AP Chemistry: Acid-Base Chemistry Practice Problems

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "AP Chemistry: Acid-Base Chemistry Practice Problems"

Transcription

1 Name AP Chemistry: Acid-Base Chemistry Practice Problems Date Due Directions: Write your answers to the following questions in the space provided. For problem solving, show all of your work. Make sure that your answers show proper units, notation, and significant digits. 1. Although HCl and H 2 SO 4 have very different properties as pure substances, their aqueous solutions possess many common properties. List some general properties of these solutions, and explain their common behavior in terms of the species present. Solutions of HCl and H 2 SO 4 conduct electricity, taste sour, turn litmus paper red (are acidic), neutralize solutions of bases, and react with active metals to form H 2 (g). HCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions have these properties in common because both compounds are strong acids. That is, they both dissociate completely in H 2 O to form H + (aq) and an anion. (HSO 4 - is not completely dissociated, but the first dissociation step for H 2 SO 4 is complete.) The presence of ions enables the solutions to conduct electricity; the presence of H + (aq) in excess of M accounts for all other properties listed. 2. Although pure NaOH and CaO have very different properties, their aqueous solutions possess many common properties. List some general properties of these solutions, and explain their common behavior in terms of the species present. Solutions of NaOH and CaO conduct electricity, taste bitter, turn litmus paper blue (are basic), and neutralize solutions of acids. NaOH and CaO solutions have these properties in common because both compounds form basic solutions in water. That is, they both dissociate in H 2 O to form OH - (aq) and a cation. The presence of ions enables the solutions to conduct electricity; the presence of OH - (aq) in excess of M accounts for all other properties listed. 3. What is the difference between the Arrhenius and the Brønsted-Lowry definitions of an acid? The Arrhenius definition of an acid is confined to aqueous solution; the Brønsted-Lowry definition applies to any physical state. 4. Give the formulas for the conjugate base of H 2 SO 4 and the conjugate acid of CH 3 NH 2. HSO 4 - is the conjugate base of H 2 SO 4. CH 3 NH 3 + is the conjugate acid of CH 3 NH The hydrogen oxalate ion (HC 2 O - 4 ) is amphoteric. Write a balanced chemical equation showing how it acts as an acid toward water and another equation showing how it acts as a base toward water Acid: HC 2 O 4 + H 2 O C 2 O 4 + H 3 O + - Base: HC 2 O 4 + H 2 O H 2 C 2 O 4 + OH - 6. The general reaction of an acid dissolving in water may be shown as HA(aq) + H 2 O(l) H 3 O + (aq) + A - (aq) A conjugate acid base pair for this reaction is A. HA and H 2 O. B. HA and A -. C. H 2 O and A -. D. H 3 O + and A -. E. HA and H 3 O +. Answer: (B) The conjugate acid differs from its conjugate base by a proton, (H + ). The acid form has the proton (HA in this example) and the base form has lost the proton (A - in this case). 7. Write the dissociation reaction for each of the following acids. a. Acetic Acid (HC 2 H 3 O 2 ) HC 2 H 3 O 2 + H 2 O C 2 H 3 O 2- + H 3 O + or HC 2 H 3 O 2 H + + C 2 H 3 O 2- b. The ammonium ion (NH 4 + ) NH H 2 O NH 3 + H 3 O + or NH 4 + H + + NH 3 1

2 8. Identify the Lewis acid and the Lewis base in each of the following reactions. a. 2NH 3 (aq) + Ag + (aq) Ag(NH 3 ) + 2 (aq) base acid b. BF 3 (g) + F - (aq) BF - 4 (aq) acid base 9. Aluminum hydroxide is an amphoteric substance. It can act as either a Brønsted-Lowry base or a Lewis acid. Write a reaction showing Al(OH) 3 acting as a base toward H+ and as an acid toward OH-. Al(OH) 3 (s) + 3H + (aq) Al 3+ (aq) + 3H 2 O(l) (Brønsted-Lowry base, H + acceptor) Al(OH) 3 (s) + OH - (aq) Al(OH) - 4 (aq) (Lewis acid, electron pair acceptor) 10. Would you expect Fe 3+ or Fe 2+ to be the stronger Lewis acid? Explain. Fe 3+ should be the stronger Lewis acid. Fe 3+ is smaller and has a greater positive charge. Because of this, Fe 3+ will be more strongly attracted to lone pairs of electrons as compared to Fe Differentiate between the terms strength and concentration as they apply to acids and bases. Strength refers to how well an acid or base dissociates in water. Concentration refers to the amount of acid or base dissolved in solution. 12. Strong acids are those which A. have an equilibrium lying far to the left. B. yield a weak conjugate base when reacting with water. C. have a conjugate base which is stronger base than water. D. readily remove the H + ions from water. E. are only slightly dissociated (ionized) at equilibrium. Answer: (B) Strong acids give up their protons (H + ions) easily. If their conjugate base form were strong, then the acid formed would hold strongly to the H +, which would not be a characteristic of a strong acid. 13. Classify each of the following as a strong acid or a weak acid in aqueous solution. a. HNO 2 Weak e. HClO 4 Strong b. HNO 3 Strong f. HClO Weak c. HCl Strong g. H 2 SO 4 Strong d. HF Weak h. HSO Arrange the following in order of increasing acid strength. a. H 2 O K a = Weak b. HNO 2 K a = H 2 O < NH + 4 < HOCl < HNO 2 c. HOCl K a = d. NH 4 + K a = At the freezing point of water (0 C), K w = Calculate [H + ] and [OH - ] for a neutral solution at this temperature. Since [H + ] = [OH - ] and K w = [H+][OH - ] = Calculate ph and poh for each of the following solutions at 25 C. a M OH - ph = 11.00; poh = 3.00 b. 1.0 M H + ph = 0.00; poh =

3 17. The [OH - ] of a certain aqueous solution is M. The ph of this same solution must be A B C D E Answer: (D) Referring to ph + poh = at 25 C, if [OH - ] = M, poh = 5.0, ph = = Calculate the ph of 0.10 M HNO 3. This is a strong acid. Therefore the ph = -log[0.10] = Calculate the ph of M KOH. This is a strong base. Therefore the poh = -log[ ] = poh = = Calculate the ph of a solution made by adding g of sodium hydride (NaH) to enough water to make L of solution. NaH + H 2 O NaOH + H 2 poh = -log(0.2500) = ph = = The calculation of concentration and ph for weak acids is more complex than for strong acids due to A. the incomplete ionization of weak acids. B. the low K a value for strong acids. C. the more complex atomic structures of strong acids. D. the low percent ionization of strong acids. E. the inconsistent K b value for strong acids. Answer: (A) Strong acids ionize 100%, therefore the [H+] is equal to the initial concentration of the strong acid. This is not the case for weak acids. Since not all of the acid ionizes, it is necessary to determine both how much of the acid forms H + and how much is left in molecular form. 22. When calculating the poh of a hydrofluoric acid solution (K a = ) from its concentration, the contribution of water ionizing (K w = ) is usually ignored because A. hydrofluoric acid is such a weak acid. B. hydrofluoric acid can dissolve glass. C. the ionization of water provides relatively few H + ions. D. the [OH - ] for pure water is unknown. E. the conjugate base of HF is such a strong base. Answer: (C) By comparing the K a for HF with K w (for water), you can see that even though hydrofluoric acid is a very weak acid it is a much stronger acid than is water, so much so that H + ion contributions of water may be ignored. 23. In many calculations for the ph of a weak acid from the concentration of the acid, an assumption is made that often takes the form [HA] 0 x = [HA] 0. A. is valid because x is very small compared to the initial concentration of the weak acid. B. is valid because the concentration of the acid changes by such large amounts. C. is valid because actual value of x cannot be known. D. is valid because ph is not dependent upon the concentration of the weak acid. E. approximation is always shown to be valid and so need not be checked. Answer: (A) We can expect x to be very small (as indicated by the low value for K a for weak acids), so that the concentration of the weak acid does not significantly change from its initial value. As the final step in such problems, you must determine that the change in the initial [HA] is less than 5% for the approximation to be considered valid. 3

4 24. Lactic acid (HC 3 H 5 O 3 ) has one acidic hydrogen. A 0.10 M solution of lactic acid has a ph of Calculate K a. [H + ] = [C 3 H 5 O 3 - ] = antilog(-2.44) = = = x R HC 3 H 5 O 3 H C 3 H 5 O 3 I 0.10 M 0 0 C -x + x + x E 0.10 M x 0.10 M x x The acid-dissociation constant for benzoic acid (HC 7 H 5 O 2 ) is Calculate the equilibrium concentrations of H +, C 7 H 5 O 2 -, and HC 7 H 5 O 2 in the solution if the initial concentration of HC 7 H 5 O 2 is M. 26. Calculate the ph of a solution containing a mixture of 0.10 M HCl and 0.10 M HOCl. (The Ka for HOCl is ). 27. The percent dissociation (percent ionization) for weak acids A. is always the same for a given acid, no matter what the concentration. B. usually increases as the acid becomes more concentrated. C. compares the amount of acid that has dissociated at equilibrium with the initial concentration of the acid. D. may only be used to express the dissociation of weak acids. E. has no meaning for polyprotic acids. Answer: (C) The percent dissociation does change with the concentration. For example, 1.0 M acetic acid does not ionize nearly as much as 0.10 M acetic acid. The term applies to the amount of acid dissociated/the initial concentration, expressed as a percent. 4

5 28. HA is a weak acid which 4.0% dissociated at M. Determine the K a for this acid. A D. 1.6 B E C Answer: (B) [HA] 0 = M 4.0% of = [H + ] = [A - ] = M Note that although the actual value for [HA] is = M, this approximation is within the 5% rule, and you do not get to use your calculator for the multiple choice portion of the test. 29. Saccharin, a sugar substitute, is a weak acid with a pk a = 2.32 at 25 C. It ionizes in aqueous solution as follows: HNC 7 H 4 SO 3 (aq) H + (aq) + NC 7 H 4 SO 3 - (aq) What is the ph of a 0.10 M solution of this substance? K a = = x 2 = (0.10-x) = x x x x = and (discard) ph = -log(0.020) = Phosphoric acid, H 3 PO 4, is a triprotic acid. a. Show the three equations involved in the dissociation of this substance. H 3 PO 4 (aq) H + (aq) + H 2 PO 4 - (aq) H 2 PO 4 - (aq) H + (aq) + HPO 4 2- (aq) HPO 4 2- (aq) H + (aq) + PO 4 3- (aq) b. Illustrate how these three equations might be combined to show the complete dissociation of phosphoric acid. H 3 PO 4 (aq) H + (aq) + H 2 PO 4 - (aq) H 2 PO 4 - (aq) H + (aq) + HPO 4 2- (aq) HPO 4 2- (aq) H + (aq) + PO 4 3- (aq) H 3 PO 4 (aq) 3H + (aq) + PO 4 3- (aq) c. If 7.0 M H 3 PO 4 solution dissociated, calculate the ph of the solution a1 a2 a3 K = K = K = Note that only the first dissociation forms significant amounts of H +, so use: If x = [H + ]=[H 2 PO 4 - ] Assume [H 3 PO 4 ] 0 = 7.0 x 7.0 M ph = -log[h+]= -log(0.23)=0.64 Note: Check to see that (7.0-x) ( ) is about equal to 7.0, (this is within the allowable 5%, as the rule suggests, since 5% of 7.0 is 0.35), therefore the assumption is acceptable. 5

6 d. Determine the concentration for the ions H 2 PO 4 -, HPO 4 2-, and PO 4 3- (aq) in the dissociated 7.0 M H 3 PO 4 solution. From part (c), [H + ] = 0.23 M = [H 2 PO 4 - ]. H 2 PO 4 - (aq) H + (aq) + HPO 4 2- (aq) K a = [HPO 4 2- ] = M For [PO 4 3- ]: HPO 4 2- (aq) H + (aq) + PO 4 3- (aq) K a = [H+]=0.23 M (from above) [HPO 4 2- ] = M (also from above) e. Determine the poh for this same 7.0 M H 3 PO 4 solution. From part c, ph = ph + poh = 14.00; ph = = Ionic substances known as salts can form acidic, basic, and neutral solutions when dissolved in water. When dissolved in water A. KNO 3 forms a basic solution. B. NaCl forms an acidic solution. C. NaNO 3 forms an acidic solution. D. NaF forms a basic solution. E. KClO 4 forms an acidic solution. Answer: (D) NaF is the salt produced from the reaction of a weak acid with a strong base. 32. Are solutions of the following salts acidic, basic, or neutral? For those that are not neutral, write balanced chemical equations for the reactions causing the solution to be acidic or basic. The relevant K a and K b values are found in Tables 14.2 and 14.3 of your textbook. a. NaNO 3 neutral b. NaNO 2 basic NO 2- + H 2 O HNO 2 + OH - c. C 5 H 5 NHClO 4 acidic C 5 H 5 NH + + H 2 O C 5 H 5 N + H 3 O + d. NH 4 NO 2 acidic (K a for NH 4 + > K b for NO 2 - ) NH H 2 O NH 3 + H 3 O + e. KOCl basic OCl - + H 2 O HOCl + OH - f. NH 4 OCl basic (K b for OCl - > K a for NH 4 + ) OCl - + H 2 O HOCl + OH An unknown salt is either NaCN, NaC 2 H 3 O 2, NaF, NaCl, or NaOCl. When mol of the salt is dissolved in 1.00 L of water, the ph of the solution is What is the identity of the salt? 6

7 34. Calculate the ph of a 0.10 M CH 3 NH 3 Cl solutions. 35. What components must be present in order to have a buffered solution? For what purposes are buffers used? What is meant by the capacity of a buffer? A buffered solution must contain a weak acid or base and its salt. Buffered solutions are useful for controlling the ph of a solution since they resist ph change. The capacity of a buffer is a measure of how much strong acid or strong base the buffer can neutralize. 36. Write reactions to show how a solution containing acetic acid and sodium acetate acts as a buffer when a strong acid or base is added. H 3 O C 2 H 3 O 2 HC 2 H 3 O 2 + H 2 O OH HC 2 H 3 O 2 C 2 H 3 O 2 + H 2 O 37. Calculate the ph of a solution that is 1.00 M HNO 2 and 1.00 M NaNO 2. The K a of nitrous acid = Consider the acids in Table 14.2 of your textbook. Which acid would be the best choice for preparing a ph = 7.00 buffer? Explain how to make 1.0 L of this buffer. The best acid choice for a ph = 7.00 buffer would be the weak acid with a pk a close to 7.0 or a K a HOCl is the best choice in Table 14.2 (Ka = ; pka = 7.46). To make this buffer, we need to calculate the [base]/[acid] ratio. Any OCl-/HOCl buffer in a concentration ratio of 0.35:1 will have a ph = One possibility is [NaOCl] = 0.35 M and [HOCl] = 1.0 M 7

8 39. Consider the titration of 40.0 ml of M HClO 4 by M KOH. Calculate the ph of the resulting solution after the following volumes of KOH have been added. a. 0.0 ml Since only the strong acid is present, the ph = -log(0.200) = b ml ph = c ml ph = d ml ph = 7.00 e ml ph = f. Which of the indicators in Fig (page 756) could be used for the titration? Bromothymol blue or phenol red 8

9 40. Consider the titration of ml of M acetic acid (K a = ) by M KOH. Calculate the ph of the resulting solution after the following volumes of KOH have been added. a. 0.0 ml ph = 2.72 b ml ph = 4.26 c ml ph = 4.74 d ml ph = 5.22 e ml ph = 8.79 f ml ph = g. Which of the indicators in Fig (page 756) could be used for the titration? o-cresolphthalein or phenolphthalein 9

10 41. Write balanced net ionic equations for each of the following. a. Ethanol is burned in oxygen. C 2 H 5 OH + 3O 2 2CO 2 + 3H 2 O b. A strip of magnesium is heated strongly in pure nitrogen gas. 3Mg + N 2 Mg 3 N 2 c. Dinitrogen trioxide gas is bubbled into water. N 2 O 3 + H 2 O 2HNO 2 d. A small piece of sodium metal is added to distilled water. 2Na + 2H 2 O 2Na + + 2OH - + H 2 e. A solution of sodium bromide is added to an acidified solution of potassium bromate. This is a redox reaction. Br - Br 2 - BrO 3 Br 2 2Br - Br 2 12H BrO 3 Br 2 + 6H 2 O 2Br - Br 2 + 2e - 10e H BrO 3 Br 2 + 6H 2 O 10Br - 5Br e - 10e H BrO 3 Br 2 + 6H 2 O 10Br H BrO 3 5Br 2 + Br 2 + 6H 2 O 10

A) Arrhenius Acids produce H+ and bases produce OH not always used because it only IDs X OH as basic species

A) Arrhenius Acids produce H+ and bases produce OH not always used because it only IDs X OH as basic species 3 ACID AND BASE THEORIES: A) Arrhenius Acids produce H+ and bases produce OH not always used because it only IDs X OH as basic species B) Bronsted and Lowry Acid = H + donor > CB = formed after H + dissociates

More information

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY ACIDS, BASES, AND AQUEOUS EQUILIBRIA

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY ACIDS, BASES, AND AQUEOUS EQUILIBRIA ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY ACIDS, BASES, AND AQUEOUS EQUILIBRIA Acids- taste sour Bases(alkali)- taste bitter and feel slippery Arrhenius concept- acids produce hydrogen ions in aqueous solution while

More information

15 Acids, Bases, and Salts. Lemons and limes are examples of foods that contain acidic solutions.

15 Acids, Bases, and Salts. Lemons and limes are examples of foods that contain acidic solutions. 15 Acids, Bases, and Salts Lemons and limes are examples of foods that contain acidic solutions. Chapter Outline 15.1 Acids and Bases 15.2 Reactions of Acids and Bases 15.3 Salts 15.4 Electrolytes and

More information

Advanced Placement Chemistry Chapters Syllabus

Advanced Placement Chemistry Chapters Syllabus As you work through the chapter, you should be able to: Advanced Placement Chemistry Chapters 14 16 Syllabus Chapter 14 Acids and Bases 1. Describe acid and bases using the Bronsted-Lowry, Arrhenius, and

More information

Chemistry I Notes Unit 10: Acids and Bases

Chemistry I Notes Unit 10: Acids and Bases Chemistry I Notes Unit 10: Acids and Bases Acids 1. Sour taste. 2. Acids change the color of acid- base indicators (turn blue litmus red). 3. Some acids react with active metals and release hydrogen gas,

More information

Unit 2 Acids and Bases

Unit 2 Acids and Bases Unit 2 Acids and Bases 1 Topics Properties / Operational Definitions Acid-Base Theories ph & poh calculations Equilibria (Kw, K a, K b ) Indicators Titrations STSE: Acids Around Us 2 Operational Definitions

More information

CHAPTER 14 ACIDS AND BASES

CHAPTER 14 ACIDS AND BASES CHAPTER 14 ACIDS AND BASES Topics Definition of acids and bases Bronsted-Lowry Concept Dissociation constant of weak acids Acid strength Calculating ph for strong and weak acids and bases Polyprotic acids

More information

Chapter 16 exercise. For the following reactions, use figure 16.4 to predict whether the equilibrium lies predominantly. - (aq) + OH - (aq)

Chapter 16 exercise. For the following reactions, use figure 16.4 to predict whether the equilibrium lies predominantly. - (aq) + OH - (aq) 1 Chapter 16 exercise Q1. Practice exercise page 671 Write the formula for the conjugate acid of the following, HSO 3, F, PO 4 3 and CO. HSO 3 H H 2 SO 4 F H HF PO 4 3 H HPO 4 2 CO H HCO Q2. Practice exercise

More information

Acid/Base Definitions

Acid/Base Definitions Acids and Bases Acid/Base Definitions Arrhenius Model Acids produce hydrogen ions in aqueous solutions Bases produce hydroxide ions in aqueous solutions Bronsted-Lowry Model Acids are proton donors Bases

More information

CHEMISTRY 102 Fall 2010 Hour Exam III. 1. My answers for this Chemistry 102 exam should be graded with the answer sheet associated with:

CHEMISTRY 102 Fall 2010 Hour Exam III. 1. My answers for this Chemistry 102 exam should be graded with the answer sheet associated with: 1. My answers for this Chemistry 10 exam should be graded with the answer sheet associated with: a) Form A b) Form B c) Form C d) Form D e) Form E Consider the titration of 30.0 ml of 0.30 M HCN by 0.10

More information

CHEM Dr. Babb s Sections Exam #3 Review Sheet

CHEM Dr. Babb s Sections Exam #3 Review Sheet CHEM 116 Dr. Babb s Sections Exam #3 Review Sheet Acid/Base Theories and Conjugate AcidBase Pairs 111. Define the following terms: Arrhenius acid, Arrhenius base, Lewis acid, Lewis base, BronstedLowry

More information

Chapter Menu Chapter Menu

Chapter Menu Chapter Menu Chapter Menu Chapter Menu Section 18.1 Section 18.3 Section 18.4 Introduction to Acids and Bases Hydrogen Ions and ph Neutralization Section 18.1 Intro to Acids and Bases Objectives: Compare the Arrhenius,

More information

Weak acids are only partially ionized in aqueous solution: mixture of ions and un-ionized acid in solution.

Weak acids are only partially ionized in aqueous solution: mixture of ions and un-ionized acid in solution. 16.6 Weak Acids Weak acids are only partially ionized in aqueous solution: mixture of ions and un-ionized acid in solution. Therefore, weak acids are in equilibrium: HA(aq) + H 2 O(l) H 3 O + (aq) + A

More information

Chapter 14. Acids and Bases

Chapter 14. Acids and Bases Chapter 14 Acids and Bases Section 14.1 The Nature of Acids and Bases Models of Acids and Bases Arrhenius: Acids produce H + ions in solution, bases produce OH - ions. Brønsted Lowry: Acids are proton

More information

CHEMISTRY Matter and Change

CHEMISTRY Matter and Change CHEMISTRY Matter and Change UNIT 18 Table Of Contents Section 18.1 Introduction to Acids and Bases Unit 18: Acids and Bases Section 18.2 Section 18.3 Section 18.4 Strengths of Acids and Bases Hydrogen

More information

Unit 9. Acids, Bases, & Salts Acid/Base Equilibrium

Unit 9. Acids, Bases, & Salts Acid/Base Equilibrium Unit 9 Acids, Bases, & Salts Acid/Base Equilibrium Properties of Acids sour or tart taste strong acids burn; weak acids feel similar to H 2 O acid solutions are electrolytes acids react with most metals

More information

SCH4U Chapter 8 review

SCH4U Chapter 8 review Name: Class: Date: SCH4U Chapter 8 review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Which statement does not describe a characteristic of acidic

More information

ACIDS AND BASES. HCl(g) = hydrogen chloride HCl(aq) = hydrochloric acid HCl(g) H + (aq) + Cl (aq) ARRHENIUS THEORY

ACIDS AND BASES. HCl(g) = hydrogen chloride HCl(aq) = hydrochloric acid HCl(g) H + (aq) + Cl (aq) ARRHENIUS THEORY ACIDS AND BASES A. CHARACTERISTICS OF ACIDS AND BASES 1. Acids and bases are both ionic compounds that are dissolved in water. Since acids and bases both form ionic solutions, their solutions conduct electricity

More information

Acids and Bases. Unit 10

Acids and Bases. Unit 10 Acids and Bases Unit 10 1 Properties of Acids and Bases Acids Bases Taste Sour Turns Litmus Dye Red Reacts with Metals to give H 2 (g) Taste Bitter Turns Litmus Dye Blue Do Not React with Metals Reacts

More information

Grace King High School Chemistry Test Review

Grace King High School Chemistry Test Review CHAPTER 19 Acids, Bases & Salts 1. ACIDS Grace King High School Chemistry Test Review UNITS 7 SOLUTIONS &ACIDS & BASES Arrhenius definition of Acid: Contain Hydrogen and produce Hydrogen ion (aka proton),

More information

Acids and Bases. Feb 28 4:40 PM

Acids and Bases. Feb 28 4:40 PM Acids and Bases H O s O Cl H O O H H N H Na O H H Feb 28 4:40 PM Properties of Acids 1. Taste sour 2. Conduct electrical current 3. Liberate H 2 gas when reacted with a metal. 4. Cause certain dyes to

More information

Acids And Bases. H + (aq) + Cl (aq) ARRHENIUS THEORY

Acids And Bases. H + (aq) + Cl (aq) ARRHENIUS THEORY Acids And Bases A. Characteristics of Acids and Bases 1. Acids and bases are both ionic compounds that are dissolved in water. Since acids and bases both form ionic solutions, their solutions conduct electricity

More information

Properties of Acids and Bases

Properties of Acids and Bases Chapter 15 Aqueous Equilibria: Acids and Bases Properties of Acids and Bases Generally, an acid is a compound that releases hydrogen ions, H +, into water. Blue litmus is used to test for acids. Blue litmus

More information

CHEMISTRY 102 Fall 2010 Hour Exam III Page My answers for this Chemistry 102 exam should be graded with the answer sheet associated with:

CHEMISTRY 102 Fall 2010 Hour Exam III Page My answers for this Chemistry 102 exam should be graded with the answer sheet associated with: Hour Exam III Page 1 1. My answers for this Chemistry 102 exam should be graded with the answer sheet associated with: a) Form A b) Form B c) Form C d) Form D e) Form E Consider the titration of 30.0 ml

More information

Chapter 15. Properties of Acids. Structure of Acids 7/3/08. Acid and Bases

Chapter 15. Properties of Acids. Structure of Acids 7/3/08. Acid and Bases Chapter 15 Acid and Bases Properties of Acids! Sour taste! React with active metals! React with carbonates, producing CO 2! Change color of vegetable dyes!blue litmus turns red! React with bases to form

More information

Chapter 14. Objectives

Chapter 14. Objectives Section 1 Properties of Acids and Bases Objectives List five general properties of aqueous acids and bases. Name common binary acids and oxyacids, given their chemical formulas. List five acids commonly

More information

Chapter 14 Acids and Bases

Chapter 14 Acids and Bases Properties of Acids and Bases Chapter 14 Acids and Bases Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927) First to develop a theory for acids and bases in aqueous solution Arrhenius Acids Compounds which dissolve (dissociate)

More information

Assignment 16 A incorrect

Assignment 16 A incorrect Assignment 16 A 1- What is the concentration of hydronium ions in a solution with a hydroxide-ion concentration of 2.31 10 4 M at 25 C? a) 4.33 10 11 M b) 2.31 10 4 M c) 2.31 10 18 M d) 2.31 10 10 M (The

More information

Chapter 10. Acids and Bases

Chapter 10. Acids and Bases Chapter 10 Acids and Bases 1 Properties of Aqueous Solutions of Acids and Bases Aqueous acidic solutions have the following properties: 1. They have a sour taste.. They change the colors of many indicators.

More information

Acids and Bases Written Response

Acids and Bases Written Response Acids and Bases Written Response January 1999 4. Consider the salt sodium oxalate, Na2C2O4. a) Write the dissociation equation for sodium oxalate. (1 mark) b) A 1.0M solution of sodium oxalate turns pink

More information

Solutions are aqueous and the temperature is 25 C unless stated otherwise.

Solutions are aqueous and the temperature is 25 C unless stated otherwise. Solutions are aqueous and the temperature is 25 C unless stated otherwise. 1. According to the Arrhenius definition, an acid is a substance that produces ions in aqueous solution. A. H C. OH B. H + D.

More information

11/15/11. Chapter 16. HA(aq) + H 2 O(l) H 3 O + (aq) + A (aq) acid base conjugate conjugate

11/15/11. Chapter 16. HA(aq) + H 2 O(l) H 3 O + (aq) + A (aq) acid base conjugate conjugate Chapter 16 Table of Contents Chapter 16 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 Buffered Solutions Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 2 Models of Arrhenius: Acids produce H + ions in solution, bases

More information

ph calculations MUDr. Jan Pláteník, PhD Brønsted-Lowry concept of acids and bases Acid is a proton donor Base is a proton acceptor

ph calculations MUDr. Jan Pláteník, PhD Brønsted-Lowry concept of acids and bases Acid is a proton donor Base is a proton acceptor ph calculations MUDr. Jan Pláteník, PhD Brønsted-Lowry concept of acids and bases Acid is a proton donor Base is a proton acceptor HCl(aq) + H 2 O(l) H 3 O + (aq) + Cl - (aq) Acid Base Conjugate acid Conjugate

More information

Unit 10: Acids and Bases

Unit 10: Acids and Bases Unit 10: Acids and Bases PROPERTIES OF ACIDS & BASES Properties of an Acid: a Tastes sour substance which dissociates (ionizes, breaks apart in solution) in water to form hydrogen ions Turns blue litmus

More information

Name Date Class ACID-BASE THEORIES

Name Date Class ACID-BASE THEORIES 19.1 ACID-BASE THEORIES Section Review Objectives Define the properties of acids and bases Compare and contrast acids and bases as defined by the theories of Arrhenius, Brønsted-Lowry, and Lewis Vocabulary

More information

HA(aq) H + (aq) + A (aq) We can write an equilibrium constant expression for this dissociation: [ ][ ]

HA(aq) H + (aq) + A (aq) We can write an equilibrium constant expression for this dissociation: [ ][ ] 16.6 Weak Acids Weak acids are only partially ionized in aqueous solution. There is a mixture of ions and un-ionized acid in solution. Therefore, weak acids are in equilibrium: Or: HA(aq) + H 2 O(l) H

More information

Chpt 16: Acids and Bases

Chpt 16: Acids and Bases Chpt 16 Acids and Bases Defining Acids Arrhenius: Acid: Substances when dissolved in water increase the concentration of H+. Base: Substances when dissolved in water increase the concentration of OH- Brønsted-Lowry:

More information

A) Fe B) Al C) P D) OH - 5) Which salt would form an acidic solution when it dissolves in water?

A) Fe B) Al C) P D) OH - 5) Which salt would form an acidic solution when it dissolves in water? AP Chemistry Test (Chapters 14 and 15) 1) Which one would hydrolyze water the most? A) NH 4 + B) Cl C) Na + D) ClO 3 2) Which one is most likely to be a Lewis acid? A) Fe B) Al C) P D) OH 3) What is the

More information

CHAPTER 19. Acids, Bases, and Salts Acid Base Theories

CHAPTER 19. Acids, Bases, and Salts Acid Base Theories CHAPTER 19 Acids, Bases, and Salts 19.1 Acid Base Theories ACIDS tart or sour taste Electrolytes Strong acids are corrosive Acid Facts... indicators will change color Blue litmus paper turns pink react

More information

Chapter 16. Acids and Bases. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 1

Chapter 16. Acids and Bases. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 1 Chapter 16 Acids and Bases Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 1 Section 16.1 Acids and Bases Models of Acids and Bases Arrhenius: Acids produce H + ions in solution, bases produce OH ions.

More information

ACIDS, BASES & SALTS DR. RUCHIKA YADU

ACIDS, BASES & SALTS DR. RUCHIKA YADU ACIDS, BASES & SALTS DR. RUCHIKA YADU Properties of Acids Acid is a compound which yields hydrogen ion (H+), when dissolved in water. Acid is sour to the taste and corrosive in nature. The ph value of

More information

(Label the Conjugate Pairs) Water in the last example acted as a Bronsted-Lowry base, and here it is acting as an acid. or

(Label the Conjugate Pairs) Water in the last example acted as a Bronsted-Lowry base, and here it is acting as an acid. or Chapter 16 - Acid-Base Equilibria Arrhenius Definition produce hydrogen ions in aqueous solution. produce hydroxide ions when dissolved in water. Limits to aqueous solutions. Only one kind of base. NH

More information

Chem 1046 Lecture Notes Chapter 17

Chem 1046 Lecture Notes Chapter 17 Chem 1046 Lecture Notes Chapter 17 Updated 01-Oct-2012 The Chemistry of Acids and Bases These Notes are to SUPPLIMENT the Text, They do NOT Replace reading the Text Book Material. Additional material that

More information

Acids, Bases and ph Preliminary Course. Steffi Thomas 14/09/2017

Acids, Bases and ph Preliminary Course. Steffi Thomas 14/09/2017 Acids, Bases and ph Preliminary Course Steffi Thomas ssthomas@tcd.ie 14/09/2017 Outline What are acids and bases? Can we provide a general definition of acid and base? How can we quantify acidity and basicity?

More information

Chem 103 Exam #1. Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Multiple Choice

Chem 103 Exam #1. Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Multiple Choice Chem 103 Exam #1 Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Which of the following can act as a Bronsted-Lowry base, but not as a Bronsted-Lowry

More information

I II III IV. Volume HCl added. 1. An equation representing the reaction of a weak acid with water is

I II III IV. Volume HCl added. 1. An equation representing the reaction of a weak acid with water is 1. An equation representing the reaction of a weak acid with water is A. HCl + H 2 O H 3 O + + Cl B. NH 3 + H 2 O NH 4 + + OH C. HCO 3 H 2 O H 2 CO 3 + OH D. HCOOH + H 2 O H 3 O + + HCOO 2. The equilibrium

More information

Unit 6: ACIDS AND BASES

Unit 6: ACIDS AND BASES Unit 6: Acids and Bases Honour Chemistry Unit 6: ACIDS AND BASES Chapter 16: Acids and Bases 16.1: Brønsted Acids and Bases Physical and Chemical Properties of Acid and Base Acids Bases Taste Sour (Citric

More information

Chem 106 Thursday, March 10, Chapter 17 Acids and Bases

Chem 106 Thursday, March 10, Chapter 17 Acids and Bases Chem 106 Thursday, March 10, 2011 Chapter 17 Acids and Bases K a and acid strength Acid + base reactions: Four types (s +s, s + w, w + s, and w + w) Determining K from concentrations and ph ph of aqueous

More information

Chapter 7 Acids and Bases

Chapter 7 Acids and Bases Chapter 7 Acids and Bases 7.1 The Nature of Acids and Bases 7.2 Acid Strength 7.3 The ph Scale 7.4 Calculating the ph of Strong Acid Solutions 7.5 Calculating the ph of Weak Acid Solutions 7.6 Bases 7.7

More information

Advanced Chemistry. Approximate Timeline. Students are expected to keep up with class work when absent. CHAPTER 14 ACIDS & BASES

Advanced Chemistry. Approximate Timeline. Students are expected to keep up with class work when absent. CHAPTER 14 ACIDS & BASES Advanced Chemistry Approximate Timeline Students are expected to keep up with class work when absent. CHAPTER 14 ACIDS & BASES Day Plans for the day Assignment(s) for the day 14.1 The Nature of Acids &

More information

Chapter 16. Acid-Base Equilibria

Chapter 16. Acid-Base Equilibria Chapter 16. Acid-Base Equilibria 16.1 Acids and Bases: A Brief Review Acids taste sour and cause certain dyes to change color. Bases taste bitter and feel soapy. Arrhenius concept of acids and bases: An

More information

NATURE OF ACIDS & BASES

NATURE OF ACIDS & BASES General Properties: NATURE OF ACIDS & BASES ACIDS BASES Taste sour Bitter Change color of indicators Blue Litmus turns red no change Red Litmus no change turns blue Phenolphtalein Colorless turns pink

More information

Chemistry 102 Chapter 15 ACID-BASE CONCEPTS

Chemistry 102 Chapter 15 ACID-BASE CONCEPTS General Properties: ACID-BASE CONCEPTS ACIDS BASES Taste sour Bitter Change color of indicators Blue Litmus turns red no change Red Litmus no change turns blue Phenolphtalein Colorless turns pink Neutralization

More information

CHE 107 Summer 2017 Exam 3

CHE 107 Summer 2017 Exam 3 CHE 107 Summer 2017 Exam 3 Question #: 1 What is the ph of a 0.10 M hydrocyanic acid (HCN) solution. Ka = 4.9 10-10. A. 2.56 C. 4.04 B. 3.17 D. 5.15 Question #: 2 Original Windex has a ph = 11.60 and [H

More information

CHAPTER 13: ACIDS & BASES. Section Arrhenius Acid & Bases Svante Arrhenius, Swedish chemist ( ).

CHAPTER 13: ACIDS & BASES. Section Arrhenius Acid & Bases Svante Arrhenius, Swedish chemist ( ). CHAPTER 13: ACIDS & BASES Section 13.1 Arrhenius Acid & Bases Svante Arrhenius, Swedish chemist (1839-1927). He understood that aqueous solutions of acids and bases conduct electricity (they are electrolytes).

More information

5/10/2017. Chapter 10. Acids, Bases, and Salts

5/10/2017. Chapter 10. Acids, Bases, and Salts Chapter 10. Acids, Bases, and Salts Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry Instructor Dr. Upali Siriwardane (Ph.D. Ohio State) E-mail: upali@latech.edu Office: 311 Carson Taylor Hall ; Phone: 318-257-4941;

More information

Acids, Bases, & Neutralization Chapter 20 & 21 Assignment & Problem Set

Acids, Bases, & Neutralization Chapter 20 & 21 Assignment & Problem Set Acids, Bases, & Neutralization Name Warm-Ups (Show your work for credit) Date 1. Date 2. Date 3. Date 4. Date 5. Date 6. Date 7. Date 8. Acids, Bases, & Neutralization 2 Study Guide: Things You Must Know

More information

Aqueous solutions of acids have a sour Aqueous solutions of bases taste bitter

Aqueous solutions of acids have a sour Aqueous solutions of bases taste bitter Acid and Bases Exam Review Honors Chemistry 3 April 2012 Chapter 14- Acids and Bases Section 14.1- Acid and Base Properties List five general properties of aqueous acids and bases Properties of Acids Properties

More information

Chapter 10. Acids, Bases, and Salts

Chapter 10. Acids, Bases, and Salts Chapter 10 Acids, Bases, and Salts Topics we ll be looking at in this chapter Arrhenius theory of acids and bases Bronsted-Lowry acid-base theory Mono-, di- and tri-protic acids Strengths of acids and

More information

Ch 18 Acids and Bases Big Idea: Acids and Bases can be defined in terms of hydrogen ions and hydroxide ions or in terms of electron pairs.

Ch 18 Acids and Bases Big Idea: Acids and Bases can be defined in terms of hydrogen ions and hydroxide ions or in terms of electron pairs. Ch 18 Acids and Bases Big Idea: Acids and Bases can be defined in terms of hydrogen ions and hydroxide ions or in terms of electron pairs. Ch 18 - Acids and Bases I CAN: 1) Compare properties of acids

More information

AP Chemistry. CHAPTER 17- Buffers and Ksp 17.1 The Common Ion Effect Buffered Solutions. Composition and Action of Buffered Solutions

AP Chemistry. CHAPTER 17- Buffers and Ksp 17.1 The Common Ion Effect Buffered Solutions. Composition and Action of Buffered Solutions AP Chemistry CHAPTER 17- Buffers and Ksp 17.1 The Common Ion Effect The dissociation of a weak electrolyte is decreased by the addition of a strong electrolyte that has an ion in common with the weak electrolyte.

More information

C) SO 4 H H. C) The N-atom is the Lewis base because it accepted a pair of electrons to form the

C) SO 4 H H. C) The N-atom is the Lewis base because it accepted a pair of electrons to form the AP Chemistry Test (Chapters 14 and 15) 1) Which one would hydrolyze water the most? A) Ca 2+ B) NO 3 - C) SO 4 2- H H D) CN - 2) Which one is true about the compound? H B-N H A) The N-atom is the Lewis

More information

Example 15.1 Identifying Brønsted Lowry Acids and Bases and Their Conjugates

Example 15.1 Identifying Brønsted Lowry Acids and Bases and Their Conjugates Example 15.1 Identifying Brønsted Lowry Acids and Bases and Their Conjugates For Practice 15.1 In each reaction, identify the Brønsted Lowry acid, the Brønsted Lowry base, the conjugate acid, and the conjugate

More information

Acids and Bases. Reviewing Vocabulary CHAPTER ASSESSMENT CHAPTER 19. Compare and contrast each of the following terms.

Acids and Bases. Reviewing Vocabulary CHAPTER ASSESSMENT CHAPTER 19. Compare and contrast each of the following terms. Acids and Bases Reviewing Vocabulary Compare and contrast each of the following terms. 1. Arrhenius model, Brønsted-Lowry model 2. acid ionization constant, base ionization constant 3. conjugate acid,

More information

Acids and Bases. Chapter 15. Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.

Acids and Bases. Chapter 15. Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Acids and Bases Chapter 15 Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Acids Have a sour taste. Vinegar owes its taste to acetic acid. Citrus fruits contain

More information

Acids and bases, as we use them in the lab, are usually aqueous solutions. Ex: when we talk about hydrochloric acid, it is actually hydrogen chloride

Acids and bases, as we use them in the lab, are usually aqueous solutions. Ex: when we talk about hydrochloric acid, it is actually hydrogen chloride Acids and Bases Acids and bases, as we use them in the lab, are usually aqueous solutions. Ex: when we talk about hydrochloric acid, it is actually hydrogen chloride gas dissolved in water HCl (aq) Concentrated

More information

IB Chemistry ABS Introduction An acid was initially considered a substance that would produce H + ions in water.

IB Chemistry ABS Introduction An acid was initially considered a substance that would produce H + ions in water. IB Chemistry ABS Introduction An acid was initially considered a substance that would produce H + ions in water. The Brønsted-Lowry definition of an acid is a species that can donate an H + ion to any

More information

Chapter 16 - Acids and Bases

Chapter 16 - Acids and Bases Chapter 16 - Acids and Bases 16.1 Acids and Bases: The Brønsted Lowry Model 16.2 ph and the Autoionization of Water 16.3 Calculations Involving ph, K a and K b 16.4 Polyprotic Acids 16.1 Acids and Bases:

More information

Unit 4 Toxins, Section IV, L17-22

Unit 4 Toxins, Section IV, L17-22 Unit 4 Toxins, Section IV, L17-22 Lesson 17 Heartburn Lesson 18 Pass the Proton Lesson 19 phooey! Lesson 20 Watered Down Lesson 21 Neutral Territory Lesson 22 Drip Drop Acids and Bases What are the properties

More information

Chemistry 400 Homework #3, Chapter 16: Acid-Base Equilibria

Chemistry 400 Homework #3, Chapter 16: Acid-Base Equilibria Chemistry 400 Homework #3, Chapter 16: Acid-Base Equilibria I. Multiple Choice (for those with an asterisk, you must show work) These multiple choice (MC) are not "Google-proof", but they were so good

More information

UNIT #11: Acids and Bases ph and poh Neutralization Reactions Oxidation and Reduction

UNIT #11: Acids and Bases ph and poh Neutralization Reactions Oxidation and Reduction NAME: UNIT #11: Acids and Bases ph and poh Neutralization Reactions Oxidation and Reduction 1. SELF-IONIZATION OF WATER a) Water molecules collide, causing a very small number to ionize in a reversible

More information

Chapter 16. Acid-Base Equilibria

Chapter 16. Acid-Base Equilibria Chapter 16 Acid-Base Equilibria Arrhenius Definition Acids produce hydrogen ions in aqueous solution. Bases produce hydroxide ions when dissolved in water. Limits to aqueous solutions. Only one kind of

More information

Acids & Bases. Strong Acids. Weak Acids. Strong Bases. Acetic Acid. Arrhenius Definition: Classic Definition of Acids and Bases.

Acids & Bases. Strong Acids. Weak Acids. Strong Bases. Acetic Acid. Arrhenius Definition: Classic Definition of Acids and Bases. Arrhenius Definition: Classic Definition of Acids and Bases Acid: A substance that increases the hydrogen ion concetration, [H ], (also thought of as hydronium ion, H O ) when dissolved in water. Acids

More information

ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIA. Chapter 16

ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIA. Chapter 16 P a g e 1 Chapter 16 ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIA Nature of Acids and Bases Before we formally define acids and bases, let s examine their properties. Properties of Acids Sour taste Ability to dissolve many metals

More information

Unit 9: Acid and Base Multiple Choice Practice

Unit 9: Acid and Base Multiple Choice Practice Unit 9: Acid and Base Multiple Choice Practice Name June 14, 2017 1. Consider the following acidbase equilibrium: HCO3 H2O H2CO3 OH In the reaction above, the BrönstedLowry acids are: A. H2O and OH B.

More information

What are Acids and Bases? What are some common acids you know? What are some common bases you know? Where is it common to hear about ph balanced

What are Acids and Bases? What are some common acids you know? What are some common bases you know? Where is it common to hear about ph balanced What are Acids and Bases? What are some common acids you know? What are some common bases you know? Where is it common to hear about ph balanced materials? Historically, classified by their observable

More information

Worksheet 4.1 Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs

Worksheet 4.1 Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs Worksheet 4.1 Conjugate AcidBase Pairs 1. List five properties of acids that are in your textbook. Acids conduct electricity, taste sour, neutralize bases, change the color of indicators, and react with

More information

Chapter 8 Acid-Base Equilibria

Chapter 8 Acid-Base Equilibria Chapter 8 Acid-Base Equilibria 8-1 Brønsted-Lowry Acids and Bases 8-2 Water and the ph Scale 8-3 The Strengths of Acids and Bases 8-4 Equilibria Involving Weak Acids and Bases 8-5 Buffer Solutions 8-6

More information

CHEMISTRY. Chapter 16 Acid-Base Equilibria

CHEMISTRY. Chapter 16 Acid-Base Equilibria CHEMISTRY The Central Science 8 th Edition Chapter 16 Acid-Base Equilibria Kozet YAPSAKLI Why study acids bases? bases are common in the everyday world as well as in the lab. Some common acidic products

More information

Chapter 14 Acid- Base Equilibria Study Guide

Chapter 14 Acid- Base Equilibria Study Guide Chapter 14 Acid- Base Equilibria Study Guide This chapter will illustrate the chemistry of acid- base reactions and equilibria, and provide you with tools for quantifying the concentrations of acids and

More information

Acid-Base Equilibria. 1.NH 4 Cl 2.NaCl 3.KC 2 H 3 O 2 4.NaNO 2. Solutions of a Weak Acid or Base

Acid-Base Equilibria. 1.NH 4 Cl 2.NaCl 3.KC 2 H 3 O 2 4.NaNO 2. Solutions of a Weak Acid or Base Acid-Base Equilibria 1 Will the following salts be acidic, basic or neutral in aqueous solution? 1.NH 4 Cl.NaCl.KC H O 4.NaNO A = acidic B = basic C = neutral Solutions of a Weak Acid or Base The simplest

More information

Chapter 6. Acids, Bases, and Acid-Base Reactions

Chapter 6. Acids, Bases, and Acid-Base Reactions Chapter 6 Acids, Bases, and Acid-Base Reactions Chapter Map Arrhenius Acid Definition Anacid is a substance that generates hydronium ions, H 3 O + (often described as H + ), when added to water. An acidic

More information

11/14/10. Properties of Acids! CHAPTER 15 Acids and Bases. Table 18.1

11/14/10. Properties of Acids! CHAPTER 15 Acids and Bases. Table 18.1 11/14/10 CHAPTER 15 Acids and Bases 15-1 Properties of Acids! Sour taste React with active metals i.e., Al, Zn, Fe, but not Cu, Ag, or Au 2 Al + 6 HCl 2 AlCl3 + 3 H2 corrosive React with carbonates, producing

More information

Acids and Bases Written Response

Acids and Bases Written Response Acids and Bases Written Response January 1999 4. Consider the salt sodium oxalate, Na2C2O4. a) Write the dissociation equation for sodium oxalate. (1 mark) b) A 1.0M solution of sodium oxalate turns pink

More information

Acid-Base Equilibria. 1.NH 4 Cl 2.NaCl 3.KC 2 H 3 O 2 4.NaNO 2. Acid-Ionization Equilibria. Acid-Ionization Equilibria

Acid-Base Equilibria. 1.NH 4 Cl 2.NaCl 3.KC 2 H 3 O 2 4.NaNO 2. Acid-Ionization Equilibria. Acid-Ionization Equilibria Acid-Ionization Equilibria Acid-Base Equilibria Acid ionization (or acid dissociation) is the reaction of an acid with water to produce hydronium ion (hydrogen ion) and the conjugate base anion. (See Animation:

More information

THE BIG IDEA: REACTIONS. 1. Review nomenclature rules for acids and bases and the formation of acids and bases from anhydrides. (19.

THE BIG IDEA: REACTIONS. 1. Review nomenclature rules for acids and bases and the formation of acids and bases from anhydrides. (19. HONORS CHEMISTRY - CHAPTER 19 ACIDS, BASES, AND SALTS OBJECTIVES AND NOTES - V14 NAME: DATE: PAGE: THE BIG IDEA: REACTIONS Essential Questions 1. What are the different ways chemists define acids and bases?

More information

Chapter 14 Acids and Bases

Chapter 14 Acids and Bases Chapter 14 Acids and Bases General Properties of Acids 1. An acid tastes sour - acidus = Latin, sour; acetum= Latin, vinegar 2. An acid turns indicator dye litmus from blue to red. 3. An acid reacts with

More information

Acid-base Chemistry. Unit 11.1: Into to acid base chemistry. Unit 11. Name:

Acid-base Chemistry. Unit 11.1: Into to acid base chemistry. Unit 11. Name: Name: Acid-base Chemistry Unit 11 ( F i ve cla s s peri o ds) Unit 11.1: Into to acid base chemistry 1) Self-ionization of water a) Water molecules collide and the extremely electronegative oxygen can

More information

Chemistry SAT II Review Page 1

Chemistry SAT II Review Page 1 Chemistry SAT II Review Page 1 Acids and Bases Properties of acids and bases are caused by ions 1. Hydronium ions (H 3 O + ) cause acid properties 2. Hydroxide ions (OH ) cause base properties Water -

More information

Aqueous Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry (continuation)

Aqueous Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry (continuation) Aqueous Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry (continuation) 1. Electrolytes and non-electrolytes 2. Determining Moles of Ions in Aqueous Solutions of Ionic Compounds 3. Acids and Bases 4. Acid Strength

More information

Duncan. UNIT 14 - Acids & Bases. COMMON ACIDS NOTES lactic acetic phosphoric NAMING ACIDS NOTES

Duncan. UNIT 14 - Acids & Bases. COMMON ACIDS NOTES lactic acetic phosphoric NAMING ACIDS NOTES COMMON ACIDS NOTES lactic acetic phosphoric citric malic PROPERTIES OF ACIDS 1. 1. PROPERTIES OF BASES 2. 2. 3. 3. 4. 4. 5. 5. NAMING ACIDS NOTES Binary acids (H + one element) 1. hydro- - HF 2. root of

More information

Unit Nine Notes N C U9

Unit Nine Notes N C U9 Unit Nine Notes N C U9 I. AcidBase Theories A. Arrhenius Acids and Bases 1. Acids contain hydronium ions (H O ) commonly referred to as hydrogen ions (H ) that dissociate in water a. Different acids release

More information

Part 01 - Assignment: Introduction to Acids &Bases

Part 01 - Assignment: Introduction to Acids &Bases Part 01 - Assignment: Introduction to Acids &Bases Classify the following acids are monoprotic, diprotic, or triprotic by writing M, D, or T, respectively. 1. HCl 2. HClO4 3. H3As 4. H2SO4 5. H2S 6. H3PO4

More information

Equations. M = n/v. M 1 V 1 = M 2 V 2 if the moles are the same n 1 n 2 you can cancel out the n s. ph = -log [H + ] poh = -log [OH - ] ph + poh = 14

Equations. M = n/v. M 1 V 1 = M 2 V 2 if the moles are the same n 1 n 2 you can cancel out the n s. ph = -log [H + ] poh = -log [OH - ] ph + poh = 14 Equations M = n/v M 1 V 1 = M 2 V 2 if the moles are the same n 1 n 2 you can cancel out the n s. ph = -log [H + ] poh = -log [OH - ] ph + poh = 14 [H 3 O + ] = 10^-pH [OH - ] = 10^-pOH [H 3 O + ] [OH

More information

UNIT 14 - Acids & Bases

UNIT 14 - Acids & Bases COMMON ACIDS NOTES lactic sour milk, sore muscles acetic vinegar phosphoric soft drinks citric citrus fruits malic apples PROPERTIES OF ACIDS PROPERTIES OF BASES 1. Taste sour 1. Taste bitter 2. react

More information

8.1 Explaining the Properties of Acids & Bases. SCH4U - Chemistry, Gr. 12, University Prep

8.1 Explaining the Properties of Acids & Bases. SCH4U - Chemistry, Gr. 12, University Prep 8.1 Explaining the Properties of Acids & Bases SCH4U - Chemistry, Gr. 12, University Prep Equilibrium & Acids & Bases 2 So far, we have looked at equilibrium of general chemical systems: We learned about

More information

Chapter 17 Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria (Part A)

Chapter 17 Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria (Part A) Chapter 17 Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria (Part A) Often, there are many equilibria going on in an aqueous solution. So, we must determine the dominant equilibrium (i.e. the equilibrium reaction

More information

Chemistry 102 Chapter 17 COMMON ION EFFECT

Chemistry 102 Chapter 17 COMMON ION EFFECT COMMON ION EFFECT Common ion effect is the shift in equilibrium caused by the addition of an ion that takes part in the equilibrium. For example, consider the effect of adding HCl to a solution of acetic

More information