gravitation Rotational Motion Fluid Mechanics Momentum Momentum Collisions between objects can be evaluated using the laws of conservation of energy and of momentum. Momentum

More information

Physics. Assignment-1(UNITS AND MEASUREMENT)

Physics. Assignment-1(UNITS AND MEASUREMENT) Assignment-1(UNITS AND MEASUREMENT) 1. Define physical quantity and write steps for measurement. 2. What are fundamental units and derived units? 3. List the seven basic and two supplementary physical

More information

Introductory Physics PHYS101

Introductory Physics PHYS101 Introductory Physics PHYS101 Dr Richard H. Cyburt Office Hours Assistant Professor of Physics My office: 402c in the Science Building My phone: (304) 384-6006 My email: rcyburt@concord.edu TRF 9:30-11:00am

More information

Fluids, Thermodynamics, Waves, and Optics Fluids

Fluids, Thermodynamics, Waves, and Optics Fluids Fluids, Thermodynamics, Waves, and Optics Fluids Lana Sheridan De Anza College April 10, 2018 Overview static fluids pressure liquid pressure Pascal s law Elastic Properties of Solids We are considering

More information

Solution The light plates are at the same heights. In balance, the pressure at both plates has to be the same. m g A A A F A = F B.

Solution The light plates are at the same heights. In balance, the pressure at both plates has to be the same. m g A A A F A = F B. 43. A piece of metal rests in a toy wood boat floating in water in a bathtub. If the metal is removed from the boat, and kept out of the water, what happens to the water level in the tub? A) It does not

More information

EQUILIBRIUM OBJECTIVES PRE-LECTURE

EQUILIBRIUM OBJECTIVES PRE-LECTURE 27 FE3 EQUILIBRIUM Aims OBJECTIVES In this chapter you will learn the concepts and principles needed to understand mechanical equilibrium. You should be able to demonstrate your understanding by analysing

More information

Chapter: States of Matter

Chapter: States of Matter Table of Contents Chapter: States of Matter Section 1: Matter Section 2: Changes of State Section 3: Behavior of Fluids 1 What is matter? Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Matter Matter

More information

Chapter 15 - Fluid Mechanics Thursday, March 24 th

Chapter 15 - Fluid Mechanics Thursday, March 24 th Chapter 15 - Fluid Mechanics Thursday, March 24 th Fluids Static properties Density and pressure Hydrostatic equilibrium Archimedes principle and buoyancy Fluid Motion The continuity equation Bernoulli

More information

d. a possible answer to a scientific question.

d. a possible answer to a scientific question. A hypothesis is a. a way to share ideas with other scientists. b. a summary of what was learned. c. the observations made during an experiment. d. a possible answer to a scientific question. A hypothesis

More information

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I. Professor Meade Brooks, Collin College. Chapter 12: STATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND ELASTICITY

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I. Professor Meade Brooks, Collin College. Chapter 12: STATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND ELASTICITY UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I Professor Meade Brooks, Collin College Chapter 12: STATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND ELASTICITY Two stilt walkers in standing position. All forces acting on each stilt walker balance out; neither

More information

Types of Forces. Pressure Buoyant Force Friction Normal Force

Types of Forces. Pressure Buoyant Force Friction Normal Force Types of Forces Pressure Buoyant Force Friction Normal Force Pressure Ratio of Force Per Unit Area p = F A P = N/m 2 = 1 pascal (very small) P= lbs/in 2 = psi = pounds per square inch Example: Snow Shoes

More information

Fluids: How thick are liquids?

Fluids: How thick are liquids? Fluids: How thick are liquids? Student Advanced Version Introduction: Fluids are substances that can flow under an applied force. What are some examples of fluids? We often think of fluids as substances

More information

Figure 1 Answer: = m

Figure 1 Answer: = m Q1. Figure 1 shows a solid cylindrical steel rod of length =.0 m and diameter D =.0 cm. What will be increase in its length when m = 80 kg block is attached to its bottom end? (Young's modulus of steel

More information

Thermal physics revision questions

Thermal physics revision questions Thermal physics revision questions ONE SECTION OF QUESTIONS TO BE COMPLETED AND MARKED EVERY WEEK AFTER HALF TERM. Section 1: Energy 1. Define the law of conservation of energy. Energy is neither created

More information

! =!"#$% exerted by a fluid (liquid or gas) !"#$ =!"# FUNDAMENTAL AND MEASURABLE INTENSIVE PROPERTIES PRESSURE, TEMPERATURE AND SPECIFIC VOLUME

! =!#$% exerted by a fluid (liquid or gas) !#$ =!# FUNDAMENTAL AND MEASURABLE INTENSIVE PROPERTIES PRESSURE, TEMPERATURE AND SPECIFIC VOLUME FUNDAMENTAL AND MEASURABLE INTENSIVE PROPERTIES PRESSURE, TEMPERATURE AND SPECIFIC VOLUME PRESSURE, P! =!"#$%!"#! exerted by a fluid (liquid or gas) Thermodynamic importance of pressure One of two independent

More information

M E 320 Supplementary Material Pralav Shetty

M E 320 Supplementary Material Pralav Shetty M E 320 Supplementary Material Pralav Shetty Note: In order to view the demonstrations below, you must first download CDF player to your PC/Mac/Linux. Link for CDF player http://www.wolfram.com/cdf-player/

More information

Forces. Name and Surname: Class: L E A R N I N G O U T C O M E S. What is a force? How are forces measured? What do forces do?

Forces. Name and Surname: Class: L E A R N I N G O U T C O M E S. What is a force? How are forces measured? What do forces do? F O R C E S P A G E 1 L E A R N I N G O U T C O M E S Forces What is a force? Y E A R 9, C H A P T E R 2 G J Z A H R A B. E D ( H O N S ) How are forces measured? What do forces do? Why do we need to think

More information

Fluidi. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

Fluidi. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Fluidi 11.1 Mass Density DEFINITION OF MASS DENSITY The mass density of a substance is the mass of a substance divided by its volume: m V SI Unit of Mass Density: kg/m3 11.1 Mass Density 11.1 Mass Density

More information

TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, DIVISION OF PHYSICS 13. STOKES METHOD

TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, DIVISION OF PHYSICS 13. STOKES METHOD 13. STOKES METHOD 1. Objective To determine the coefficient of viscosity of a known fluid using Stokes method.. Equipment needed A glass vessel with glycerine, micrometer calliper, stopwatch, ruler. 3.

More information

Unit 4 Mass, Weight, and Density

Unit 4 Mass, Weight, and Density Unit 4 Mass, Weight, and Density Lesson Objectives State that mass is a measure of the amount of substance in a body State that the mass of a body resists a change in the state of rest or motion of the

More information

Topic: Fluids PHYSICS 231

Topic: Fluids PHYSICS 231 Topic: Fluids PHYSICS 231 Key Concepts Density, Volume, Mass density as material property Pressure units, how to measure, direction Hydrostatic pressure in liquid on earth Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle

More information

Physics 207 Lecture 25. Lecture 25. HW11, Due Tuesday, May 6 th For Thursday, read through all of Chapter 18. Angular Momentum Exercise

Physics 207 Lecture 25. Lecture 25. HW11, Due Tuesday, May 6 th For Thursday, read through all of Chapter 18. Angular Momentum Exercise Lecture 5 Today Review: Exam covers Chapters 14-17 17 plus angular momentum, rolling motion & torque Assignment HW11, Due Tuesday, May 6 th For Thursday, read through all of Chapter 18 Physics 07: Lecture

More information

ANSWERS 403 INDEX. Bulk modulus 238 Buoyant force 251

ANSWERS 403 INDEX. Bulk modulus 238 Buoyant force 251 ANSWERS 403 INDEX A Absolute scale temperature 276 Absolute zero 276 Acceleration (linear) 45 Acceleration due to gravity 49,189 Accuracy 22 Action-reaction 97 Addition of vectors 67 Adiabatic process

More information

You are responsible for recording your 9 digit PSU Student ID on your scantron form

You are responsible for recording your 9 digit PSU Student ID on your scantron form Tuesday, July 28; 9:35AM 10:50AM in 273 Willard 20 Mul=ple Choice Ques=ons See Folder in Exam Resources Midterm 2 Informa=on You are responsible for recording your 9 digit PSU Student ID on your scantron

More information

Fluids, Thermodynamics, Waves, and Optics Overview of Course Fluids

Fluids, Thermodynamics, Waves, and Optics Overview of Course Fluids Fluids, Thermodynamics, Waves, and Optics Overview of Course Fluids Lana Sheridan De Anza College April 10, 2017 Overview of the Course There are 4 main sections to this course. Topics fluids thermodynamics

More information

Theory and Fundamental of Fluid Mechanics

Theory and Fundamental of Fluid Mechanics 1 2 Lecture (1) on Fayoum University Theory and Fundamental of Fluid Mechanics By Dr. Emad M. Saad Mechanical Engineering Dept. Faculty of Engineering Fayoum University Faculty of Engineering Mechanical

More information

Fluid Mechanics II Viscosity and shear stresses

Fluid Mechanics II Viscosity and shear stresses Fluid Mechanics II Viscosity and shear stresses Shear stresses in a Newtonian fluid A fluid at rest can not resist shearing forces. Under the action of such forces it deforms continuously, however small

More information

PART 1B EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. SUBJECT: FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER LOCATION: HYDRAULICS LAB (Gnd Floor Inglis Bldg) BOUNDARY LAYERS AND DRAG

PART 1B EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. SUBJECT: FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER LOCATION: HYDRAULICS LAB (Gnd Floor Inglis Bldg) BOUNDARY LAYERS AND DRAG 1 PART 1B EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING SUBJECT: FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER LOCATION: HYDRAULICS LAB (Gnd Floor Inglis Bldg) EXPERIMENT T3 (LONG) BOUNDARY LAYERS AND DRAG OBJECTIVES a) To measure the velocity

More information

Friction Factors and Drag Coefficients

Friction Factors and Drag Coefficients Levicky 1 Friction Factors and Drag Coefficients Several equations that we have seen have included terms to represent dissipation of energy due to the viscous nature of fluid flow. For example, in the

More information

Pressure and Flow Characteristics

Pressure and Flow Characteristics Pressure and Flow Characteristics Continuing Education from the American Society of Plumbing Engineers August 2015 ASPE.ORG/ReadLearnEarn CEU 226 READ, LEARN, EARN Note: In determining your answers to

More information

CHAPTER 10- GRAVITATION

CHAPTER 10- GRAVITATION CHAPTER 10- GRAVITATION KEY CONCEPTS [ *rating as per the significance of concept] 1 Gravitation *** 2 Universal Law Of Gravitation **** 3 Free Fall ** 4 To Calculate The Value Of G **** 5 Mass & Weight

More information

PHYSICS. Chapter 5 Lecture FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS A STRATEGIC APPROACH 4/E RANDALL D. KNIGHT Pearson Education, Inc.

PHYSICS. Chapter 5 Lecture FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS A STRATEGIC APPROACH 4/E RANDALL D. KNIGHT Pearson Education, Inc. PHYSICS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS A STRATEGIC APPROACH 4/E Chapter 5 Lecture RANDALL D. KNIGHT Chapter 5 Force and Motion IN THIS CHAPTER, you will learn about the connection between force and motion.

More information

CHAPTER 2 Pressure and Head

CHAPTER 2 Pressure and Head FLUID MECHANICS Gaza, Sep. 2012 CHAPTER 2 Pressure and Head Dr. Khalil Mahmoud ALASTAL Objectives of this Chapter: Introduce the concept of pressure. Prove it has a unique value at any particular elevation.

More information

UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA. All questions are of equal value. No marks are subtracted for wrong answers.

UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA. All questions are of equal value. No marks are subtracted for wrong answers. (3:30 pm 6:30 pm) PAGE NO.: 1 of 7 All questions are of equal value. No marks are subtracted for wrong answers. Record all answers on the computer score sheet provided. USE PENCIL ONLY! Black pen will

More information

1 Lecture 5. Linear Momentum and Collisions Elastic Properties of Solids

1 Lecture 5. Linear Momentum and Collisions Elastic Properties of Solids 1 Lecture 5 Linear Momentum and Collisions Elastic Properties of Solids 2 Linear Momentum and Collisions 3 Linear Momentum Is defined to be equal to the mass of an object times its velocity. P = m θ Momentum

More information

Notes for Lecture 2 Fluids Buoyancy Fluid Dynamics Bernoulli s Equation

Notes for Lecture 2 Fluids Buoyancy Fluid Dynamics Bernoulli s Equation Notes for Lecture 2 Fluids Buoyancy Fluid Dynamics Bernoulli s Equation Lana Sheridan De Anza College April 12, 2017 Last time introduction to static fluids pressure and depth Pascal s principle measurements

More information

Chapter 13 ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS

Chapter 13 ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS Physics Including Human Applications 280 Chapter 13 ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS GOALS When you have mastered the contents of this chapter, you will be able to achieve the following goals: Definitions

More information

Physics *P43118A0128* Pearson Edexcel GCE P43118A. Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Physics on the Go. Tuesday 20 May 2014 Morning Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

Physics *P43118A0128* Pearson Edexcel GCE P43118A. Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Physics on the Go. Tuesday 20 May 2014 Morning Time: 1 hour 30 minutes Write your name here Surname Other names Pearson Edexcel GCE Physics Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Physics on the Go Centre Number Candidate Number Tuesday 20 May 2014 Morning Time: 1 hour 30 minutes You

More information

Figure 3: Problem 7. (a) 0.9 m (b) 1.8 m (c) 2.7 m (d) 3.6 m

Figure 3: Problem 7. (a) 0.9 m (b) 1.8 m (c) 2.7 m (d) 3.6 m 1. For the manometer shown in figure 1, if the absolute pressure at point A is 1.013 10 5 Pa, the absolute pressure at point B is (ρ water =10 3 kg/m 3, ρ Hg =13.56 10 3 kg/m 3, ρ oil = 800kg/m 3 ): (a)

More information

Notes: Most of the material in this chapter is taken from Young and Freedman, Chap. 12.

Notes: Most of the material in this chapter is taken from Young and Freedman, Chap. 12. Capter 6. Fluid Mecanics Notes: Most of te material in tis capter is taken from Young and Freedman, Cap. 12. 6.1 Fluid Statics Fluids, i.e., substances tat can flow, are te subjects of tis capter. But

More information

Note on Posted Slides. Net Force. Normal Force a.k.a. Support Force. PHY205H1S Physics of Everyday Life Class 3. Review from Class 1: What is a force?

Note on Posted Slides. Net Force. Normal Force a.k.a. Support Force. PHY205H1S Physics of Everyday Life Class 3. Review from Class 1: What is a force? Note on Posted Slides These are the slides that I intended to show in class on Tue. Jan. 14, 014. They contain important ideas and questions from your reading. Due to time constraints, I was probably not

More information

Upthrust and Archimedes Principle

Upthrust and Archimedes Principle 1 Upthrust and Archimedes Principle Objects immersed in fluids, experience a force which tends to push them towards the surface of the liquid. This force is called upthrust and it depends on the density

More information

Aerodynamics. Basic Aerodynamics. Continuity equation (mass conserved) Some thermodynamics. Energy equation (energy conserved)

Aerodynamics. Basic Aerodynamics. Continuity equation (mass conserved) Some thermodynamics. Energy equation (energy conserved) Flow with no friction (inviscid) Aerodynamics Basic Aerodynamics Continuity equation (mass conserved) Flow with friction (viscous) Momentum equation (F = ma) 1. Euler s equation 2. Bernoulli s equation

More information

Universität Duisburg-Essen Fakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften WS 2012 Maschinenbau, IVG, Thermodynamik Dr. M. A. Siddiqi

Universität Duisburg-Essen Fakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften WS 2012 Maschinenbau, IVG, Thermodynamik Dr. M. A. Siddiqi 1 Universität Duisburg-Essen 3. Semester Fakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften WS 2012 Maschinenbau, IVG, Thermodynamik Dr. M. A. Siddiqi THERMODYNAMICS LAB (ISE) Pressure Measurement 2 2 Pressure Measurement

More information

Physics General Physics. Lecture 21 Fluids in Motion. Fall 2016 Semester Prof. Matthew Jones

Physics General Physics. Lecture 21 Fluids in Motion. Fall 2016 Semester Prof. Matthew Jones Physics 22000 General Physics Lecture 21 Fluids in Motion Fall 2016 Semester Prof. Matthew Jones 1 Second Midterm Exam Wednesday, November 16 th, 8:00-9:30 pm Location: Elliot Hall of Music -ELLT 116.

More information

Theme 2 - PHYSICS UNIT 2 Forces and Moments. A force is a push or a pull. This means that whenever we push or pull something, we are doing a force.

Theme 2 - PHYSICS UNIT 2 Forces and Moments. A force is a push or a pull. This means that whenever we push or pull something, we are doing a force. Forces A force is a push or a pull. This means that whenever we push or pull something, we are doing a force. Forces are measured in Newtons (N) after the great physicist Sir Isaac Newton. The instrument

More information

PHYSICS 025 FINAL EXAMINATION Friday, 2003 April 11

PHYSICS 025 FINAL EXAMINATION Friday, 2003 April 11 Print Name: Student No. A 1-10 A 11-20 A 21-30 B1 B2 B3 B4 C1 C2 C3 Total PHYSICS 025 FINAL EXAMINATION Friday, 2003 April 11 Time: 7:00 10:00 PM 1. This is a closed book test. You may use only a calculator,

More information

Chapter 15B - Fluids in Motion. A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University

Chapter 15B - Fluids in Motion. A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University Chapter 15B - Fluids in Motion A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University 007 Paul E. Tippens Fluid Motion The lower falls at Yellowstone National

More information

The Concept of Force. field forces d) The gravitational force of attraction between two objects. f) Force a bar magnet exerts on a piece of iron.

The Concept of Force. field forces d) The gravitational force of attraction between two objects. f) Force a bar magnet exerts on a piece of iron. Lecture 3 The Laws of Motion OUTLINE 5.1 The Concept of Force 5.2 Newton s First Law and Inertial Frames 5.3 Mass 5.4 Newton s Second Law 5.5 The Gravitational Force and Weight 5.6 Newton s Third Law 5.8

More information

Fluid flow Pressure Bernoulli Principle Surface Tension

Fluid flow Pressure Bernoulli Principle Surface Tension Lecture 9. Fluid flow Pressure Bernoulli Principle Surface Tension A v L A is the area Fluid flow Speed of a fluid in a pipe is not the same as the flow rate Relating: Fluid flow rate to Average speed

More information

P sat = A exp [B( 1/ /T)] B= 5308K. A=6.11 mbar=vapor press. 0C.

P sat = A exp [B( 1/ /T)] B= 5308K. A=6.11 mbar=vapor press. 0C. Lecture 5. Water and water vapor in the atmosphere 14 Feb 2008 Review of buoyancy, with an unusual demonstration of Archimedes principle. Water is a polar molecule that forms hydrogen bonds. Consequently

More information

A Physical Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. Study Guide and Practice Problems Spring 2017

A Physical Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. Study Guide and Practice Problems Spring 2017 A Physical Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Study Guide and Practice Problems Spring 2017 A Physical Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Study Guide and Practice Problems Spring 2017 by Alexander J. Smits

More information

Chapter 5: Gases. Definitions: Phases of Matter 10/27/2011

Chapter 5: Gases. Definitions: Phases of Matter 10/27/2011 Chapter 5: Gases 5.1 Definitions 5.2 The First Laws 5.3 The Ideal Gas Law 5.4 Stoichiometry and Gases 5.5 Mixtures of Gases (Partial Pressures) 5.6 Kinetic Molecular Theory 5.7 Effusion and Diffusion 5.8-9

More information