Chapter 18. The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity. Lecture by Joan Sharp

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Chapter 18. The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity. Lecture by Joan Sharp"

Transcription

1 Chapter 18 The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity PowerPoint Lectures for Biology: Concepts & Connections, Sixth Edition Campbell, Reece, Taylor, Simon, and Dickey Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Lecture by Joan Sharp

2 Introduction: Fatal or Fake? The mimic octopus can look like a highly venomous sea snake, a toxic flatfish, a sea anemone, or a jellyfish Many animals have antipredator defenses such as mimicry, but only the mimic octopus can mimic multiple toxic animals Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

3

4

5

6

7 ANIMAL EVOLUTION AND DIVERSITY Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

8 18.1 What is an animal? Animals are eukaryotic, multicellular heterotrophs that ingest their food Animal cells lack cell walls Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

9

10 18.1 What is an animal? Most adult animals are diploid, producing shortlived gametes by meiosis Two gametes fuse to produce a diploid zygote, which grows to maturity by mitosis The life cycle of most animals includes a blastula, gastrula, and larval stage Hox genes control transformation of the zygote into an adult animal Video: Sea Urchin Embryonic Development Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

11 Egg Sperm 1 Meiosis Key Haploid (n) Diploid (2n) Adult

12 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Diploid (2n) Meiosis Adult Zygote (fertilized egg)

13 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Meiosis Zygote (fertilized egg) 3 Diploid (2n) Adult Eight-cell stage

14 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Meiosis Zygote (fertilized egg) 3 Diploid (2n) Adult Eight-cell stage Blastula (cross section) 4

15 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Meiosis Zygote (fertilized egg) 3 Diploid (2n) Adult Eight-cell stage Blastula (cross section) 4 5 Early gastrula (cross section)

16 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Meiosis Zygote (fertilized egg) 3 Diploid (2n) Adult Eight-cell stage Blastula (cross section) 4 Ectoderm 5 Endoderm Internal sac Later gastrula (cross section) 6 Early gastrula (cross section) Future mesoderm

17 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Meiosis Zygote (fertilized egg) 3 Diploid (2n) Adult Eight-cell stage Digestive tract Blastula (cross section) 4 Larva Ectoderm 5 7 Endoderm Internal sac Later gastrula (cross section) 6 Early gastrula (cross section) Future mesoderm

18 Egg Sperm 2 1 Key Haploid (n) Meiosis Zygote (fertilized egg) 3 Diploid (2n) 8 Adult Eight-cell stage Metamorphosis Digestive tract Blastula (cross section) 4 Larva Ectoderm 5 7 Endoderm Internal sac Later gastrula (cross section) 6 Early gastrula (cross section) Future mesoderm

19 Somatic cells Digestive cavity Reproductive cells Colonial protist, an aggregate of identical cells Hollow sphere of unspecialized cells Beginning of cell specialization Infolding Gastrula-like proto-animal

20 18.2 The ancestor of animals was probably a colonial, flagellated protist 542 million years ago, an adaptive radiation known as the Cambrian explosion produced a varied and complex animal fauna Many animal plans and new phyla appeared in a short time span Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

21

22 18.2 The ancestor of animals was probably a colonial, flagellated protist What explains the Cambrian explosion? Ecological causes: The evolution of hard body coverings led to increasingly complex predator-prey relationships and diverse adaptations for feeding, motility, and protection Geological causes: Atmospheric oxygen reached a high enough concentration to support the metabolism of more active, mobile animals Genetic causes: The genetic framework for complex bodies was already in place in the Hox complex of regulatory genes; variation in these genes produced animal diversity Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

23 18.3 Animals can be characterized by basic features of their body plan Animal body plans vary in symmetry, body cavity, and number of germ layers With radial symmetry, any slice through the central axis divides the animal into mirror image halves A radially symmetrical animal has a top and bottom but lacks back and front or right and left sides Animals with bilateral symmetry have mirror-image right and left sides, a distinct head and tail, and a back (dorsal) and belly (ventral) surface Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

24 Top Dorsal surface Anterior end Posterior end Bottom Ventral surface

25 18.3 Animals can be characterized by basic features of their body plan Animal body plans vary in organization of tissues Sponges lack true tissues In other animals, cell layers formed during gastrulation give rise to tissues and organs Some animals have only ectoderm and endoderm, but most animals also have mesoderm Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

26 18.3 Animals can be characterized by basic features of their body plan The body cavities of animals vary Flatworms have a solid body and lack a coelom A pseudocoelom is partially lined by tissue derived from mesoderm A true coelom is completely lined by tissue derived from mesoderm Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

27 Body covering (from ectoderm) Tissue-filled region (from mesoderm) Digestive sac (from endoderm)

28 Body covering (from ectoderm) Muscle layer (from mesoderm) Digestive tract (from endoderm) Pseudocoelom

29 Coelom Body covering (from ectoderm) Digestive tract (from endoderm) Tissue layer lining coelom and suspending internal organs (from mesoderm)

30 18.4 The body plans of animals can be used to build phylogenetic trees A phylogenetic tree is a hypothesis for the evolutionary history of the groups involved This phylogenetic tree is based on comparative morphology of animal taxa Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

31 No true tissues Sponges Radial symmetry Cnidarians Ancestral colonial protist True tissues Eumetazoans Bilateral symmetry Bilaterians Deuterostomes Protostomes Echinoderms Chordates Flatworms Molluscs Annelids Arthropods Nematodes

32 INVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

33 18.5 Sponges have a relatively simple, porous body Sponges (phylum Porifera) are simple, sedentary animals without true tissues Water is drawn in through pores in the body wall into a central cavity, and then flows out through a larger opening The body of a sponge consists of two layers of cells separated by a gelatinous region The inner layer of flagellated choanocytes filters food and engulfs it by phagocytosis Amoebocytes wander through the middle body region and produce skeletal fibers Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

34

35

36

37 Pores Amoebocyte Choanocyte Skeletal fiber Water flow Central cavity Flagella Choanocyte in contact with an amoebocyte

38 18.5 Sponges have a relatively simple, porous body Sponges are suspension feeders, filtering food particles from water passed through food-trapping equipment To grow by 100 g, a sponge must filter 1,000 kg of water Adult sponges are sessile and cannot escape from predators They produce defensive toxins and antibiotics that deter pathogens, parasites, and predators Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

39 18.6 Cnidarians are radial animals with tentacles and stinging cells Cnidarians (phylum Cnidaria) have two tissue layers: an outer epidermis and an inner cell layer lining the digestive cavity A jelly-filled middle region may have scattered amoeboid cells Cnidarians use tentacles to capture prey and push them into their mouths The mouth leads to the gastrovascular cavity, which functions in digestion and circulation and as a hydrostatic skeleton Cnidocytes on tentacles sting prey and function in defense Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

40 18.6 Cnidarians are radial animals with tentacles and stinging cells Cnidarians have two kinds of radially symmetrical body forms polyp and medusa Some cnidarians have alternating polyp and medusa forms in their life cycle, while others exist only as polyp or medusa forms Video: Hydra Budding Video: Hydra Eating Daphnia (time lapse) Video: Thimble Jellies Video: Hydra Releasing Sperm Video: Clownfish and Anemone Video: Jelly Swimming Video: Coral Reef Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

41

42

43

44 Tentacle Capsule (nematocyst) Coiled thread Trigger Discharge of thread Prey Cnidocyte

45 18.7 Flatworms are the simplest bilateral animals Flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) are the simplest bilateral animals There are three major groups of flatworms Free-living flatworms (planarians) have heads with light-sensitive eyespots and flaps to detect chemicals Dense clusters of nerve cells form a simple brain, and a pair of nerve cords runs the length of the body Planarians have a branched gastrovascular cavity with a single opening Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

46 Gastrovascular cavity Nerve cords Mouth Eyespots Nervous tissue clusters Bilateral symmetry

47 18.7 Flatworms are the simplest bilateral animals Flukes and tapeworms are parasitic flatworms with complex life cycles Flukes live as parasites, with suckers to attach to their hosts Tapeworms inhabit the digestive tracts of vertebrates They consist of a ribbon-like body with repeated units The anterior scolex is armed with hooks and suckers for attachment, while posterior units are full of eggs and sperm Tapeworms lack a digestive tract and absorb nutrients from the intestines of their hosts Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

48 Units with reproductive structures Hooks Sucker Scolex (anterior end)

49 18.8 Nematodes have a pseudocoelom and a complete digestive tract Roundworms (phylum Nematoda) have bilateral symmetry and three tissue layers They are abundant and diverse, with an estimated 500,000 species The body cavity is a pseudocoelom, which functions to distribute nutrients and as a hydroskeleton The complete digestive tract has a mouth and anus Humans host at least 50 species of nematodes Video: C. elegans Crawling Video: C. elegans Embryo Development (time lapse) Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

50 Mouth

51

52 18.9 Diverse molluscs are variations on a common body plan Molluscs (phylum Mollusca) have a true coelom and a circulatory system Many molluscs feed with a rasping radula, used to scrape up food All molluscs have A muscular foot that functions in locomotion A visceral mass containing most of the internal organs A mantle, which may secrete a shell that encloses the visceral mass Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

53 Visceral mass Mantle cavity Mantle Coelom Kidney Heart Reproductive organs Digestive tract Shell Radula Digestive tract Radula Anus Mouth Gill Mouth Foot Nerve cords

54 Mouth Anus

55 18.9 Diverse molluscs are variations on a common body plan Gastropods are the largest group of molluscs and include the snails and slugs Most snails are protected by a single, spiral shell In land snails, the lining of the mantle cavity functions as a lung Slugs have lost their mantle and shell and have long colorful projections that function as gills Video: Nudibranchs Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

56

57

58 18.9 Diverse molluscs are variations on a common body plan Bivalves have shells divided into two halves that are hinged together Bivalves include clams, oysters, mussels, and scallops Most bivalves are sedentary suspension feeders, attached to the substrate by strong threads Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

59 Eyes

60

61 18.9 Diverse molluscs are variations on a common body plan Cephalopods are fast, agile predators and include squids and octopuses Cephalopods have large brains and sophisticated sense organs, including complex image-focusing eyes In most cephalopods, the shell is small and internal (squid) or missing (octopuses) Squid are fast, streamlined predators that use a muscular siphon for jet propulsion Octopuses live on the seafloor, where they creep about in search of food Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

62

63 18.10 Annelids are segmented worms Annelids (phylum Annelida) have a closed circulatory system in which blood is enclosed in vessels Their nervous system includes a simple brain and ventral nerve cord with cluster of nerve cells in each segment The true coelom functions as hydrostatic skeleton Earthworms ingest soil and extract nutrients, aerating soil and improving its texture Video: Tubeworms Video: Earthworm Locomotion Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

64 Anus Circular muscle Epidermis Segment wall (partition between segments) Segment wall Brain Mucus-secreting organ Dorsal blood vessel Coelom Digestive tract Bristles Excretory organ Segment wall Longitudinal muscle Dorsal blood vessel Intestine Nerve cord Excretory organ Bristles Ventral blood vessel Ventral blood vessel Mouth Pumping segmental vessels Nerve cord Giant Australian earthworm

65 Anus Segment wall Mucus-secreting organ Bristles Brain Dorsal blood vessel Coelom Digestive tract Excretory organ Segment wall Ventral blood vessel Mouth Nerve cord Pumping segmental vessels

66 Circular muscle Epidermis Segment wall (partition between segments) Longitudinal muscle Dorsal blood vessel Excretory organ Intestine Nerve cord Bristles Ventral blood vessel

67 Giant Australian earthworm

68 18.10 Annelids are segmented worms Polychaetes are the largest group of annelids Each polychaete segment has a pair of fleshy appendages with stiff bristles or chaetae Polychaetes search for prey on the seafloor or live in tubes and filter food particles Most leeches are free-living carnivores, but some suck blood Blood-sucking leeches use razor-like jaws, secrete an anesthetic and an anticoagulant, and suck up to 10 times their own weight in blood Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

69

70

71

72 18.11 Arthropods are segmented animals with jointed appendages and an exoskeleton There are over a million species of arthropods (phylum Arthropoda), including crayfish, lobsters, crabs, barnacles, spiders, ticks, and insects The diversity and success of arthropods are due to segmentation, a hard exoskeleton, and jointed appendages Arthropods have an open circulatory system The body of most arthropods includes a head, thorax, and abdomen Video: Lobster Mouth Parts Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

73 Cephalothorax Abdomen Head Thorax Antennae (sensory reception) Swimming appendages Walking legs Pincer (defense) Mouthparts (feeding)

74

75 18.11 Arthropods are segmented animals with jointed appendages and an exoskeleton Living arthropods represent four major lineages Chelicerates include horseshoe crabs and arachnids, such as spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks Most are terrestrial Scorpions are nocturnal hunters, while spiders hunt or trap prey during the day Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

76 A scorpion (about 8 cm long) A black widow spider (about 1 cm wide) A dust mite (about 420 m long)

77 A scorpion (about 8 cm long)

78 A black widow spider (about 1 cm wide)

79 A dust mite (about 420 m long)

80 18.11 Arthropods are segmented animals with jointed appendages and an exoskeleton Millipedes and centipedes are identified by the number of jointed legs per body segment 2 in herbivorous millipedes, 1 in carnivorous centipedes Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

81

82

83 18.11 Arthropods are segmented animals with jointed appendages and an exoskeleton Crustaceans are nearly all aquatic They include crabs, shrimps, and barnacles, which feed with jointed appendages Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

84

85 18.12 EVOLUTION CONNECTION: Insects are the most successful group of animals 70% of all animal species are insects There may be as many as 30 million insect species The body of an insect includes a head, thorax, and abdomen; three sets of legs; and (in most insects) wings Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

86 Head Thorax Abdomen Antenna Forewing Eye Mouthparts Hindwing

87 18.12 EVOLUTION CONNECTION: Insects are the most successful group of animals The success of insects is due to Body segmentation An exoskeleton Jointed appendages Flight A waterproof cuticle A complex life cycle with short generations and large numbers of offspring Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

88 18.12 EVOLUTION CONNECTION: Insects are the most successful group of animals Insect life cycles Many insects undergo incomplete or complete metamorphosis, with different body forms specialized for different roles Larval stage is specialized for eating and growing Adult stage is specialized for reproduction and dispersal Video: Butterfly Emerging Video: Bee Pollinating Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

89

90

91

92

93 18.12 EVOLUTION CONNECTION: Insects are the most successful group of animals Modular body plan of insects Homeotic genes act to modify the structure of insect segments and their appendages Insect mouthparts are adapted for various types of feeding, such as chewing (grasshoppers), biting and tearing prey (mantids), lapping up fluids (houseflies), piercing and sucking fluids of plants (aphids) and animals (mosquitoes) Insects have three pairs of legs, which are adapted for walking, jumping, grasping prey, digging in soil, or paddling on water Most adult insects have one or two pairs of wings, allowing dispersal and escape from predators Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

94 18.12 EVOLUTION CONNECTION: Insects are the most successful group of animals Protective color patterns Many insects have protective color patterns and disguises, including modifications to antennae, wings, and bodies Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

95

96

97

98

99

100

101

102

103 18.13 Echinoderms have spiny skin, an endoskeleton, and a water vascular system for movement Echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata) include slow-moving or sessile radially symmetrical organisms such as sea stars and sea urchins The water vascular system has water-filled canals branching into tube feet, which are used for respiration, feeding, and locomotion Echinoderms have an endoskeleton of hard calcareous plates under a thin skin Echinoderms and chordates belong to a clade of bilateral animals called deuterostomes Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

104 18.13 Echinoderms have spiny skin, an endoskeleton, and a water vascular system for movement Video: Echinoderm Tube Feet Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

105 Anus Spines Stomach Tube feet Canals

106 Tube foot

107 Tube feet Spines

108 18.14 Our own phylum, Chordata, is distinguished by four features Chordates (phylum Chordata) have A dorsal hollow nerve cord A flexible, supportive notochord Pharyngeal slits A muscular post-anal tail Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

109 18.14 Our own phylum, Chordata, is distinguished by four features The simplest chordates are tunicates and lancelets, which use their pharyngeal slits for suspension feeding Adult tunicates are stationary and attached, while the tunicate larva is a tadpole-like organism Tunicates represent the deepest branch of the chordate lineage Lancelets are small, bladelike chordates that live in marine sands Lancelets are the closest living relatives of vertebrates Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

110 Excurrent siphon Post-anal tail Dorsal, hollow nerve cord Mouth Pharyngeal slits Muscle segments Adult (about 3 cm high) Notochord Larva

111 Post-anal tail Dorsal, hollow nerve cord Mouth Pharyngeal slits Muscle segments Notochord Larva

112 Head Mouth Notochord Pharynx Pharyngeal slits Digestive tract Water exit Segmental muscles Anus Dorsal, hollow nerve cord Post-anal tail

113 Head Mouth Notochord Pharynx Pharyngeal slits Digestive tract Water exit Segmental muscles Anus Dorsal, hollow nerve cord Post-anal tail

114 ANIMAL PHYLOGENY AND DIVERSITY REVISITED Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

115 18.15 An animal phylogenetic tree is a work in progress This phylogenetic tree is based on molecular data Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

116 No true tissues Sponges Ancestral colonial protist Radial symmetry Cnidarians True tissues Eumetazoans Bilateral symmetry Bilaterians Deuterostomes Lophotrochozoans Echinoderms Chordates Flatworms Molluscs Annelids Ecdysozoans Nematodes Arthropods

117 18.16 TALKING ABOUT SCIENCE: Sean Carroll talks about the evolution of animal diversity Sean Carroll, a pioneer in the new field of evolutionary developmental biology, has said: The genes that build the bodies and body parts and organs of fruit flies are shared with us and with virtually every other animal in the kingdom. Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

118

119 No true tissues Sponges Radial symmetry Cnidarians Ancestral colonial protist True tissues Eumetazoans Bilateral symmetry Bilaterians Deuterostomes Protostomes Echinoderms Chordates Flatworms Molluscs Annelids Arthropods Nematodes

120 No true tissues Ancestral colonial protist True tissues Radial symmetry Eumetazoans Bilateral symmetry Bilaterians Deuterostomes Lophotrochozoans Sponges Cnidarians Echinoderms Chordates Flatworms Molluscs Annelids Ecdysozoans Arthropods Nematodes

121

122 You should now be able to 1. Describe the defining characteristics of animals 2. Describe the general animal life cycle and the basic body plan 3. Describe the Cambrian explosion and explain two hypotheses to explain its occurrence 4. Explain how a hydrostatic skeleton helps an animal move and keep its shape Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

123 You should now be able to 5. Compare the nine animal phyla discussed in this chapter with respect to the following traits: (a) presence of true tissues; (b) no symmetry, radial symmetry, or bilateral symmetry; (c) no coelom, a pseudocoelom, or a true coelom; and (d) protostome or deuterostome 6. Define segmentation, explain its functions, and note the animal phyla where it occurs 7. Compare the characteristics of the four major arthropod lineages; note examples of each Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

124 You should now be able to 8. Describe the common characteristics of insects 9. Describe the process and significance of complete metamorphosis 10. Compare the phylogenetic relationships shown in Figures 18.4 and 18.15, noting similarities and differences Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

INVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY

INVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY INVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY 1 INVERTEBRATES Animals that lack a backbone Invertebrates 2 1 ANIMAL DEVELOPMENT Meiosis Egg Sperm Zygote Adult Blastula hollow ball of cells in a developing animal Gastrula Stage

More information

Invertebrate Diversity

Invertebrate Diversity CHAPTER 23 Invertebrate Diversity Summary of Key Concepts Concept 23.1 Diverse animals share several key characteristics. (pp. 494 496) More than a million living species of animals are organized into

More information

Chapter 18 ANIMAL EVOLUTION AND DIVERSITY. Introduction What is an animal? The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity

Chapter 18 ANIMAL EVOLUTION AND DIVERSITY. Introduction What is an animal? The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity Chapter 18 The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity Introduction Most octopuses rely on nonaggressive defense mechanisms such as camouflage. The blue-ringed octopus is an exception, with a toxin 10,000

More information

KINGDOM ANIMALIA CHARACTERISTICS

KINGDOM ANIMALIA CHARACTERISTICS KINGDOM ANIMALIA CHARACTERISTICS EUKARYOTIC MULTICELLULAR HETEROTROPHIC (by ingestion) MOVE AT SOME POINT IN LIFE (not all - sponges are sessile) DIGEST FOOD TO GET NUTRIENTS LACK CELL WALLS CHARACTERISTICS

More information

BIOLOGY. An Introduction to Invertebrates CAMPBELL. Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson

BIOLOGY. An Introduction to Invertebrates CAMPBELL. Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson CAMPBELL BIOLOGY TENTH EDITION Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson 33 An Introduction to Invertebrates Lecture Presentation by Nicole Tunbridge and Kathleen Fitzpatrick Figure 33.UN08 Metazoa Eumetazoa

More information

Introduction to Animals

Introduction to Animals Introduction to Animals Moving Forward Quizlet Each section we cover, 1 group will go to our class on Quizlet and create 20 flash cards on the topic (/5mks) If I warn you about talking while I m talking,

More information

Life Science 7 th NOTES: Ch Animals Invertebrates

Life Science 7 th NOTES: Ch Animals Invertebrates Life Science 7 th NOTES: Ch 10-11 Animals Invertebrates Write the correct word in the blanks to show directions on an animal body: ** Word Bank (Posterior, Ventral, Dorsal, Anterior) top surface front

More information

A. Incorrect! Sponges are mostly marine animals. This is a feature of sponges.

A. Incorrect! Sponges are mostly marine animals. This is a feature of sponges. College Biology - Problem Drill 15: The Evolution of Animal Diversity Question No. 1 of 10 1. Which is not a feature of the phyla porifera- sponges? Question #01 (A) Most are marine animals. (B) They have

More information

Introduction to Animal Kingdom. Invertebrates and Vertebrates

Introduction to Animal Kingdom. Invertebrates and Vertebrates Introduction to Animal Kingdom Invertebrates and Vertebrates Introduction To Animals Vertebrate animal with a backbone. Invertebrate animal without a backbone; includes more than 95% of all animal species

More information

BIOS1101 Lab Notes. Contents ANIMALS. Lab 1: Animal Diversity invertebrates. Lab 2: Animal Diversity 2 vertebrates

BIOS1101 Lab Notes. Contents ANIMALS. Lab 1: Animal Diversity invertebrates. Lab 2: Animal Diversity 2 vertebrates Contents ANIMALS Lab 1: Animal Diversity invertebrates Lab 2: Animal Diversity 2 vertebrates Lab 3: Animal Structure 1 Gross morphology Lab 4: Animal Structure 2 Histology Lab 5: The Nervous System & Sensory

More information

Today: Animal Body Plans. Animal Body Plans: The Gut. The Animal Kingdom- General Characteristics: Animal Body Plans: Symmetry

Today: Animal Body Plans. Animal Body Plans: The Gut. The Animal Kingdom- General Characteristics: Animal Body Plans: Symmetry Today: Exploring the Animal Kingdom Introduction to Ecology The Animal Kingdom- General Characteristics: Multicellular Heterotrophic (via ingestion) Eukaryotes Require Oxygen for aerobic respiration Reproduce

More information

Animal Diversity. Features shared by all animals. Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from embryonic layers

Animal Diversity. Features shared by all animals. Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from embryonic layers Animal Diversity Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from embryonic layers Nutritional mode Ingest food and use enzymes in the body to digest Cell structure and

More information

What Is an Animal? Section 25.1 Typical Animal Characteristics. I. Characteristics of Animals. Biology II Mrs. Michaelsen

What Is an Animal? Section 25.1 Typical Animal Characteristics. I. Characteristics of Animals. Biology II Mrs. Michaelsen What Is an Animal? Section 25.1 Typical Animal Characteristics Biology II Mrs. Michaelsen I. Characteristics of Animals A. All animals are eukaryotic, multicellular, have ways of moving to reproduce, obtain

More information

23.1 Animal Characteristics EQ Although diverse, what common characteristics do all animal share?

23.1 Animal Characteristics EQ Although diverse, what common characteristics do all animal share? 23.1 Animal Characteristics EQ Although diverse, what common characteristics do all animal share? Sea Slug 23.1 Animal Characteristics Animals are the most physically diverse kingdom of organisms and all

More information

Characteristics of Animals

Characteristics of Animals Characteristics of Animals Multicellular Cellular Organization What is this? Heterotrophic Adaptations CHAPTER 9 Cellular Organization 4 Major Functions of Animals Obtain food and water Sustain metabolism

More information

The Evolution of Animal Diversity. Dr. Stephen J. Salek Biology 130 Fayetteville State University

The Evolution of Animal Diversity. Dr. Stephen J. Salek Biology 130 Fayetteville State University The Evolution of Animal Diversity Dr. Stephen J. Salek Biology 130 Fayetteville State University Create your own animal? Start with a basic plant. Make the plant into a simple animal such as a worm. Consider:

More information

An Introduction to Animal Diversity

An Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32 An Introduction to Animal Diversity PowerPoint Lectures for Biology, Seventh Edition Neil Campbell and Jane Reece Lectures by Chris Romero Overview: Welcome to Your Kingdom The animal kingdom

More information

8/23/2014. Introduction to Animal Diversity

8/23/2014. Introduction to Animal Diversity Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32 Objectives List the characteristics that combine to define animals Summarize key events of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras Distinguish between the

More information

Chapter 32 Introduction to Animal Diversity. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Benjamin Cummings

Chapter 32 Introduction to Animal Diversity. Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Benjamin Cummings Chapter 32 Introduction to Animal Diversity Welcome to Your Kingdom The animal kingdom extends far beyond humans and other animals we may encounter 1.3 million living species of animals have been identified

More information

Classification. The three-domains. The six-kingdom system. The traditional five-kingdom system. Bacteria Archaea Eukarya

Classification. The three-domains. The six-kingdom system. The traditional five-kingdom system. Bacteria Archaea Eukarya Classification The three-domains Bacteria Archaea Eukarya The six-kingdom system Bacteria Archaea Protista Plantae Fungi Animalia The traditional five-kingdom system Monera Protista Plantae Fungi Animalia

More information

v Scientists have identified 1.3 million living species of animals v The definition of an animal

v Scientists have identified 1.3 million living species of animals v The definition of an animal Biosc 41 9/10 Announcements BIOSC 041 v Genetics review: group problem sets Groups of 3-4 Correct answer presented to class = 2 pts extra credit Incorrect attempt = 1 pt extra credit v Lecture: Animal

More information

Eukaryote Phylogeny. Glycogen. Kingdom Animalia. Amoebozoa Animalia. Plantae. Chromalveolata Rhizaria. Fungi. Excavata

Eukaryote Phylogeny. Glycogen. Kingdom Animalia. Amoebozoa Animalia. Plantae. Chromalveolata Rhizaria. Fungi. Excavata Eukaryote Phylogeny most protozoans, brown algae, & water molds Excavata Chromalveolata Rhizaria Plantae Amoebozoa Animalia Fungi cpsts. w/ 2 memb. chitin, hyphae glycogen eukaryotic cells (nucleus, etc.)

More information

Biosc 41 9/10 Announcements

Biosc 41 9/10 Announcements Biosc 41 9/10 Announcements v Genetics review: group problem sets Groups of 3-4 Correct answer presented to class = 2 pts extra credit Incorrect attempt = 1 pt extra credit v Lecture: Animal Body Plans

More information

An Introduction to Animal Diversity

An Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32 An Introduction to Animal Diversity PowerPoint Lecture Presentations for Biology Eighth Edition Neil Campbell and Jane Reece Lectures by Chris Romero, updated by Erin Barley with contributions

More information

Outline. v Definition and major characteristics of animals v Dividing animals into groups based on: v Animal Phylogeny

Outline. v Definition and major characteristics of animals v Dividing animals into groups based on: v Animal Phylogeny BIOSC 041 Overview of Animal Diversity: Animal Body Plans Reference: Chapter 32 Outline v Definition and major characteristics of animals v Dividing animals into groups based on: Body symmetry Tissues

More information

Introduction to Animals

Introduction to Animals Introduction to Animals Characteristics of Animals multicellular Except for sponges, animal cells are arranged into tissues. Tissues are necessary to produce organs and organ systems. Tissues, organs,

More information

Animals are in Domain Eukarya

Animals are in Domain Eukarya The Diversity of Animals 1: invertebrates Chapter 23 Animals are in Domain Eukarya Immediate ancestors are a type of Protista Key features Multicellular Kingdom Animalia Heterotrophic: gain energy by consuming

More information

Guided Reading Activities

Guided Reading Activities Name Period Chapter 18: The Evolution of Invertebrate Diversity Guided Reading Activities Big idea: Animal evolution and diversity Answer the following questions as you read modules 18.1 18.4: 1. The eating

More information

Marine Invertebrates

Marine Invertebrates Name: Date: Period: Marine Invertebrates Porifera Annelida Cnidaria Mollusca Platyhelminthes Arthropoda Nematoda Echinodermata Name Class Date Section 26 2 Sponges (pages 664 667) This section explains

More information

An Introduction to Animal Diversity

An Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32 An Introduction to Animal Diversity PowerPoint Lecture Presentations for Biology Eighth Edition Neil Campbell and Jane Reece Lectures by Chris Romero, updated by Erin Barley with contributions

More information

Chapter 33: Invertebrates

Chapter 33: Invertebrates Name Period Chapters 31, 32, and 33 should be considered as a single unit, and you should try to put all of them together in a single conceptual framework. Due to the scope of our course, you are likely

More information

Sponges. What is the sponge s habitat. What level of organization do sponges have? Type of symmetry?

Sponges. What is the sponge s habitat. What level of organization do sponges have? Type of symmetry? Sponges What is the sponge s habitat Marine (few freshwater species) What level of organization do sponges have? Cell level Type of symmetry? None Type of digestive system (none, complete or incomplete)?

More information

Biology 11. The Kingdom Animalia

Biology 11. The Kingdom Animalia Biology 11 The Kingdom Animalia Objectives By the end of the lesson you should be able to: Describe the 5 ways we classify animals Symmetry Germ layers Body plan Segmentation Animal Evolution Hank Video

More information

Brief Introduction to the Animal Kingdom

Brief Introduction to the Animal Kingdom Brief Introduction to the Animal Kingdom Vocabulary Vertebrate Invertebrate Detritivore Asymmetry Bilateral symmetry Radial symmetry Cephalization Coelum Pseudocoelum Acoelomates Blastula Blastophore Protosome

More information

Animal Diversity. Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from embryonic layers 9/20/2017

Animal Diversity. Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from embryonic layers 9/20/2017 Animal Diversity Chapter 32 Which of these organisms are animals? Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from embryonic layers Animals share the same: Nutritional

More information

Kingdom Animalia. Special Features: Advanced nervous systems means cephalization (faces), brains, and efficient mobility (walk/run/swim/grab)

Kingdom Animalia. Special Features: Advanced nervous systems means cephalization (faces), brains, and efficient mobility (walk/run/swim/grab) Kingdom Animalia Kingdom Animalia Cell Number: Multicellular with extensive specialization Cell Type: Eukaryotic Animal Cells (no cell wall) Food: Heterotrophic Carnivore (meat), Herbivore (plants), Omnivore

More information

Resources. Visual Concepts. Chapter Presentation. Copyright by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.

Resources. Visual Concepts. Chapter Presentation. Copyright by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. Chapter Presentation Visual Concepts Transparencies Standardized Test Prep Introduction to Animals Table of Contents Section 2 Animal Body Systems Objectives Identify the features that animals have in

More information

Animal Origins and Evolution

Animal Origins and Evolution Animal Origins and Evolution Common Features of Animals multicellular heterotrophic motile Sexual reproduction, embryo Evolution of Animals All animals are multicellular and heterotrophic, which means

More information

Chapter 32, 10 th edition Q1.Which characteristic below is shared by plants, fungi, and animals? ( Concept 32.1)

Chapter 32, 10 th edition Q1.Which characteristic below is shared by plants, fungi, and animals? ( Concept 32.1) Chapter 32, 10 th edition Q1.Which characteristic below is shared by plants, fungi, and animals? ( Concept 32.1) A) They are multicellular eukaryotes. B) They are heterotrophs. C) Their cells are supported

More information

Biology 211 (1) Exam 2 Worksheet!

Biology 211 (1) Exam 2 Worksheet! Biology 211 (1) Exam 2 Worksheet Chapter 33 Introduction to Animal Diversity Kingdom Animalia: 1. Approximately how many different animal species are alive on Earth currently. How many those species have

More information

Tuesday February 26, 2013 Invertebrate Animals Animals: Multicellular, no cell wall or chlorophyll, eukaryotic, heterotrophs

Tuesday February 26, 2013 Invertebrate Animals Animals: Multicellular, no cell wall or chlorophyll, eukaryotic, heterotrophs Name: Class: Biology Weekly Packet February 25 th - March 1 st, 2013 Monday February 25, 2013 Catalyst Tuesday February 26, 2013 Invertebrate Animals Animals: Multicellular, no cell wall or chlorophyll,

More information

Kingdom Animalia. Zoology the study of animals

Kingdom Animalia. Zoology the study of animals Kingdom Animalia Zoology the study of animals Summary Animals are multicellular and eukaryotic. consume and digest organic materials thereby being heterotrophs. Most are motile at some time in their lives.

More information

Porifera Sponges Features:

Porifera Sponges Features: Porifera Sponges The Phylum Porifera consists only of sponges, which is unique since these animals are entirely aquatic; with 98% found only in marine environments and a small percentage found in freshwater

More information

Classification. Grouping & Identifying Living Things

Classification. Grouping & Identifying Living Things Classification Grouping & Identifying Living Things Classifying Living Things We put livings things into three Domains Eukarya Bacteria Archaea Which are divided into 6 Kingdoms Plant Animal Fungi Protist

More information

Chapter 24 Introduction to Animals

Chapter 24 Introduction to Animals 1 Chapter 24 Introduction to Animals I. Animal characteristics A. General Animal Features Multicellular B. Feeding and Digestion a. acquire nutrients from various sources obtaining nutrients unique to

More information

Intro to Animals. Chapter 32

Intro to Animals. Chapter 32 Intro to Animals Chapter 32 1) Multicellular Organization (Different cells have different functions) Specialization: adaptation of a cell for a particular function Remember: cells tissues organs organ

More information

An Introduction to the Invertebrates, Part One Phyla Placozoa, Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora. Reference: Chapter 33.1, 33.2

An Introduction to the Invertebrates, Part One Phyla Placozoa, Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora. Reference: Chapter 33.1, 33.2 An Introduction to the Invertebrates, Part One Phyla Placozoa, Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora Reference: Chapter 33.1, 33.2 Overview: Life Without a Backbone v Invertebrates are animals that lack a backbone

More information

Name Class Date. After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions:

Name Class Date. After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: CHAPTER 14 3 Invertebrates SECTION Introduction to Animals BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What structures and systems perform basic life functions

More information

Chapter 32 Introduction to Animal Diversity

Chapter 32 Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32 Introduction to Animal Diversity Review: Biology 101 There are 3 domains: They are Archaea Bacteria Protista! Eukarya Endosymbiosis (proposed by Lynn Margulis) is a relationship between two

More information

Kingdom: Animals. Domain Archaea. Domain Eukarya. Domain Bacteria. Common ancestor

Kingdom: Animals. Domain Archaea. Domain Eukarya. Domain Bacteria. Common ancestor Kingdom: Animals Domain Eukarya Domain Bacteria Domain Archaea Domain Eukarya Common ancestor 1 Animal Characteristics Heterotrophs must ingest others for nutrients Multicellular complex bodies No cell

More information

Features of the Animal

Features of the Animal Features of the Animal Kingdom Bởi: OpenStaxCollege Even though members of the animal kingdom are incredibly diverse, animals share common features that distinguish them from organisms in other kingdoms.

More information

Chapter 32. Objectives. Table of Contents. Characteristics. Characteristics, continued. Section 1 The Nature of Animals

Chapter 32. Objectives. Table of Contents. Characteristics. Characteristics, continued. Section 1 The Nature of Animals Introduction to Animals Table of Contents Objectives Identify four important characteristics of animals. List two kinds of tissues found only in animals. Explain how the first animals may have evolved

More information

Animals. What are they? Where did they come from? What are their evolutionary novelties? What characterizes their diversification?

Animals. What are they? Where did they come from? What are their evolutionary novelties? What characterizes their diversification? Animals What are they? Where did they come from? What are their evolutionary novelties? What characterizes their diversification? What synapomorphies unite Animals Multicellular Heterotrophs (Metazoans)?

More information

INVERTEBRATES. The Earth and Living Things. Carme Font Casanovas 1

INVERTEBRATES. The Earth and Living Things. Carme Font Casanovas 1 INVERTEBRATES Living Things. Carme Font Casanovas 1 How many animals can you see? ant rose coral snake anemone fish grass bee Living Things. Carme Font Casanovas 2 Invertebrates There are animals without

More information

Are these organisms. animals or not?

Are these organisms. animals or not? 1 2 3 4 5 Are these organisms 6 7 8 animals or not? 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Typical Animal Characteristics Eukaryotic Multicellular Ability to move Reproduce Obtain food (heterotrophic)

More information

Revision Based on Chapter 25 Grade 11

Revision Based on Chapter 25 Grade 11 Revision Based on Chapter 25 Grade 11 Biology Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. A cell that contains a nucleus and membrane-bound organelles

More information

ANIMAL DIVERSITY AND THE EVOLUTION OF BODY PLANS

ANIMAL DIVERSITY AND THE EVOLUTION OF BODY PLANS ANIMAL DIVERSITY AND THE EVOLUTION OF BODY PLANS GENERAL FEATURES OF ANIMALS Heterotrophy - obtain energy and organic molecules by ingesting other organisms Multicellularity - Many have complex bodies

More information

Animals contain specialized cells

Animals contain specialized cells What is an Animal? Kingdom Animalia Main Characteristics Members of the Animal Kingdom are: Eukaryotic Multicellular Heterotrophic Have cells with membranes BUT NO cell wall Animals contain specialized

More information

Arthropoda ARTHRO JOINTED PODA FEET

Arthropoda ARTHRO JOINTED PODA FEET Arthropoda ARTHRO JOINTED PODA FEET The arthropods are a group of animals which has attained the greatest biological success largest number of species and individuals and occupy the greatest number of

More information

Chapter 32: An Introduction to Animal Diversity

Chapter 32: An Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32: An Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 32: An Introduction to Animal Diversity Name Period Concept 32.1 Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes with tissues that develop from

More information

The Animals, or Metazoa. Approximate proportions of animal species presently known; The true diversity of animals may be more than 90% Arthropods

The Animals, or Metazoa. Approximate proportions of animal species presently known; The true diversity of animals may be more than 90% Arthropods The Animals, or Metazoa Are some of the best-studied organisms Comprise over a million known species Originated c. the Cambrian (~550 MYA) Most animal phyla are marine; however, due to the diversity of

More information

Introduction to Animal Diversity. Chapter 23.1, 23.2 and additional

Introduction to Animal Diversity. Chapter 23.1, 23.2 and additional Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 23.1, 23.2 and additional 1 Think of an Animal... Does your choice have hair or fur? Does it have a skeleton? Over a million species of animals described 95% have

More information

Arthropods. Ch. 13, pg

Arthropods. Ch. 13, pg Arthropods Ch. 13, pg. 374-382 382 Arthropods Insects Arachnids Centipedes and Millipedes Crustaceans Characteristics of Arthropods Arthropods have jointed appendages and include legs, antennae, claws,

More information

Sponges and Cnidarians

Sponges and Cnidarians The Animal Kingdom Multicellular Sponges and Cnidarians Biology : Chapter 26 Eukaryotic Heterotrophs Cells lack cell walls 95% are invertebrates What Animals Do to Survive Feeding Response Respiration

More information

Embryonic Development. Chapters 32-34: Animal Diversity AP Biology Fig Zygote Cleavage Blastocoel. Cleavage.

Embryonic Development. Chapters 32-34: Animal Diversity AP Biology Fig Zygote Cleavage Blastocoel. Cleavage. Chapters 32-34: Animal Diversity AP Biology 2012 1 Animal Characteristics Heterotrophs Multicellular Eukaryotes Cells lack cell walls Bodies held together by structural proteins like collagen Contain nervous

More information

Chps : Animals. Characteristics of kingdom Animalia: Multicellular Heterotrophic Most are motile Possess sense organs

Chps : Animals. Characteristics of kingdom Animalia: Multicellular Heterotrophic Most are motile Possess sense organs Chps 23-26: Animals Chps. 23-27: Animals Characteristics of kingdom Animalia: Multicellular Heterotrophic Most are motile Possess sense organs Animal Characteristics Forms of symmetry: Radial Bilateral

More information

BIOLOGY. Chapter 27 Introduction to Animal Diversity

BIOLOGY. Chapter 27 Introduction to Animal Diversity BIOLOGY Chapter 27 Introduction to Animal Diversity Fig. 32-1 An Overview of Animal Diversity Multicellular Nutrition mode: Heterotrophic (ingestion) Cell structure & specialization Tissues develop from

More information

Chapter 7. Marine Animals Without a Backbone

Chapter 7. Marine Animals Without a Backbone Chapter 7 Marine Animals Without a Backbone General Characteristics of Animals Multicellular, diploid organisms with tissues, organs or organ systems in most Heterotrophic Require oxygen for aerobic

More information

2/17/2017. Lecture 10: Chapter 31 Protostome Diversity

2/17/2017. Lecture 10: Chapter 31 Protostome Diversity 1 Lecture 10: Chapter 31 Protostome Diversity 2 3 Protostomes: one of two monophyletic groups of bilaterally symmetrical, coelomate animals The other group is the Deuterostomes Differ in pattern of early

More information

Unit 12 ~ Learning Guide

Unit 12 ~ Learning Guide Unit 12 ~ Learning Guide Name: INSTRUCTIONS Complete the following notes and questions as you work through the related lessons. You are required to have this package completed BEFORE you write your unit

More information

Chapter 8-9 Intro to Animals. Image from:

Chapter 8-9 Intro to Animals. Image from: Chapter 8-9 Intro to Animals Image from: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/index.html Zoology Definition: the scientific study of the behavior, structure, physiology, classification, and distribution

More information

Section 4 Professor Donald McFarlane

Section 4 Professor Donald McFarlane Characteristics Section 4 Professor Donald McFarlane Lecture 11 Animals: Origins and Bauplans Multicellular heterotroph Cells lack cell walls Most have nerves, muscles, capacity to move at some point in

More information

BIOLOGY. An Introduction to Animal Diversity CAMPBELL. Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson

BIOLOGY. An Introduction to Animal Diversity CAMPBELL. Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson CAMPBELL BIOLOGY TENTH EDITION Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson 32 An Introduction to Animal Diversity Lecture Presentation by Nicole Tunbridge and Kathleen Fitzpatrick A Kingdom of Consumers

More information

Animal Body Plans. Aggregate Blind sac Tube-within-a-tube Segmented Molluscan Arthropod. Sponges. Acoelomate -Eucoelomate Annelid Mollusca Arthropoda

Animal Body Plans. Aggregate Blind sac Tube-within-a-tube Segmented Molluscan Arthropod. Sponges. Acoelomate -Eucoelomate Annelid Mollusca Arthropoda Animal Body Plans Aggregate Blind sac Tube-within-a-tube Segmented Molluscan Arthropod Sponges Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes Acoelomate -Eucoelomate Annelid Mollusca Arthropoda Size Constraints

More information

Characteristics of Echinoderms

Characteristics of Echinoderms Characteristics of Echinoderms Adult echinoderms have a body plan with five parts organized symmetrically around a center Does not have an anterior nor posterior end or a brain Most echinoderms are two

More information

UNIT 5 PROKARYOTES 16.1 Prokaryotes have inhabited Earth for billions of years Prokaryotes

UNIT 5 PROKARYOTES 16.1 Prokaryotes have inhabited Earth for billions of years Prokaryotes UNIT 5 PROKARYOTES 16.1 Prokaryotes have inhabited Earth for billions of years Prokaryotes Remain the most numerous and widespread organisms today Survive in environments too extreme for Despite being

More information

What defines the zygote, the blastula, and the gastrula? Draw pictures.

What defines the zygote, the blastula, and the gastrula? Draw pictures. What makes a multicellular organism multicellular? a) Multiple cells b) Multiple cells that work together c) Specialized cells d) Multiple specialized cells that work together What defines the zygote,

More information

3. Choanoflagellates resemble what? What is the significance of this resemblance?

3. Choanoflagellates resemble what? What is the significance of this resemblance? I. Animal Diversity 1. What are some basic characteristics of the animal kingdom? What characteristics make them different from plants? - Eukaryotic, heterotrophic (we don t make our own food), we store

More information

Lecture XII Origin of Animals Dr. Kopeny

Lecture XII Origin of Animals Dr. Kopeny Delivered 2/20 and 2/22 Lecture XII Origin of Animals Dr. Kopeny Origin of Animals and Diversification of Body Plans Phylogeny of animals based on morphology Porifera Cnidaria Ctenophora Platyhelminthes

More information

Introduction to Animal Diversity Lecture 7 Winter 2014

Introduction to Animal Diversity Lecture 7 Winter 2014 Introduction to Animal Diversity Lecture 7 Winter 2014 Evolution of Animals 1 Prokaryotes Eukaryotes Prokaryotes No nucleus Nucleoid region Simple No membrane bound organelles Smaller (1-5 nm) Evolutionarily

More information

Protists. Simple Eukaryotes. Regents Biology Common ancestor. Domain Archaebacteria. Domain Eukaryotes. Domain Bacteria

Protists. Simple Eukaryotes. Regents Biology Common ancestor. Domain Archaebacteria. Domain Eukaryotes. Domain Bacteria Protists Simple Eukaryotes Domain Bacteria Domain Archaebacteria Domain Eukaryotes Regents Biology 2006-2007 Common ancestor General characteristics Classification criteria eukaryotes not animal, plant

More information

Animal Diversity I: Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida

Animal Diversity I: Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida 1 Animal Diversity I: Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida Objectives: Be able to distinguish radial symmetry from bilateral symmetry. Be able to identify which of the phyla

More information

BIOLOGY - CLUTCH CH.32 - OVERVIEW OF ANIMALS.

BIOLOGY - CLUTCH CH.32 - OVERVIEW OF ANIMALS. !! www.clutchprep.com Animals are multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes that feed by ingesting their food Most animals are diploid, and produce gametes produced directly by meiosis Animals lack cell

More information

Invertebrate Survey Lab

Invertebrate Survey Lab Answer these questions before lab. 1. What kingdom do all animals fall into? a. Protist b. Animalia c. Eukarya 2. How many phyla of invertebrates are in appendix E on pages 1074-1076? a. 9 b. 7 c. 8 3.

More information

1. General Features of Animals

1. General Features of Animals Chapter 32: An Overview of Animal Diversity 1. General Features of Animals 2. The History of Animals 1. General Features of Animals General Characteristics of Animals animals are multicellular eukaryotic

More information

Unit 10: Animals Guided Reading Questions (80 pts total)

Unit 10: Animals Guided Reading Questions (80 pts total) Name: AP Biology Biology, Campbell and Reece, 7th Edition Adapted from chapter reading guides originally created by Lynn Miriello Chapter 32 An Introduction to Animal Diversity 1. Define the following

More information

Evolution and Biodiversity Laboratory Identifying Microorganisms in Aquatic Samples

Evolution and Biodiversity Laboratory Identifying Microorganisms in Aquatic Samples Evolution and Biodiversity Laboratory Identifying Microorganisms in Aquatic Samples Being able to identify organisms is important if you wish to discover what is already known about their natural history,

More information

Animals. Chapters Exam November 22, 2011

Animals. Chapters Exam November 22, 2011 Animals Chapters 32-35 Exam November 22, 2011 Overview of Animals Chapter 32 General Features of Animals and Evolution of the Body Plan General Features of Animals Heterotrophs Multicellular No Cell Walls

More information

Learning Objectives. The Animal Kingdom: An Introduction to Animal Diversity. Sexual Reproduction

Learning Objectives. The Animal Kingdom: An Introduction to Animal Diversity. Sexual Reproduction Learning Objectives The Animal Kingdom: An Introduction to Animal Diversity Chapter 29 What characters are common to most animals? Advantages and disadvantages of different environments Searching for relationships

More information

- found in bryozoans (moss animals), brachiopods (lamp shells) and phoronids (horseshoe worms)

- found in bryozoans (moss animals), brachiopods (lamp shells) and phoronids (horseshoe worms) Chapter 33 Protostome Animals - insects the phylum Arthropoda include the insects, crusraceans and myriapods and make up 40% of the total mass of organisms present 33.1 An Overview of Protostome Evolution

More information

*Add to Science Notebook Name 1

*Add to Science Notebook Name 1 *Add to Science Notebook Name 1 Arthropods, Ch. 13, pg. 374-382 Characteristics of Arthropods *Arthropods are the largest group of animals. *Arthropods have jointed and include,,, and. *Arthropod appendages

More information

What Is an Animal? Animals come in many shapes, forms, and sizes. About 98 percent of all animals are invertebrates. The Kingdom Animalia

What Is an Animal? Animals come in many shapes, forms, and sizes. About 98 percent of all animals are invertebrates. The Kingdom Animalia What Is an Animal? What characteristics do all animals have? Animals come in many shapes, forms, and sizes. Scientists estimate that there are between 1 and 2 million species of animals! Some, like whales

More information

An Introduction to the Invertebrates (part 4?!) Annelida & Nematoda. Reference: Chapter 33.3, 33.4

An Introduction to the Invertebrates (part 4?!) Annelida & Nematoda. Reference: Chapter 33.3, 33.4 An Introduction to the Invertebrates (part 4?!) Annelida & Nematoda Reference: Chapter 33.3, 33.4 More Relationships Slime molds Tubulinids Entamoebas Nucleariids Fungi Choanoflagellates Animals Excavata

More information

Mollusks. Use Target Reading Skills. b. invertebrate c. segmented body d. unsegmented body

Mollusks. Use Target Reading Skills. b. invertebrate c. segmented body d. unsegmented body Name Date Class Mollusks This section descnbes the features of mollusks aud identifies three mapr groups of mollusks. Use Target Reading Skills As vou read, compare and contrast the three groups of mollusks

More information

BIOLOGY. An Overview of Animal Diversity CAMPBELL. Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson

BIOLOGY. An Overview of Animal Diversity CAMPBELL. Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson CAMPBELL BIOLOGY TENTH EDITION Reece Urry Cain Wasserman Minorsky Jackson 32 An Overview of Animal Diversity Lecture Presentation by Nicole Tunbridge and Kathleen Fitzpatrick Concept 32.1: Animals are

More information

09/12/2012. Classification. Characteristics. Learning Outcome G2. Student Achievement Indicators. Phylum Porifera The Sponges

09/12/2012. Classification. Characteristics. Learning Outcome G2. Student Achievement Indicators. Phylum Porifera The Sponges Learning Outcome G2 Analyse the increasing complexity of the Phylum Porifera and the Phylum Cnidaria Learning Outcome G2 Phylum Porifera & Phylum Cnidaria Student Achievement Indicators Students who have

More information

6 characteristics blastula

6 characteristics blastula Animals Characteristics The animal kingdom is divided into approximately 35 phyla with diverse species. However, all organisms in the animal kingdom share these 6 characteristics Eukaryotic Lack cell walls

More information