Chapter 5 Review. 1) Our Earth is about four times larger than the Moon in diameter. 1)

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Chapter 5 Review. 1) Our Earth is about four times larger than the Moon in diameter. 1)"

Transcription

1 Chapter 5 Review Name TRUE/FALSE. Write 'T' if the statement is true and 'F' if the statement is false. 1) Our Earth is about four times larger than the Moon in diameter. 1) 2) The Earth's hotter, inner core is liquid and its cooler, outer core is solid. 2) 3) Neap tides occur at first and third quarter phases of the Moon. 3) 4) Weather occurs in the troposphere. 4) 5) The three most abundant gases in our atmosphere are nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. 5) 6) Seismic P-waves can travel through both solid and liquid materials. 6) 7) Seismic S-waves can travel through Earth's liquid outer core. 7) 8) Most lunar craters are volcanic in origin. 8) 9) The crust on the near side of the Moon is on average thinner than the crust on the far side, due to our tidal pull on the Moon. 9) MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 10) Which of the following layers of the Earth is unique among the terrestrial planets? 10) A) core B) hydrosphere C) mantle D) ionosphere E) crust 11) What is true of spring tides? 11) A) The difference between low and high tides would be greatest. B) There would be one high and one low tide each day. C) The third quarter moon would be high overhead at dawn. D) The difference between low and high tides would be smallest. E) The Moon's phase will be first quarter. 12) At what phase are the tides least noticeable? 12) A) full moon B) waning gibbous C) third quarter D) new moon E) waxing crescent 1

2 13) What is true of the Moon's orbital and rotational periods? 13) A) They are equal. B) The orbital period is greatest at full moon. C) The rotational period is longer. D) The orbital period is longer. E) The rotational period varies with the Moon's phase. 14) In what part of our atmosphere do we live? 14) A) troposphere B) stratosphere C) ionosphere D) exosphere E) mesosphere 15) Which of these gases is least abundant in our atmosphere? 15) A) argon B) oxygen C) carbon dioxide D) nitrogen E) hydrogen 16) What is the average molecular speed of hydrogen (mass = 1) on Earth (temperature = 300 K)? 16) A) 2.72 km/s B) 2.72 m/s C) 4.71 m/s D) 4.71 km/s E) None of the above 17) We determine the structure of the Earth's core using 17) A) magnetic resonance imaging. B) radar and sonar. C) deep mine shafts. D) seismic wave data. E) satellite imaging. 18) The atmospheric gases primarily responsible for our greenhouse effect are 18) A) water vapor and carbon dioxide. B) oxygen and carbon dioxide. C) argon and water vapor. D) carbon monoxide and methane. E) hydrogen and helium. 19) In noting that the Earth is "differentiated," we mean that 19) A) the Earth is very different than any other planet we study. B) the density increases as you descend downward toward the core. C) the radioactive heating in the core is increasing with time. D) the Earth's magnetic field varies at different locations on the globe. E) the density of oceanic basalt is less than that of granite on the mountain tops. 2

3 20) Which statement about seismic waves is true? 20) A) P waves travel faster, and thus arrive sooner than do the S waves. B) Only S waves can travel through liquid. C) In the shadow zones, neither type is observed. D) S waves can travel though the outer core, but P waves cannot. E) On the far side of the Earth, only the S waves on the surface can be detected. 21) Which of these is not a result of plate tectonics? 21) A) the Grand Canyon B) the San Andreas Fault C) the Mid-Atlantic Rift D) the Andes E) the Philippine Trench 22) When strong solar winds are displaced poleward by our magnetic fields, we get 22) A) hurricanes in the tropics. B) intense auroral displays. C) sunspots. D) the Van Allen radiation belts. E) droughts and dust bowls in the American West. 23) The region in which charged particles are trapped by our magnetic fields is the 23) A) ionosphere. B) ozone layers. C) Van Allen radiation belt. D) exosphere. E) Aurora. 24) Which of these theories seems to best explain the Moon's origin? 24) A) Capture Theory B) Fusion Theory C) Impact Theory D) Coformation Theory E) Fission Theory SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. 25) The Sun reinforces the Moon's tidal pull during tides. 25) 26) The ozone layer blocks much of the Sun's radiation. 26) 27) The oxygen in our atmosphere is produced by. 27) 28) The water that has been detected on the Moon lies at its. 28) 29) Our molten core is believed to consist primarily of the element. 29) 30) is responsible for heating the Earth's interior today. 30) 3

4 31) The dominant dark features on the near side of the Moon are the. 31) 32) The Moon's composition is similar to Earth's. 32) ESSAY. Write your answer in the space provided or on a separate sheet of paper. 33) List the six main regions of the Earth, in order, starting from the center. 34) Why does the Moon lack an atmosphere? 35) What were the two primary courses of heating that let the Earth differentiate? 36) Where is the newest material in the Earth's crust found? 37) Note at least three surface features that are driven by plate tectonics. 38) Explain how crater counts allow us to estimate the ages of surfaces throughout the solar system. 39) Relate our magnetic field to the aurorae. 40) Why is the impact theory now preferred as an explanation for the Moon's origin? 4

5 Answer Key Testname: CH 5 REVIEW 1) TRUE 2) FALSE 3) TRUE 4) TRUE 5) TRUE 6) TRUE 7) FALSE 8) FALSE 9) TRUE 10) B 11) A 12) C 13) A 14) A 15) E 16) A 17) D 18) A 19) B 20) A 21) A 22) B 23) C 24) C 25) spring 26) ultraviolet 27) life processes 28) poles 29) iron 30) Radioactive decay 31) mare 32) mantle. 33) core, mantle, crust, hydrosphere, atmosphere, magnetosphere 34) Its atmosphere escaped into space due to the low surface gravity of the Moon. 35) Impacts of interplanetary debris and radioactive decay. 36) At the mid-ocean ridges, where plate tectonics constantly extrudes new lava. 37) Rift valleys, trenches, mountain ranges, volcanic chains, faults, midocean ridges 38) Craters are the rule everybody was a target in the early days of accretion. The longer the surface has sat without internal deformation, the more impacts have cratered the surface. If craters are absent, it is because other processes, such as lava flows or erosion, have replaced the older cratering. 39) The magnetic field's Van Allen radiation belts deflect the charged particles away from our equator toward the poles, where the charged particles spiral down the magnetic field lines and hit the ionosphere to create the colorful ionized patterns. 40) The capture theory is unlikely for a body as big as the Moon, while the coformation theory would have the Moon orbit our equator as it condensed. The impacting body would be of different composition than the Earth, and the heat of impact would drive off the lighter materials, as noted for the Moon's crust. The body would also have been moving in the ecliptic plane before impact, and the Moon still orbits close to the ecliptic even now. 5

Earth. Interior Crust Hydrosphere Atmosphere Magnetosphere Tides

Earth. Interior Crust Hydrosphere Atmosphere Magnetosphere Tides Earth Interior Crust Hydrosphere Atmosphere Magnetosphere Tides Semi-major Axis 1 A.U. Inclination 0 Orbital period 1.000 tropical year Orbital eccentricity 0.017 Rotational period 23 h 56 min 4.1 s Tilt

More information

The Earth. Overall Structure of Earth

The Earth. Overall Structure of Earth The Earth Why Study The Earth??? It s our home! Where did life come from, where is it going. To understand the other planets. Study of other planets will, in turn, help us understand the Earth. Overall

More information

Earth as Planet. Earth s s Magnetic Field. The Earth s s Crust. Earth s s Interior

Earth as Planet. Earth s s Magnetic Field. The Earth s s Crust. Earth s s Interior Earth as Planet Earth s s Interior The Earth is a medium size planet with a diameter of 12,756 kilometers (7926 miles) Composed primarily of iron, silicon, and oxygen Nearly circular orbit and just the

More information

Important information from Chapter 1

Important information from Chapter 1 Important information from Chapter 1 Distinguish between: Natural hazard // Disaster // Catastrophe What role does human population play in these categories? Know how to read a Hazard Map, such as Figure

More information

LESSON 2 THE EARTH-SUN-MOON SYSTEM. Chapter 8 Astronomy

LESSON 2 THE EARTH-SUN-MOON SYSTEM. Chapter 8 Astronomy LESSON 2 THE EARTH-SUN-MOON SYSTEM Chapter 8 Astronomy OBJECTIVES Investigate how the interaction of Earth, the Moon, and the Sun causes lunar phases. Describe conditions that produce lunar and solar eclipses.

More information

9. Moon, Mercury, Venus

9. Moon, Mercury, Venus 9. Moon, Mercury, Venus All the heavier elements were manufactured by stars later, either by thermonuclear fusion reactions deep in their interiors or by the violent explosions that mark the end of massive

More information

Chapter 17. Chapter 17

Chapter 17. Chapter 17 Chapter 17 Moons and Other Solar System Objects Sections 17.1-17.2 Chapter 17 Parallax http://www.youtube.com/watc h?v=xuqaildqpww The Moon July 20, 1969 humans first landed on moon What was the first

More information

EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE. 1. The graph below shows the average concentration of ozone in Earth's atmosphere over Arizona during 4 months of the year.

EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE. 1. The graph below shows the average concentration of ozone in Earth's atmosphere over Arizona during 4 months of the year. EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE 1. The graph below shows the average concentration of ozone in Earth's atmosphere over Arizona during 4 months of the year. Which layer of Earth's atmosphere contains the greatest concentration

More information

Inner Planets (Part II)

Inner Planets (Part II) Inner Planets (Part II) Sept. 18, 2002 1) Atmospheres 2) Greenhouse Effect 3) Mercury 4) Venus 5) Mars 6) Moon Announcements Due to technical difficulties, Monday s quiz doesn t count An extra credit problem

More information

Astronomy Ch. 11 Jupiter. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Astronomy Ch. 11 Jupiter. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Period: Date: Astronomy Ch. 11 Jupiter MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) Jupiter is noticeably oblate because: A) it has a

More information

Earth! Objectives: Interior and plate tectonics Atmosphere and greenhouse effect

Earth! Objectives: Interior and plate tectonics Atmosphere and greenhouse effect Earth! Objectives: Interior and plate tectonics Atmosphere and greenhouse effect Earth Fun Facts 1. Only body with liquid water on the surface. 2. Most massive terrestrial body in solar system 3. Only

More information

1. In the diagram below, letters A and B represent locations near the edge of a continent.

1. In the diagram below, letters A and B represent locations near the edge of a continent. 1. In the diagram below, letters A and B represent locations near the edge of a continent. A geologist who compares nonsedimentary rock samples from locations A and B would probably find that the samples

More information

LIGO sees binary neutron star merger on August 17, 2017

LIGO sees binary neutron star merger on August 17, 2017 LIGO sees binary neutron star merger on August 17, 2017 Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Multi-Messenger Astronomy This

More information

Chapter 11 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Jovian Planet Systems Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 11 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Jovian Planet Systems Pearson Education, Inc. Review Clickers The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Jovian Planet Systems If Jupiter was the size of a basketball, Earth would be the size of a(n) a) bacterium. b) grain of rice. c) marble. d) orange.

More information

ASTRO 120 Sample Exam

ASTRO 120 Sample Exam ASTRO 120 Sample Exam 1) If a planet has a reasonably strong magnetic field, we know that a. It is made entirely of iron b. There is liquid nitrogen below the surface c. It can harbor life d. It has a

More information

Shape and Size of the Earth

Shape and Size of the Earth Planet Earth Shape and Size of the Earth Gravity is what gives Earth its spherical shape Only effective if the body is of a critical size Critical radius is about 350 km Shape and Size of the Earth Earth

More information

D) outer core B) 1300 C A) rigid mantle A) 2000 C B) density, temperature, and pressure increase D) stiffer mantle C) outer core

D) outer core B) 1300 C A) rigid mantle A) 2000 C B) density, temperature, and pressure increase D) stiffer mantle C) outer core 1. In which area of Earth's interior is the pressure most likely to be 2.5 million atmospheres? A) asthenosphere B) stiffer mantle C) inner core D) outer core Base your answers to questions 2 and 3 on

More information

Section 2: The Atmosphere

Section 2: The Atmosphere Section 2: The Atmosphere Preview Classroom Catalyst Objectives The Atmosphere Composition of the Atmosphere Air Pressure Layers of the Atmosphere The Troposphere Section 2: The Atmosphere Preview, continued

More information

Plate Tectonics. Chapter 5

Plate Tectonics. Chapter 5 Plate Tectonics Chapter 5 Earth s Interior Scientists learn about the interior of Earth in 2 ways Direct Method Rock Samples Drilling Caves Earth s Interior Indirect Method Seismic Waves Speed of waves

More information

ESC102. Earth in Context

ESC102. Earth in Context ESC102 Earth in Context Scientific Method The scientific method is an orderly and logical approach that relies on data to inform our understanding of a problem or process. assumes that nature is consistent

More information

Contents of the Solar System

Contents of the Solar System The Solar System Contents of the Solar System Sun Planets 9 known (now: 8) Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars ( Terrestrials ) Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune ( Jovians ) Pluto (a Kuiper Belt object?) Natural

More information

Earth Data. Guiding Questions. The Earth. Minerals. Telling Rocks Apart. How geologists tell apart different minerals and rocks. Characteristics.

Earth Data. Guiding Questions. The Earth. Minerals. Telling Rocks Apart. How geologists tell apart different minerals and rocks. Characteristics. The Earth 1 Guiding Questions 1. What is the greenhouse effect? How does it affect the average temperature of the Earth? 2. Is the Earth completely solid inside? How can scientists tell? 3. How is it possible

More information

The History of the Earth

The History of the Earth The History of the Earth We have talked about how the universe and sun formed, but what about the planets and moons? Review: Origin of the Universe The universe began about 13.7 billion years ago The Big

More information

ASTR 1050: Survey of Astronomy Fall 2012 PRACTICE Exam #2 Instructor: Michael Brotherton Covers Solar System and Exoplanet Topics

ASTR 1050: Survey of Astronomy Fall 2012 PRACTICE Exam #2 Instructor: Michael Brotherton Covers Solar System and Exoplanet Topics ASTR 1050: Survey of Astronomy Fall 2012 PRACTICE Exam #2 Instructor: Michael Brotherton Covers Solar System and Exoplanet Topics Instructions This exam is closed book and closed notes, although you may

More information

Unit 3 Lesson 4 The Terrestrial Planets. Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 3 Lesson 4 The Terrestrial Planets. Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company Florida Benchmarks SC.8.N.1.5 Analyze the methods used to develop a scientific explanation as seen in different fields of science. SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets

More information

Astronomy. physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am. Page 1

Astronomy.  physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am. Page 1 Astronomy A. Dayle Hancock adhancock@wm.edu Small 239 Office hours: MTWR 10-11am Planetology I Terrestrial and Jovian planets Similarities/differences between planetary satellites Surface and atmosphere

More information

Planets Inner vs. outer Composition inner planets are rocky/outer are gas Size inner are smaller/outer are much larger Distance from sun inner are

Planets Inner vs. outer Composition inner planets are rocky/outer are gas Size inner are smaller/outer are much larger Distance from sun inner are Planets Inner vs. outer Composition inner planets are rocky/outer are gas Size inner are smaller/outer are much larger Distance from sun inner are close/outer are farther. Earth is 1 AU from the sun Life

More information

The Moon & Mercury: Dead Worlds

The Moon & Mercury: Dead Worlds The Moon & Mercury: Dead Worlds There are many similarities between the Moon and Mercury, and some major differences we ll concentrate mostly on the Moon. Appearance of the Moon from the Earth We ve already

More information

The Planets, Asteroids, Moons, etc.

The Planets, Asteroids, Moons, etc. DATE DUE: Ms. Terry J. Boroughs Geology 305 Name: Section: The Planets, Asteroids, Moons, etc. Instructions: Read each question carefully before selecting the BEST answer or option. Use GEOLOGIC vocabulary

More information

Edmonds Community College Astronomy 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Exam # 2

Edmonds Community College Astronomy 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Exam # 2 Edmonds Community College Astronomy 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Exam # 2 Instructor: L. M. Khandro 1. Relatively speaking, objects with high temperatures emit their peak radiation in short wavelengths

More information

Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems

Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems 11.1 A Different Kind of Planet Our goals for learning: Are jovian planets all alike? What are jovian planets like on the inside? What is the weather like on jovian planets?

More information

1 Characteristics of the Atmosphere

1 Characteristics of the Atmosphere CHAPTER 15 1 Characteristics of the Atmosphere SECTION The Atmosphere BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is Earth s atmosphere made of? How

More information

The Moon. Tides. Tides. Mass = 7.4 x 1025 g = MEarth. = 0.27 REarth. (Earth 5.5 g/cm3) Gravity = 1/6 that of Earth

The Moon. Tides. Tides. Mass = 7.4 x 1025 g = MEarth. = 0.27 REarth. (Earth 5.5 g/cm3) Gravity = 1/6 that of Earth The Moon Mass = 7.4 x 1025 g = 0.012 MEarth Radius = 1738 km = 0.27 REarth Density = 3.3 g/cm3 (Earth 5.5 g/cm3) Gravity = 1/6 that of Earth Dark side of the moon We always see the same face of the Moon.

More information

DeAnza College Fall 2017 Third Midterm Exam. 1. Use only a #2 pencil on your Parscore sheet, and fill in the bubbles darkly and completely.

DeAnza College Fall 2017 Third Midterm Exam. 1. Use only a #2 pencil on your Parscore sheet, and fill in the bubbles darkly and completely. FAMILY NAME : (Please PRINT!) GIVEN NAME : (Please PRINT!) Signature: ASTRONOMY 4 DeAnza College Fall 2017 Third Midterm Exam Instructions: 1. Use only a #2 pencil on your Parscore sheet, and fill in the

More information

The Cosmic Perspective Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds

The Cosmic Perspective Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Chapter 10 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds 10.1 Atmospheric Basics

More information

Lecture #11: Plan. Terrestrial Planets (cont d) Jovian Planets

Lecture #11: Plan. Terrestrial Planets (cont d) Jovian Planets Lecture #11: Plan Terrestrial Planets (cont d) Jovian Planets Mercury (review) Density = 5.4 kg / liter.. ~ Earth s Rocky mantle + iron/nickel core Slow spin: 59 days (orbital period = 88 days) No satellites

More information

Guiding Questions. The Earth. Minerals. Telling Rocks Apart. How geologists tell apart different minerals and rocks. Characteristics.

Guiding Questions. The Earth. Minerals. Telling Rocks Apart. How geologists tell apart different minerals and rocks. Characteristics. The Earth Guiding Questions 1. What is the greenhouse effect? How does it affect the average temperature of the Earth? 2. Is the Earth completely solid inside? How can scientists tell? 3. How is it possible

More information

3. The moon with the most substantial atmosphere in the Solar System is A) Iapetus B) Io C) Titan D) Triton E) Europa

3. The moon with the most substantial atmosphere in the Solar System is A) Iapetus B) Io C) Titan D) Triton E) Europa Spring 2013 Astronomy - Test 2 Test form A Name Do not forget to write your name and fill in the bubbles with your student number, and fill in test form A on the answer sheet. Write your name above as

More information

Overview of the Solar System

Overview of the Solar System The Solar System Overview of the Solar System Basics Source: Nine Planets - A Multimedia Tour of the Solar System * By Bill Arnett The solar system consists of the Sun, the nine planets, about 90 satellites

More information

Effective August 2007 All indicators in Standard / 14

Effective August 2007 All indicators in Standard / 14 8-4.1 Summarize the characteristics and movements of objects in the solar system (including planets, moons, asteroids, comets, and meteors). Taxonomy level: 2.4-B Understand Conceptual Knowledge Previous/Future

More information

Crosswalk of Georgia Performance Standards & Georgia Standards of Excellence GSE Implementation in Sixth Grade

Crosswalk of Georgia Performance Standards & Georgia Standards of Excellence GSE Implementation in Sixth Grade Implementation in 2017-18 S6E1. Students will explore current scientific views of the universe and how those views evolved. a. Relate the Nature of Science to the progression of basic historical scientific

More information

Learning Objectives. they differ in density (composition, core), atmosphere, surface age, size, geological activity, magnetic field?

Learning Objectives. they differ in density (composition, core), atmosphere, surface age, size, geological activity, magnetic field? Mercury and Venus Learning Objectives! Contrast the Earth, the Moon, Venus and Mercury. Do they differ in density (composition, core), atmosphere, surface age, size, geological activity, magnetic field?!

More information

Astronomy Ch. 8 The Moon and Mercury. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Astronomy Ch. 8 The Moon and Mercury. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Period: Date: Astronomy Ch. 8 The Moon and Mercury MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) The best way to find the exact distance

More information

V. ASTRONOMY: EARTH AND THE MOON

V. ASTRONOMY: EARTH AND THE MOON V. ASTRONOMY: EARTH AND THE MOON A. All planets and moons in the Solar System shine at optical wavelengths only because they reflect light from the Sun; they are too cold to emit thermal visible radiation.

More information

Layers of the Atmosphere

Layers of the Atmosphere Layers of the Atmosphere The atmosphere is a layer of gases around Earth. It is held in place by Earth s gravity. We usually call it air. The atmosphere is made up of about 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen.

More information

Astronomy 1140 Quiz 3 Review

Astronomy 1140 Quiz 3 Review Astronomy 1140 Quiz 3 Review Anil Pradhan October 27, 2017 I The Inner Planets 1. What are the terrestrial planets? What do they have in common? Terrestrial planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars. Theses

More information

Tectonics. Planets, Moons & Rings 9/11/13 movements of the planet s crust

Tectonics. Planets, Moons & Rings 9/11/13 movements of the planet s crust Tectonics Planets, Moons & Rings 9/11/13 movements of the planet s crust Planetary History Planets formed HOT Denser materials fall to center Planet cools by conduction, convection, radiation to space

More information

Phys 214. Planets and Life

Phys 214. Planets and Life Phys 214. Planets and Life Dr. Cristina Buzea Department of Physics Room 259 E-mail: cristi@physics.queensu.ca (Please use PHYS214 in e-mail subject) Lecture 10. Geology and life. Part 1 (Page 99-123)

More information

ASTRONOMY 1010 Exam 2 October 19, 2007

ASTRONOMY 1010 Exam 2 October 19, 2007 ASTRONOMY 1010 Exam 2 October 19, 2007 Name Please write and mark your name and student number in the Scantron answer sheet. FILL THE BUBBLE IN THE "TEST FORM" BOX CORRESPONDING TO YOUR TEST VERSION (listed

More information

Chapter 9 Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds

Chapter 9 Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Chapter 9 Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds 9.1 Connecting Planetary Interiors and Surfaces Our goals for learning What are terrestrial planets like on the inside? What causes geological

More information

COMPOSITION OF THE ATMOSPHERE

COMPOSITION OF THE ATMOSPHERE Skills Worksheet Directed Reading Section: Characteristics of the Atmosphere 1. Define atmosphere. 2. Describe two important functions served by Earth s atmosphere. COMPOSITION OF THE ATMOSPHERE 3. The

More information

ATMOSPHERE: ORIGIN, COMPOSITION, AND STRUCTURE

ATMOSPHERE: ORIGIN, COMPOSITION, AND STRUCTURE CHAPTER 2 ATMOSPHERE: ORIGIN, COMPOSITION, AND STRUCTURE MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS 1. A relatively thin envelope of gases and particles that encircles the planet is known as a. the jet stream. *b. the

More information

Dynamic Crust Practice

Dynamic Crust Practice 1. Base your answer to the following question on the cross section below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The cross section represents the distance and age of ocean-floor bedrock found on both sides

More information

Jupiter. Jupiter is the third-brightest object in the night sky (after the Moon and Venus). Exploration by Spacecrafts

Jupiter. Jupiter is the third-brightest object in the night sky (after the Moon and Venus). Exploration by Spacecrafts Jupiter Orbit, Rotation Physical Properties Atmosphere, surface Interior Magnetosphere Moons (Voyager 1) Jupiter is the third-brightest object in the night sky (after the Moon and Venus). Exploration by

More information

Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems. Jovian Planet Composition. Are jovian planets all alike? Density Differences. Density Differences

Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems. Jovian Planet Composition. Are jovian planets all alike? Density Differences. Density Differences Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems 11.1 A Different Kind of Planet Our goals for learning Are jovian planets all alike? What are jovian planets like on the inside? What is the weather like on jovian planets?

More information

8 th Grade Science. Reporting Category 3 STAAR

8 th Grade Science. Reporting Category 3 STAAR 8 th Grade Science Reporting Category 3 STAAR Which letter on the model illustrates rotation on an axis? This length of time takes one day. Which letter on the model illustrates a revolution around the

More information

SPI Use data to draw conclusions about the major components of the universe.

SPI Use data to draw conclusions about the major components of the universe. SPI 0607.6.1 - Use data to draw conclusions about the major components of the universe. o Stars are huge, hot, brilliant balls of gas trillions of kilometers away. A Galaxy is a collection of billions

More information

Chapter 10 Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds. What is an atmosphere? Earth s Atmosphere. Atmospheric Pressure

Chapter 10 Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds. What is an atmosphere? Earth s Atmosphere. Atmospheric Pressure Chapter 10 Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds 10.1 Atmospheric Basics Our goals for learning What is an atmosphere? How does the greenhouse effect warm a planet? Why do atmospheric

More information

Chapter 10 Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds

Chapter 10 Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Chapter 10 Planetary Atmospheres: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds 10.1 Atmospheric Basics Our goals for learning What is an atmosphere? How does the greenhouse effect warm a planet? Why do atmospheric

More information

Jupiter and its Moons

Jupiter and its Moons Jupiter and its Moons Summary 1. At an average distance of over 5 AU, Jupiter takes nearly 12 years to orbit the Sun 2. Jupiter is by far the largest and most massive planet in the solar system being over

More information

Activity 1-2: Origin of the Earth

Activity 1-2: Origin of the Earth Earth Science 11 Name: Block: Activity 1-2: Origin of the Earth Read the following passage, and then answer the questions at the end: Where Earth Science Begins: The Solar System Where shall the study

More information

Developed in Consultation with Georgia Educators

Developed in Consultation with Georgia Educators Developed in Consultation with Georgia Educators Table of Contents Georgia Performance Standards Correlation Chart........... 7 Performance Standards Chapter 1 Earth and Space.............................

More information

The achiever s guide to academic life and beyond

The achiever s guide to academic life and beyond SCIENCE PROFICIENCY (General Science) Directions: For each statement or question, choose the letter of the word or expression that, of those given, best completes or answers the question. Then on your

More information

8 th Grade Science Content Strand 4

8 th Grade Science Content Strand 4 8 th Grade Science Content Strand 4 Lithosphere solid, rigid, rocky divided into plates, sits on top of asthenosphere Includes crust & upper rocky mantle Asthenosphere plastic, flowing, hot, convection

More information

Chapter Introduction Lesson 1 Earth s Motion Lesson 2 Earth s Moon Lesson 3 Eclipses and Tides Chapter Wrap-Up. Jason Reed/Photodisc/Getty Images

Chapter Introduction Lesson 1 Earth s Motion Lesson 2 Earth s Moon Lesson 3 Eclipses and Tides Chapter Wrap-Up. Jason Reed/Photodisc/Getty Images Chapter Introduction Lesson 1 Earth s Motion Lesson 2 Earth s Moon Lesson 3 Eclipses and Tides Chapter Wrap-Up Jason Reed/Photodisc/Getty Images What natural phenomena do the motions of Earth and the Moon

More information

ASTRONOMY. S6E1 a, b, c, d, e, f S6E2 a, b, c,

ASTRONOMY. S6E1 a, b, c, d, e, f S6E2 a, b, c, ASTRONOMY S6E1 a, b, c, d, e, f S6E2 a, b, c, UNIVERSE Age 13.7 billion years old The Big Bang Theory Protons and Neutrons formed hydrogen and helium. This created heat that formed the stars. Other elements

More information

Plate Tectonics. Structure of the Earth

Plate Tectonics. Structure of the Earth Plate Tectonics Structure of the Earth The Earth can be considered as being made up of a series of concentric spheres, each made up of materials that differ in terms of composition and mechanical properties.

More information

Chapter 9 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 9 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 9 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds Planetary Geology: Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds 9.1 Connecting Planetary Interiors

More information

Climate Regulation. - What stabilizes the climate - Greenhouse effect

Climate Regulation. - What stabilizes the climate - Greenhouse effect Climate Regulation - What stabilizes the climate - Greenhouse effect Last time! Processes that shaped Earth: Volcanism, tectonics! How we retain atmospheric molecules ( escape speed )! A magnetic field

More information

Formation of the Earth and Solar System

Formation of the Earth and Solar System Formation of the Earth and Solar System a. Supernova and formation of primordial dust cloud. NEBULAR HYPOTHESIS b. Condensation of primordial dust. Forms disk-shaped nubular cloud rotating counterclockwise.

More information

PLATO - 5. Planetary atmospheres

PLATO - 5. Planetary atmospheres PLATO - 5 Planetary atmospheres 1 Mercury Smallest planet! 0.38 Earth radii! 0.055 Earth masses! 0.39 AU orbit (eccentric)! 350K surface temperature (ranges from 100K-700K)! Slow 59 day rotation (2/3 orbital

More information

Earth Space Systems. Semester 1 Exam. Astronomy Vocabulary

Earth Space Systems. Semester 1 Exam. Astronomy Vocabulary Earth Space Systems Semester 1 Exam Astronomy Vocabulary Astronomical Unit- Aurora- Big Bang- Black Hole- 1AU is the average distance between the Earth and the Sun (93 million miles). This unit of measurement

More information

Identify and explain monthly patterns in the phases of the Moon.

Identify and explain monthly patterns in the phases of the Moon. (NGSS in Parentheses) Grade Big Idea Essential Questions Concepts Competencies Vocabulary 2002 Standards The phases of the Moon are caused by the orbit of the moon around the Earth. (ESS1.A) The phases

More information

Plate Tectonics CHAPTER 17

Plate Tectonics CHAPTER 17 Plate Tectonics CHAPTER 17 Layers of the Earth A. Crust- solid, 5-70 km thick Moho Two Types of Crust: Oceanic- ocean floor, more dense then because of more iron Continental-dry land (mostly silicates

More information

Astronomy I Exam 2 Sample

Astronomy I Exam 2 Sample NAME: Part I: Multiple Choice (2 points. ea.) Read carefully, choose the best answer 1. Which of the following occurs because of the orbital motion of the Earth about the Sun and cannot be accounted for

More information

Features of Tectonic Plates

Features of Tectonic Plates Features of Tectonic Plates PowerPoint 12.2 The Earth s Layers Crust Brittle Continental crust composed mainly of granite Oceanic crust composed mainly of basalt Mantle Denser than the crust Upper is molten

More information

1 of 5 4/21/2015 6:40 PM

1 of 5 4/21/2015 6:40 PM 1 of 5 4/21/2015 6:40 PM 1. Which of the following lists the outer planets in order of increasing mass?,,,,,,,,,,,, 2. The surface structure of 's largest satellite, Titan, is completely unknown because

More information

17. According to the data below, what is the exact shape of the Earth?

17. According to the data below, what is the exact shape of the Earth? 1. The Earth is slightly flattened from a perfect spherical shape because of A) its rotation B) the pull of the sun and moon C) storms on the sun's surface D) its molten core 2. Which diagram most accurately

More information

Earth Science SOL Study Guide due DAY of SOL (test grade)

Earth Science SOL Study Guide due DAY of SOL (test grade) Name: DAY OF MY TEST: Block: Earth Science SOL Study Guide due DAY of SOL (test grade) Introductory Science: What s the difference between the independent and dependent variable? What is the control in

More information

I. Earth s Layers a. Crust: Earth s outside layer. Made of mostly rock. i. Continental: er; made of mostly granite, forms the continents and shallow

I. Earth s Layers a. Crust: Earth s outside layer. Made of mostly rock. i. Continental: er; made of mostly granite, forms the continents and shallow I. Earth s Layers a. Crust: Earth s outside layer. Made of mostly rock. i. Continental: er; made of mostly granite, forms the continents and shallow sea beds, floats! ii. Oceanic: er; dense rock such as

More information

Astronomy. physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am

Astronomy.  physics.wm.edu/~hancock/171/ A. Dayle Hancock. Small 239. Office hours: MTWR 10-11am Astronomy A. Dayle Hancock adhancock@wm.edu Small 239 Office hours: MTWR 10-11am The Moon The Moon's surface Humans on the Moon The Moon's interior The difference between Moon and Earth rocks The collision

More information

see disks around new stars in Orion nebula where planets are probably being formed 3

see disks around new stars in Orion nebula where planets are probably being formed 3 Planet Formation contracting cloud forms stars swirling disk of material around forming star (H, He, C, O, heavier elements, molecules, dust ) form planets New born star heats up material, blows away solar

More information

Terrestrial World Surfaces

Terrestrial World Surfaces 1 Terrestrial World Surfaces Solid rocky surfaces shaped (to varying degrees) by: Impact cratering Volcanism Tectonics (gross movement of surface by interior forces) Erosion (by impacts or by weather)

More information

Chapter 19 Exploring Space. I. Fill in the blank

Chapter 19 Exploring Space. I. Fill in the blank Chapter 19 Exploring Space 1. All radiation is classified by wavelength in the electromagnetic spectrum. 2. Two types of telescopes that collect visible light are refractors and reflectors. 3. An uncrewed

More information

Plate Tectonics: A Scientific Revolution Unfolds

Plate Tectonics: A Scientific Revolution Unfolds Chapter 2 Lecture Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology Eleventh Edition Plate Tectonics: A Scientific Revolution Unfolds Tarbuck and Lutgens From Continental Drift to Plate Tectonics Prior to the

More information

Chapter Review USING KEY TERMS. asthenosphere uplift continental drift. known as. tectonic plates move. object. UNDERSTANDING KEY IDEAS

Chapter Review USING KEY TERMS. asthenosphere uplift continental drift. known as. tectonic plates move. object. UNDERSTANDING KEY IDEAS Skills Worksheet Chapter Review USING KEY TERMS 1. Use the following terms in the same sentence: crust, mantle, and core. Complete each of the following sentences by choosing the correct term from the

More information

Earth Science: Earth's Place in the Universe Unit 2: The Moon

Earth Science: Earth's Place in the Universe Unit 2: The Moon Slide 1 / 127 Slide 2 / 127 New Jersey Center for Teaching and Learning Progressive Science Initiative This material is made freely available at www.njctl.org and is intended for the non-commercial use

More information

REVIEW CH #0. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1)

REVIEW CH #0. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1) REVIEW CH #0 TRUE/FALSE. Write 'T' if the statement is true and 'F' if the statement is false. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1) 2) Latitude and right ascension

More information

8 th Grade Science Plate Tectonics and Topography Review

8 th Grade Science Plate Tectonics and Topography Review 8 th Grade Science Plate Tectonics and Topography Review #1 Scientists believe that the land masses of Earth were once joined together as one supercontinent called. A: Australia B: Wegner C: Pangaea D:

More information

Physical Oceanography

Physical Oceanography Physical Oceanography SECTION 15.1 The Oceans In your textbook, read about modern oceanography. For each item in Column A, write the letter of the matching item in Column B. Column A 1. German research

More information

Galaxies and Stars. 3. Base your answer to the following question on The reaction below represents an energy-producing process.

Galaxies and Stars. 3. Base your answer to the following question on The reaction below represents an energy-producing process. Galaxies and Stars 1. To an observer on Earth, the Sun appears brighter than the star Rigel because the Sun is A) hotter than Rigel B) more luminous than Rigel C) closer than Rigel D) larger than Rigel

More information

The Sun sends the Earth:

The Sun sends the Earth: The Sun sends the Earth: Solar Radiation - peak wavelength.visible light - Travels at the speed of light..takes 8 minutes to reach Earth Solar Wind, Solar flares, and Coronal Mass Ejections of Plasma (ionized

More information

3 rd Grade Math Earth Science

3 rd Grade Math Earth Science 3 rd Grade Math Earth Science 6 th Grade Earth Science Teaching & Learning Framework * Clarification statements not provided on framework Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Unit 1 6 weeks Rocks and

More information

Nebular Hypothesis (Kant, Laplace 1796) - Earth and the other bodies of our solar system (Sun, moons, etc.) formed from a vast cloud of dust and

Nebular Hypothesis (Kant, Laplace 1796) - Earth and the other bodies of our solar system (Sun, moons, etc.) formed from a vast cloud of dust and Plate Tectonics Origin of Universe Big Bang model (Hubble, 1929) - The universe began with an explosive e expansion of matter, which later became what we know as stars, planets, moons, etc. This event

More information

Earth s Interior. Use Target Reading Skills. Exploring Inside Earth

Earth s Interior. Use Target Reading Skills. Exploring Inside Earth Plate Tectonics Name Date Class Earth s Interior This section explains how scientists learn about Earth s interior. The section also describes the layers that make up Earth and explains why Earth acts

More information

Heat Transfer. Heat Transfer. Convection Heat transfer due to the actual motion of a fluid. Conduction Heat transfer by successive atomic collisions

Heat Transfer. Heat Transfer. Convection Heat transfer due to the actual motion of a fluid. Conduction Heat transfer by successive atomic collisions Heat Transfer What are the different ways that heat can move from one place to another? Heat Transfer What are the different ways that heat can move from one place to another? Conduction Convection Radiation

More information

Science 1206 Unit 2: Weather Dynamics Worksheet 8: Layers of the Atmosphere

Science 1206 Unit 2: Weather Dynamics Worksheet 8: Layers of the Atmosphere Science 1206 Unit 2: Weather Dynamics Worksheet 8: Layers of the Atmosphere The atmosphere has a definite impact upon weather patterns and changes. At one time the atmosphere was once considered to be

More information

Earth Science Review Ch 1 & 2. Chapter 1 - Introduction to Earth Science

Earth Science Review Ch 1 & 2. Chapter 1 - Introduction to Earth Science Earth Science Review Ch 1 & 2 Chapter 1 - Introduction to Earth Science Lesson I - What is Earth Science Topic 1- Branches of Earth Science Earth Science - the study of Earth, its oceans, atmosphere, and

More information

Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems. Comparing the Jovian Planets. Jovian Planet Composition 4/10/16. Spacecraft Missions

Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems. Comparing the Jovian Planets. Jovian Planet Composition 4/10/16. Spacecraft Missions Chapter 11 Jovian Planet Systems Jovian Planet Interiors and Atmospheres How are jovian planets alike? What are jovian planets like on the inside? What is the weather like on jovian planets? Do jovian

More information

Lecture 11 Earth s Moon January 6d, 2014

Lecture 11 Earth s Moon January 6d, 2014 1 Lecture 11 Earth s Moon January 6d, 2014 2 Moon and Earth to Scale Distance: a = 385,000 km ~ 60R Eccentricity: e = 0.055 Galileo Spacecraft Dec. 1992 3 [Review question] Eclipses do not occur each month

More information