Please bring the task to your first physics lesson and hand it to the teacher.

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1 Pre-enrolment task for 2014 entry Physics Why do I need to complete a pre-enrolment task? This bridging pack serves a number of purposes. It gives you practice in some of the important skills you will need to master to be successful at AS level It gives you the opportunity to get your brain back into gear after a few weeks relaxing after your GCSEs It reminds you that to be successful at AS level you MUST complete work out of class It helps us to decide whether you have the skills and motivation to be successful at AS level and if there are any areas you need help with If you find there are parts of this pack that you cannot do don t panic. There are videos available to help you on the Huddersfield New College Physics Department Youtube channel. Go to Youtube.com/huddnewcollphysics and see the playlist called Bridging Course. If there are STILL parts you can t do STILL don t panic. E Mail When should I hand it in? Please bring the task to your first physics lesson and hand it to the teacher. How will I be given feedback on how well I have done? Your teacher will give you feedback at the end of the second teaching week.

2 Task In Detail Formulas in AS Physics The table below contains all the formulas that appear on the syllabus for Unit 1. There are two pieces of good news associated with this. Firstly there are only 18 of the blighters, not the dozens people would have you believe, and secondly, if you have trouble remembering them it won t matter because you get a data sheet with them all on. However, the bad news is that to get anywhere in physics you must know which formula to use when and what to do with it to get the answer you need. If you re lucky you ll only need to put numbers into the formula, but it s more likely you ll need to rearrange the formula to change the subject. * * * (It doesn t matter for now whether you know what all the formulas mean. You ll get to know them.) Before we learn the rules of rearranging formulas let s remind ourselves what an equation is. The equals sign tells us that whatever is on the left hand side has the same value as whatever is on the right hand side. If we change one side of the equation we must make the same change to the other side in order for them to remain equal. This is easy. The skill comes in deciding WHAT to do to each side! Equations that involve only adding or subtracting. The easiest equations are those that only involve addition or subtraction. The only equation like this in the table is Example the equation to find an expression for. Since the equation only involves addition or subtraction we only use addition or subtraction to rearrange it. The equation will still be true if we subtract the same thing from both sides. We could subtract anything we wanted, but the obvious thing to subtract from both sides is. So So. To tidy up we normally write the letter we are looking for on the left so Exercise 1 1. the equation E=V+v V 2. the equation 3. the equation. 4. the equation.

3 Equations that involve only multiplying and dividing Most of the equations in unit 1 involve only multiplying or dividing so we need to do lots of practice on this sort of equation. Some of the equations like this have been marked in the table with a *. Mark the remaining equations of this type in the table in the same way. If an equation involves only multiplying and dividing we must only use multiplying and dividing when we rearrange it. A lot of people get by at GCSE by learning formula triangles such as (To find the expression for A cover A up and what you can see is the answer, B x C. To find B, cover it up and what you can see is the answer, A/C.) If you have never come across this method don t worry. If you rely on this method it s time to learn more flexible ways of dealing with equations. Although physics teachers tend to sneer there s really nothing wrong with using this method provided you can make up the triangle when you need it by looking at a formula and you don t try to memorise loads of triangles. The big disadvantage is that the method only works for one form of equation. We d therefore be much better off getting our brains around the proper rules of algebra on these easy questions so we get good at it and can apply it to all sorts of harder formulas. In the table on the previous page draw a in every box which contains a formula which can be made into a formula triangle. (All of the equations which have a will also have a *.) In the space below draw formula triangles for three of the formulas in the table. A B x C And now some a few reminders about how we should really rearrange formulas that involve only multiplying or dividing. Example the equation y The equation involves only so we will rearrange it using multiplying or dividing only multiplying and dividing. but there s no point in doing double both sides... that. but there s no point in doing multiply both sides by 5... that. and there IS a point in doing divide both sides by 3... this because it gives us the expression for y on its own.

4 Example the equation The equation involves only multiplying or dividing double both sides... multiply both sides by 5... multiply both sides by 6... To tidy up we normally write the letter we are looking for on the left-hand side. x so we will rearrange it using only multiplying and dividing. but there s no point in doing that. but there s no point in doing that. and there IS a point in doing this because it gives us the expression for x on its own. Example the equation x. The equation involves only multiplying or dividing multiply both sides by the same number... the d s on the right hand side cancel out. To tidy up we normally write the letter we are looking for on the left-hand side. so we will rearrange it using only multiplying and dividing. so we choose to multiply by d because that will get us somewhere because Example the equation x. The equation involves only multiplying and dividing multiply both sides by the same number... the a s on the right hand side cancel out. We divide both sides by 5 so we will rearrange it using only multiplying and dividing. so we choose to multiply by a because to leave x on its own To tidy up we normally write the letter we are looking for on the left-hand side.

5 It s a bit more complicated if we need to find a term which starts out on the bottom, but we just need to apply the same rules patiently. Example the equation to find an expression for T. The equation involves only multiplying and dividing We don t want T to be on the bottom The T s on the left cancel so we will rearrange it using only multiplying and dividing. so we multiply both sides by T. We divide both sides by R The R s on the right cancel Final answer

6 Exercise 2 TASK write the rearranged formula in each box. Make sure you write it as an equation the first two have been started for you. 1 f V. W. I. 5 V. 6 for V. to give an expression 7 for t. to give an expression 8 for I. to give an expression R. A. c. I. Q. l. 15 λ.

7 Significant figures When we take measurements in an experiment or perform a calculation it is important to indicate how precisely the measurement has been made or how much confidence we have in the accuracy of the calculation. We do this by using an appropriate number of significant figures If we state that an object is 0.3 m long we mean it s closer to 0.3 than it is to 0.2 or 0.4 so it could have any length in the shaded zone. Both the arrows above the scale could be called 0.3 m long even though they are clearly very different lengths. If we only use 1 significant figure in our measurements we may be ignoring big differences and the measurement is very unreliable If we state that an object is 0.30 m long we mean that its length is closer to 0.30 m than it is to 0.29 m or 0.31 m. It s length is somewhere in the shaded zone. So both the arrows above the scale could be called 0.30 m long. If we use 2 significant figures in our measurements we may be ignoring slight differences, but the measurement is reasonably reliable If we state that an object is m long we mean it could have any length in the very small shaded zone. If we use 3 significant figures in our measurements the differences we overlook are very slight indeed like the differences between the two arrows in this diagram. The measurement is very reliable. As a general rule 1 significant figure is never enough 4 significant figures is too much 2 or 3 significant figures will be OK Most measurements you make in physics will be to 2 or 3 significant figures.

8 For numbers greater than 1 every digit is a significant figure. For numbers less than 1 the first significant figure is the first digit which is not zero. Every figure after that is significant, even if it s zero st sig fig 3 rd sig fig 2 nd sig fig If we use measurements in calculations we can t be any more certain about the answer than we were about the original data so we should not use more significant figures in the answer than there were in the data. TASK Write the following numbers to the number of significant figures stated. Do not convert to standard form. No of sig figs Use your calculator to perform the following calculations and give your answer to the number of significant figures stated. No of sig figs

9 Standard form You probably learned HOW to do standard form at GCSE. The trouble is a lot of people miss the point of WHY we use it, so just regard it as an unnecessary and more complicated way of writing numbers. They never get to appreciate the benefits. Let s have a look at some... Which of these numbers is bigger or ? And which of these? or You would need to spend ages carefully counting the digits to spot that the first number is larger in each case. There is also a high risk of making a mistake if we copy these numbers down. And they won t fit on your calculator screen. In reality it s unlikely we ever would come across meaningful numbers with so many digits. It s hard to imagine any situation where we could measure anything and confidently give its value to such a ridiculous degree of accuracy as in the first pair of numbers. These are just some of the reasons why it makes life easier for us if we use standard form. (Whatever you might think at first, once you get used to it is IS much easier than writing down great strings of digits!) Let s use a slightly shorter number as an example is the same as x 10 or x 10 x 10 = x 10 2 or x 10 x 10 x 10 = x 10 3 or x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 = x 10 4 or x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 = x x 10 5 (something point something times ten to the something) is known as standard form. We would probably round this off to 2.36 x 10 5 (See notes on significant figures if unsure.) To put a big number into standard form: Look for where the decimal point is, and if the number doesn t have one put one in at the end. Count how many places you need to move the decimal point to the left so that it ends up between the first and second digits. The number of places is the power of Decimal point needs to end up here The decimal point must be moved 7 places to the left in order for it to be between the first and second digit so the number is x (We discuss significant figures elsewhere.) Decimal point needs to end up here Decimal point starts here Although no decimal point is written we imagine it starting at the end of the number. It must be moved 7 places to the left in order for it to be between the first and second digit so the number is x10 7. (We discuss significant figures elsewhere.)

10 For small numbers which begin with 0. count how many places you must move the decimal point to the right so that it comes after the first digit which is not zero. This number is the negative power of ten. Note that it is always one more than the number of zeroes after the decimal point There are 5 zeroes after the decimal point. The decimal point must be moved 6 places to the right to come after the first non-zero digit so the number in standard form is

11 TASK 1. Write the following numbers in standard form, giving the answers to three significant figures. a b c 324 d e Write the following numbers in standard form, giving the answers to three significant figures. a b c d Put the following numbers in ascending order by writing the numbers 1,2,3,4,5 in the box above the appropriate number And now do the same with these: 4.63 x x x x x 10 3 You should have found it much easier to put the standard form numbers in order than the ordinary numbers. Stick with it standard form makes life easy! When NOT to use standard form We use standard form to make our life easy. Since 2.2 x 10 1 is NOT easier to interpret than 22, we wouldn t normally bother with standard form for numbers between 1 and Similarly 1.5 x 10-1 is NOT easier to interpret than 0.15 so we wouldn t normally bother with standard form for numbers between 0.01 and 1.

12 Tables and graphs This activity is about an experiment carried out to investigate how the current (I) through a fixed resistor depends on the voltage (V) across it. (In unit 1 you will learn that a more correct term for voltage is potential difference, but the name voltage will do for now.) The activity tests your basic skills in finding averages, plotting graphs and finding gradients. The circuit used is shown in the diagram below. TASK Complete the diagram by adding a V and an A in the appropriate circles to show the symbols for an ammeter and a voltmeter correctly connected. R The experiment was performed a total of three times. The following table shows the results obtained in the experiment. TASK Calculate the three missing values for average current I and complete the table. Pay careful attention to significant figures and rounding. V/V I /A (1 st time) I /A (2 nd time) I /A (3 rd time) I /A (Average)

13 The graph of voltage (y axis) against average current (x axis) has been started for you. TASK Label the axes correctly to show both the quantity plotted (ie current or voltage) and the unit in which the quantity is measured. The three points from your table for which you calculated the average current are missing. TASK Plot these points as accurately as you can TASK Draw a line of best fit on your graph. (See the video if you are unsure how to do this.)

14 TASK Calculate the gradient of your graph. Draw two sides of a triangle on your graph to show how you obtain the values used in your calculation. Show your working out. (See the video if you are unsure how to do this.) The gradient of your graph should be equal to the resistance of the resistor used in the circuit. What value resistance was used (including units)? Rate your confidence How confident do you now feel about your ability to tackle the topics covered in this bridging pack? Give yourself a score out of 10 for each topic (1 = I m not very confident, 10 = I don t think I ll have any problems) Topic Rearranging formulae Standard form Significant figures Tables, graphs and gradients Confidence