EE 330 Lecture 22. Small Signal Modelling Operating Points for Amplifier Applications Amplification with Transistor Circuits

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "EE 330 Lecture 22. Small Signal Modelling Operating Points for Amplifier Applications Amplification with Transistor Circuits"

Transcription

1 EE 330 Lecture 22 Small Signal Modelling Operating Points for Amplifier Applications Amplification with Transistor Circuits

2 Exam 2 Friday March 9 Exam 3 Friday April 13 Review Session for Exam 2: 6:00 p.m. on Thursday March 8 in Room Sweeney 1116

3 Review from Last Lecture B C E E C vertical npn B A-A Section B C E C B E lateral pnp C B E B C E B-B Section

4 Review from Last Lecture G D S A-A SSectionD p-channel JFET G B-B Section

5 Review from Last Lecture The vertical npn transistor Emitter area only geometric parameter that appears in basic device model Transistor much larger than emitter Multiple-emitter devices often used (TTL Logic) and don t significantly increase area

6 Review from Last Lecture A challenge in modeling the BJT In contrast to the MOSFET where process parameters are independent of geometry, the bipolar transistor model is for a specific transistor! Area emitter factor is used to model other devices Often multiple specific device models are given and these devices are used directly Often designer can not arbitrarily set A E but rather must use parallel combinations of specific devices and layouts

7 Small-Signal Models MOSFET BJT Diode (of limited use)

8 Modeling of the MOSFET Goal: Obtain a mathematical relationship between the port variables of a device. I f V,V,V I I D G B 1 f f 2 3 GS DS BS VGS,VDS,VBS V GS,VDS,VBS Drain V DS I D I B Gate Bulk I D Simple dc Model V GS V BS Small Signal Better Analytical dc Model Sophisticated Model for Computer Simulations Frequency Dependent Small Signal Simpler dc Model

9 Small-Signal Operation Output Range Q Q-point Input Range Q Throughout the small input range, the distant nonlinearities do not affect performance

10 Small-Signal Operation Output Range Q Q-point Input Range Q If slope is steep, output range can be much larger than input range The slope can be viewed as the voltage gain of the circuit Nonlinear circuit behaves as a linear circuit near Q-point with small-signal inputs

11 Small signal operation of nonlinear circuits =Q +V M sinωt Nonlinear Circuit =? V M is small VM t -VM Small signal concepts often apply when building amplifiers If small signal concepts do not apply, usually the amplifier will not perform well Small signal operation is usually synonymous with locally linear Small signal operation is relative to an operating point

12 Operating Point of Electronic Circuits Often interested in circuits where a small signal input is to be amplified The electrical port variables where the small signal goes to 0 is termed the fixed point, the equilibrium point, the Quiescent Point, the Operating Point, the Bias Point, or simply the Q-Point By setting the small signal to 0, it means replacing small voltage inputs with short circuits and small current inputs with open circuits When analyzing small-signal amplifiers, it is necessary to obtain the Q-point When designing small-signal amplifiers, establishing of the desired Q-point is termed biasing Capacitors become open circuits (and inductors short circuits) when determining Q-points Simplified dc models of the MOSFET (saturation region) or BJT (forward active region) are usually adequate for determining the Q-point in practical amplifier circuits DC voltage and current sources remain when determining Q-points Small-signal voltage and current sources are set to 0 when determining Q-points

13 Operating Point of Electronic Circuits R 2 4V V in R 1 V DD V out R 1 (t) 200K 4K V DD =8V C 2 V SS (t) A E =100μ 2 V CQ =? 4K -2V 2K C 1 C 2 V(t)=V Msin(ωt+θ) R 1 R 2 V DD V DD =8V 8V 3V V(t)=VMsin(ωt+θ) R 3 R 1 M 1 C 1 R 4 30K 6K V SQ =? C 2 4K R 2 C 2 V SS 200K 60K

14 Operating Point Analysis of MOS and Bipolar Devices Example: Determine Q and V CQ V DD =9V 50K 1K C 1 C 2 4K V(t)=V M sin(ωt+θ) 25K 1K C 3 Will formally go through the process in this example, will go into more detail about finding the operating point later

15 Operating Point Analysis of MOS and Bipolar Devices Example: Determine Q and V CQ V DD =9V 50K 1K V DD =9V 4K 50K 1K V CQ Q 25K 1K B 0.6V I B βi B C 4K E C B I B C 25K 1K B 0.6V βi B E E

16 Operating Point Analysis of MOS and Bipolar Devices Example: Determine Q and V CQ V DD =9V Assume β=100 Assume I B <<I 1 (must verify) 50K I 1 B 0.6V I B 1K βi B V CQ C I RL R L 4K Q V BQ 9V 3V 3 V 3V 0.6V 2.4V EQ 2.4V I EQ ICQ 2.4mA 1K V 9V I 1K 9V 2.4V 6.6V CQ CQ E V I 4K 0V OUTQ RL 25K 1K V CQ =6.6V Q =0V

17 Amplification with Transistors From Wikipedia: (approx. 2010) Generally, an amplifier or simply amp, is any device that changes, usually increases, the amplitude of a signal. The "signal" is usually voltage or current. From Wikipedia: (Oct. 2015) An amplifier, electronic amplifier or (informally) amp is an electronic device that increases the power of a signal. From Wikipedia: (Feb. 2017) An amplifier, electronic amplifier or (informally) amp is an electronic device that increases the power of a signal (a time varying voltage or current. What is the power of a signal? Does Wikipedia have such a basic concept right?

18 Signal and Power Levels R S R S RL R L R 1 R 2 R S P RL <P VIN R L <

19 Signal and Power Levels R S R 1 R 2 R S R L R L R S R 1 R 2 R L P RL <P VIN <

20 Amplification with Transistors From Wikipedia: (Feb. 2017) An amplifier, electronic amplifier or (informally) amp is an electronic device that increases the power of a signal (a time varying voltage or current. It is difficult to increase the voltage or current very much with passive RC circuits Voltage and current levels can be increased a lot with transformers but not practical in integrated circuits Power levels can not be increased with passive elements (R, L, C, and Transformers) Often an amplifier is defined to be a circuit that can increase power levels (be careful with Wikipedia and WWW even when some of the most basic concepts are discussed) Transistors can be used to increase not only signal levels but power levels to a load In transistor circuits, power that is delivered in the signal path is supplied by a biasing network Signals that are amplified are often not time varying

21 Amplification with Transistors VIN + - Amplifier RL + - VOUT Usually the gain of an amplifier is larger than 1 V OUT = A VVIN Often the power dissipated by R L is larger than the power supplied by An amplifier can be thought of as a dependent source that was discussed in EE 201 Input and output variables can be either V or I or mixed

22 Applications of Devices as Amplifiers I C, I D Logic Circuits Linear Circuits C Logic Circuits Typical Regions of Operation by Circuit Function MOS Bipolar Triode and Cutoff Saturation and Cutoff V CE,V DS Linear Circuits Saturation Forward Active

23 Consider the following MOSFET and BJT Circuits BJT MOSFET V CC R V DD R 1 Q 1 M 1 (t) (t) V EE V SS Assume BJT operating in FA region, MOSFET operating in Saturation Assume same quiescent output voltage and same resistor R 1 Note architecture is same for BJT and MOSFET circuits One of the most widely used amplifier architectures

24 Consider the following MOSFET and BJT Circuits BJT V CC R 1 MOSFET V DD R 1 (t) Q 1 (t) M 1 V EE V SS MOS and BJT Architectures often Identical Circuit are Highly Nonlinear Nonlinear Analysis Methods Must be used to analyze these and almost any other nonlinear circuit

25 Methods of Analysis of Nonlinear Circuits KCL and KVL apply to both linear and nonlinear circuits Superposition, voltage divider and current divider equations, Thevenin and Norton equivalence apply only to linear circuits! Some other analysis techniques that have been developed may apply only to linear circuits as well

26 Methods of Analysis of Nonlinear Circuits Will consider three different analysis requirements and techniques for some particularly common classes of nonlinear circuits 1. Circuits with continuously differential devices Interested in obtaining transfer characteristics of these circuits or outputs for given input signals 2. Circuits with piecewise continuous devices Interested in obtaining transfer characteristics of these circuits or outputs for a given input signals 3. Circuits with small-signal inputs that vary around some operating point Interested in obtaining relationship between small-signal inputs and the corresponding small-signal outputs. Will assume these circuits operate linearly in some suitably small region around the operating point Other types of nonlinearities may exist and other types of analysis may be required but we will not attempt to categorize these scenarios in this course

27 1. Nonlinear circuits with continuously differential devices Analysis Strategy: Use KVL and KCL for analysis Represent nonlinear models for devices either mathematically or graphically Solve the resultant set of nonlinear and linear equations for the variables of interest

28 2. Circuits with piecewise continuous devices e.g. f x Analysis Strategy: f x x x 1 1 f x x x 2 1 Guess region of operation region 1 region 2 Solve resultant circuit using the previous method Verify region of operation is valid Repeat the previous 3 steps as often as necessary until region of operation is verified It helps to guess right the first time but a wrong guess will not result in an incorrect solution because a wrong guess can not be verified Piecewise models generally result in a simplification of the analysis of nonlinear circuits

29 Determine boundary of region where small signal analysis is valid 3. Circuits with small-signal inputs that vary around some operating point Interested in obtaining relationship between small-signal inputs and the corresponding small-signal outputs. Will assume these circuits operate linearly in some suitably small region around the operating point Analysis Strategy: Use methods from previous class of nonlinear circuits More Practical Analysis Strategy: Determine the operating point (using method 1 or 2 discussed above after all small signal independent inputs are set to 0) Develop small signal (linear) model for all devices in the region of interest (around the operating point or Q-point ) Create small signal equivalent circuit by replacing all devices with small-signal equivalent Solve the resultant small-signal (linear) circuit Can use KCL, DVL, and other linear analysis tools such as superposition, voltage and current divider equations, Thevenin and Norton equivalence

30 Small signal operation of nonlinear circuits =Q +V M sinωt Nonlinear Circuit V M is small If V M is sufficiently small, then any nonlinear circuit operating at a region where there are no abrupt nonlinearities will have a nearly sinusoidal output and the variance of the magnitude of this output with V M will be nearly linear (could be viewed as locally linear ) This is termed the small signal operation of the nonlinear circuit When operating with small signals, the nonlinear circuit performs linearly with respect to these small signals thus other properties of linear networks such as superposition apply provided the sum of all superimposed signals remains sufficiently small Other types of small signals, e.g. square waves, triangular waves, or even arbitrary waveforms often are used as inputs as well but the performance of the nonlinear network also behaves linearly for these inputs Many useful electronic systems require the processing of these small signals Practical methods of analyzing and designing circuits that operate with small signal inputs are really important

31 Small signal operation of nonlinear circuits =Q +V M sinωt Nonlinear Circuit V M is small Practical methods of analyzing and designing circuits that operate with small signal inputs are really important Two key questions: How small must the input signals be to obtain locally-linear operation of a nonlinear circuit? How can these locally-linear (alt small signal) circuits be analyzed and designed?

32 Consider the following MOSFET and BJT Circuits BJT V CC R 1 MOSFET V DD R 1 (t) Q 1 (t) M 1 V EE V SS One of the most widely used amplifier architectures

33 Small signal operation of nonlinear circuits =Q +V M sinωt Nonlinear Circuit V M is small Example of circuit that is widely used in locally-linear mode of operation R V DD VM t -VM M 1 Two methods of analyzing locally-linear circuits will be considered, one of these is by far the most practical V SS

34 Small signal operation of nonlinear circuits =Q +V M sinωt Nonlinear Circuit V M is small Two methods of analyzing locally-linear circuits for small-signal excitaions will be considered, one of these is by far the most practical 1. Analysis using nonlinear models 2. Small signal analysis using locally-linearized models

35 Small signal analysis using nonlinear models R V DD By selecting appropriate value of V SS, M 1 will operate in the saturation region Assume M 1 operating in saturation region V M t M 1 -V M V SS =Q +V M sinωt V M is small Termed Load Line V =V -I R OUT DD D μc W OX I V -V -V 2 D IN SS T 2L μc W I V -V -V 2L μc W OX V V V -V -V 2 R OUT DD IN SS T 2L μc W 2 OX V V V sint +[V -V -V ] OUT DD M INQ SS T R 2L 2 OX DQ INQ SS T

36 Small signal analysis example R =Q +V M sinωt V M is small V DD M 1 V SS μc W 2 OX V V V sint +[V -V -V ] OUT DD M INQ SS T R 2L 2 μc W 2 V sint OX M V V [V -V -V ] OUT DD INQ SS T 1+ R 2L V -V -V INQ SS T Recall from calculus: μc W 2 2V sint OX M V V [V -V -V ] 1+ R OUT DD INQ SS T 2L V -V -V INQ SS T μc W 2 μc W 2 2V sint OX OX M V V V -V -V R OUT DD INQ SS T V -V -V INQ SS T R 2L 2L V -V -V INQ SS T μc W 2 μc W OX OX V V V -V -V R V -V -V RV sint OUT DD INQ SS T INQ SS T M 2L L

37 Small signal analysis example V DD R By selecting appropriate value of V SS, M 1 will operate in the saturation region =Q +V M sinωt M 1 Assume M 1 operating in saturation region V SS μc W 2 μc W OX OX V V V -V -V R V -V -V RV sint OUT DD INQ SS T INQ SS T M 2L L

38 Small signal analysis example R V DD Assume M 1 operating in saturation region =Q +V M sinωt M 1 V SS μc W 2 μc W OX OX V V V -V -V R V -V -V RV sint OUT DD INQ SS T INQ SS T M 2L L Quiescent Output μc W OX V V V -V -V 2 R OUTQ DD INQ SS T 2L OUT OUTQ V M ss Voltage Gain V Q OX V V A V sin t V V A (V V ) OUT OUTQ INQ μc W L Note the ss voltage gain is negative since V SS +V T <0! A INQ SS T V -V -V R

39 Small signal analysis example R V DD Assume M 1 operating in saturation region =Q +V M sinωt M 1 V SS V V A V sin t OUT OUTQ V M μc W OX V V V -V -V 2 R OUTQ DD INQ SS T 2L A μc W L V OX But this expression gives little insight into how large the gain is! And the analysis for even this very simple circuit was messy! INQ SS T V -V -V R

40 Small signal analysis example R V DD V V A V sin t OUT OUTQ V M =Q +V M sinωt M 1 VM t -VM V SS V DD V OQ V M =0 t V SS

41 Small signal analysis example R V DD V DD VM -VM V V A V sin t OUT OUTQ V M =Q +V M sinωt OX AV INQ SS T M 1 V SS t μc W L V -V -V R V OQ V M t V SS

42 V DD Small signal analysis example R V DD VM -VM V V A V sin t OUT OUTQ V M =Q +V M sinωt OX AV INQ SS T M 1 V SS t μc W L V -V -V R V OQ V M t V SS

43 Small signal analysis example R V DD M 1 VM -VM V V A V sin t OUT OUTQ V M t μc W L =Q +V M sinωt OX AV INQ SS T V -V -V R V SS V DD V OQ V M t V SS Serious Distortion occurs if signal is too large or Q-point non-optimal Here clipping occurs for high

44 Small signal analysis example R V DD M 1 V SS VM -VM V DD V V A V sin t OUT OUTQ V M t μc W L =Q +V M sinωt OX AV INQ SS T V -V -V R V OQ V M t V SS Serious Distortion occurs if signal is too large or Q-point non-optimal Here clipping occurs for low

45 End of Lecture 22