PHYS 160 Astronomy Test #1 Fall 2017 Version B

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "PHYS 160 Astronomy Test #1 Fall 2017 Version B"

Transcription

1 PHYS 160 Astronomy Test #1 Fall 2017 Version B 1

2 I. True/False (1 point each) Circle the T if the statement is true, or F if the statement is false on your answer sheet. 1. An object has the same weight, but a different mass on different planets. 2. A Light-year is a unit of time. 3. A lunar eclipse can only occur during the new phase. 4. The northern hemisphere of Earth experiences Summer when the Earth is at aphelion. 5. The planets orbit the Sun at constant speeds. 6. The position of the North Celestial Pole is currently near the bright star Polaris. 7. Our solar system has a diameter of 1 light year. 8. The Sun follows the path of the celestial Equator throughout the year. 9. The name of our galaxy is The Milky Way 10. If the angular diameter of an object can be measured, and the distance to that object is known, then the true physical diameter can be calculated. II. Definitions (1 point each). There are 10 definitions given. Select the word or phrase that best matches the definition from the table of words below. Put your answer on the answer sheet. Note, there are more words than there are definitions, so not all of them will be matched. perihelion celestial sphere geocentric universe aphelion azimuth ecliptic parallax epicycle acceleration retrograde zodiac prograde zenith right ascension declination astronomical unit altitude diurnal motion eccentricity heliocentric universe equinox lightyear parsec solstice 1. A change in the direction or magnitude of velocity divided by the change in time. 2. In the geocentric universe, a moving circle about which planets revolve. 3. The angle of an object s position above the horizon. 4. The point in its orbit where a planet is farthest from the Sun. 5. The annual path of the Sun, relative to the stars on the Celestial Sphere; the plane of earth s orbit around the Sun. 6. The coordinate on the celestial sphere exactly analogous to Earth s longitude, measured in hours, minutes, and seconds from the vernal equinox. 7. The apparent backwards motion of a planet with respect to the fixed background stars. 8. A band of 13 constellations around the sky through which the Sun appears to move throughout the year. 9. A measure of the flatness of an ellipse; a measure between 0 (circle) and 1 (flat line). 10. A description of the cosmos where the Earth is at the orbital center of all celestial bodies. 2

3 III. Multiple Choice (1 point each) Select the letter next to the best answer for each question. Circle the letter on your answer sheet. 1. What basic shape do stars seem to trace in the northern sky if you watch (or do a time-lapsed photograph) over the course of an evening? a. circles, with the north celestial pole at the center. b. spirals, as the star moves while Earth rotates. c. straight lines d. ellipses, with the north star at one of the focal points. 2. During a solar eclipse, a. The Sun comes between the Earth and the Moon b. The Moon comes between the Earth and the Sun c. The Sun goes below the horizon d. Earth comes between the Sun and the Moon. 3. The ecliptic and celestial equator intersect at two points called the a. equinoxes b. solstices c. tropics d. sidereal points e. poles 4. Who came up with a hybrid model that was partly geocentric and partly heliocentric? a. Ptolemey b. Copernicus c. Tycho Brahe d. Galileo 5. The 4 largest moons of Jupiter were first discovered by which of the following scientists? a. William Herschel b. Johannes Kepler c. Tycho Brahe d. Isaac Newton e. Galileo Galilei 6. From any location upon Earth, the zenith defines a direction a. vertically above the North Pole. b. vertically above an observer. c. toward the Sun at noon. d. vertically above a point on the equator. 3

4 7. In ancient times, people distinguished the planets from the stars because a. planets appear much brighter than stars b. features on planet surfaces could be seen whereas no star s features could be seen. c. planets move relative to stars d. planets differ in color from the stars e. planets can be seen during the day 8. An arc minute is a. a measure of how far the Sun moves during one minute b. one-sixtieth of a degree c. how far the Earth turns on its axis in one minute d. 60 degrees e. the angular diameter of the Sun 9. How long will a lunar day be, at a location on the Moon s equator? a. About 28 days because the Moon rotates once per orbit around the Earth. b. Infinite. The Sun never appears to rise and set because the Moon does not rotate. c. 1 year because the Moon rotates to keep one face towards the Sun. d. depends on the phase of the Moon 10. When the Sun is at one of the equinoxes, a. day and night are of equal length only for people on the equator. b. the day is longer than the night in one hemisphere of Earth and shorter in the other hemisphere. c. people on the equator have perpetual daylight. d. day and night are of equal length everywhere on Earth. 11. A full moon always rises at approximately what time of day? a. sunset b. sunrise c. midnight d. noon e. depends on the time of year 12. If you are standing at Earth s North Pole, which of the following is directly overhead? a. celestial equator b. ecliptic c. zodiac d. polaris e. the Sun 4

5 13. In Antartica (South Pole), the longest period of daylight occurs in a. March b. June c. September d. December 14. Kepler's laws apply to the motion of a. the planets around the sun b. binary stars c. Earth satellites d. all of these e. none of these 15. According to Newton s First Law, a. an applied force always causes a change in velocity of the object b. an applied force always causes a change in position of the object c. the larger the force on an object, the larger the change in the rate of velocity of that object. d. if no unbalanced force is acting on an object, the object s speed and direction will remain constant. 16. Polaris is unique because a. it moves in a different direction than any other bright star b. it is the brightest star in the sky c. it twinkles more than any other bright star d. it is fairly bright and shows very little motion when viewed from Earth e. The premise is false. Polaris is not unique at all. 17. Ptolemy's theory placed the Earth a. at the center of the universe b. at the center of the solar system, but far from the center of the universe c. in orbit around the sun d. in orbit around the moon e. none of the above 18. The Sun s apparent path is a. always south of the celestial equator b. right on the celestial equator c. always north of the celestial equator d. is south of the celestial equator for part of the time and north of the celestial equator for part of the time. e. crosses the north celestial pole once per year. 5

6 19. To measure the position of a star on the celestial sphere, we use the coordinates a. latitude and longitude b. celestial latitude and celestial longitude c. right ascension and declination d. equinox and solstice e. prograde and retrograde 20. we would expect an eclipse at every full moon and new moon if a. the moon had a larger orbit around the Earth b. the Earth had a larger orbit around the sun c. the moon's orbit around the Earth were perpendicular to the Earth's orbit around the sun d. the plane of the moon's orbit around the Earth coincided with the plane of the Earth's orbit around the sun 21. Which of the following is not true about the ecliptic? a. It is the path taken by the Moon as it orbits the Earth. b. It passes through the constellations of the zodiac. c. It is the plane in which the Earth orbits around the Sun. d. It forms a circle on the celestial sphere that is inclined at an angle of 23.5 degrees to the celestial equator. e. It is the apparent path through the sky taken by the Sun over the course of a year. 22. If the Earth s rotational axis were not tilted with respect to the ecliptic plane, a. the daylight period on Earth would be the same year-round b. there would be no seasonal variations on Earth. c. Earth s poles would not experience 6 month-long nights d. all of the above 23. What was the greatest contribution of Tycho Brahe to astronomy? a. He developed a Sun-centered model of the universe b. he was the first to use a telescope to make astronomical observations c. he proposed some simple laws to describe the motion of planets and other objects d. he determined that the planets orbit the Sun in elliptical orbits e. he amassed a large number of precise measurements of stellar and planetary positions. 24. When the moon is between the sun and the Earth, we call its phase a. full moon b. last quarter c. new moon d. you can't fool me; the moon can never get between the sun and the Earth 6

7 25. The most useful distance measurement unit to describe the distance between the Sun and each planet is a. the lightyear b. meters c. kilometers d. parsecs e. astronomical units 26. If the mass of the Sun were doubled, the force of gravity between the Sun and Earth would a. stay the same b. be 4 times larger c. be 4 times smaller d. be 2 times larger 27. Modern scientists now know that the nightly motion of stars and planets in our night sky is caused by a. the revolution of the Earth around the Sun. b. the rotation of the entire celestial sphere around the Earth c. the rotation of the Earth on its axis. d. the motion of the solar system around the galaxy. 28. Before the invention of the telescope, the known planets were a. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn b. Mercury, Venus, mars, Uranus, and Neptune c. only Venus, Mars, and Jupiter d. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto 29. How much of the total surface of the Moon is illuminated by the Sun in 1 st quarter phase? a. one quarter b. one half c. all of it d. none of it 30. Assuming clear skies everywhere, a total solar eclipse is visible a. to people anywhere in the sunlit hemisphere of Earth b. to everyone on Earth c. only to people in a circular area on Earth having a diameter equal to the diameter of the Moon d. only to people in a long narrow path much smaller than the hemisphere. 7

8 IV. Short Answer Questions Answer any five (5) of the following questions. Each question is worth 10 points. Answers may contain paragraphs, lists, and drawings. Please put your answers on the white paper provided. 1. Describe how solar and lunar eclipses occur. Why do we not see eclipses twice per month? Which kind of eclipse are you more likely to see from our location in a given year 2. Describe what you might see in the night sky if you are in a dark location in central Arkansas facing north and you observe for several hours. 3. Explain the statement: The farther away we look in distance, the further back we look in time. 4. How do the following motions affect the position of objects in our sky: Earth s rotation on an axis defined by the north and south poles, Earth s rotation around the Sun, the rotation of the Moon around the Earth, precession? 5. Is the far side of the Moon the same as the dark side of the Moon? Explain. 6. What is meant by a geocentric universe? Name the three scientists who played the primary roles in overturning the geocentric viewpoint. Describe their main contributions to astronomy. 8

PHYS 160 Astronomy Test #1 Name Answer Key Test Version A

PHYS 160 Astronomy Test #1 Name Answer Key Test Version A PHYS 160 Astronomy Test #1 Name Answer Key Test Version A True False Multiple Choice 1. T 1. C 2. F 2. B 3. T 3. A 4. T 4. E 5. T 5. B 6. F 6. A 7. F 7. A 8. T 8. D 9. F 9. D 10. F 10. B 11. B 12. D Definitions

More information

3) During retrograde motion a planet appears to be A) dimmer than usual. B) the same brightness as usual C) brighter than usual.

3) During retrograde motion a planet appears to be A) dimmer than usual. B) the same brightness as usual C) brighter than usual. Descriptive Astronomy (ASTR 108) Exam 1 B February 17, 2010 Name: In each of the following multiple choice questions, select the best possible answer. In the line on the scan sheet corresponding to the

More information

1) Kepler's third law allows us to find the average distance to a planet from observing its period of rotation on its axis.

1) Kepler's third law allows us to find the average distance to a planet from observing its period of rotation on its axis. Descriptive Astronomy (ASTR 108) Exam 1 A February 17, 2010 Name: In each of the following multiple choice questions, select the best possible answer. In the line on the scan sheet corresponding to the

More information

Practice Test DeAnza College Astronomy 04 Test 1 Spring Quarter 2009

Practice Test DeAnza College Astronomy 04 Test 1 Spring Quarter 2009 Practice Test DeAnza College Astronomy 04 Test 1 Spring Quarter 2009 Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Mark answer on Scantron.

More information

Earth Science, 13e Tarbuck & Lutgens

Earth Science, 13e Tarbuck & Lutgens Earth Science, 13e Tarbuck & Lutgens Origins of Modern Astronomy Earth Science, 13e Chapter 21 Stanley C. Hatfield Southwestern Illinois College Early history of astronomy Ancient Greeks Used philosophical

More information

Earth Science, 11e. Origin of Modern Astronomy Chapter 21. Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy

Earth Science, 11e. Origin of Modern Astronomy Chapter 21. Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy 2006 Pearson Prentice Hall Lecture Outlines PowerPoint Chapter 21 Earth Science 11e Tarbuck/Lutgens This work is protected by United States copyright laws and is provided solely for the use of instructors

More information

1. The Moon appears larger when it rises than when it is high in the sky because

1. The Moon appears larger when it rises than when it is high in the sky because 2-1 Copyright 2016 All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of 1. The Moon appears larger when it rises than when it is high in the sky because A. you are

More information

Name: Exam 1, 9/30/05

Name: Exam 1, 9/30/05 Multiple Choice: Select the choice that best answers each question. Write your choice in the blank next to each number. (2 points each) 1. At the North Pole in mid-november, the sun rises at a. North of

More information

Test 1 Review Chapter 1 Our place in the universe

Test 1 Review Chapter 1 Our place in the universe Test 1 Review Bring Gator 1 ID card Bring pencil #2 with eraser No use of calculator or any electronic device during the exam We provide the scantrons Formulas will be projected on the screen You can use

More information

Name and Student ID Section Day/Time:

Name and Student ID Section Day/Time: AY2 - Overview of the Universe - Midterm #1 - Instructor: Maria F. Duran Name and Student ID Section Day/Time: 1) Imagine we ve discovered a planet orbiting another star at 1 AU every 6 months. The planet

More information

Astronomy 1143 Quiz 1 Review

Astronomy 1143 Quiz 1 Review Astronomy 1143 Quiz 1 Review Prof. Pradhan September 7, 2017 I What is Science? 1. Explain the difference between astronomy and astrology. Astrology: nonscience using zodiac sign to predict the future/personality

More information

lightyears observable universe astronomical unit po- laris perihelion Milky Way

lightyears observable universe astronomical unit po- laris perihelion Milky Way 1 Chapter 1 Astronomical distances are so large we typically measure distances in lightyears: the distance light can travel in one year, or 9.46 10 12 km or 9, 600, 000, 000, 000 km. Looking into the sky

More information

Chapter 1: Discovering the Night Sky. The sky is divided into 88 unequal areas that we call constellations.

Chapter 1: Discovering the Night Sky. The sky is divided into 88 unequal areas that we call constellations. Chapter 1: Discovering the Night Sky Constellations: Recognizable patterns of the brighter stars that have been derived from ancient legends. Different cultures have associated the patterns with their

More information

Astronomy I Exam I Sample Name: Read each question carefully, and choose the best answer.

Astronomy I Exam I Sample Name: Read each question carefully, and choose the best answer. Name: Read each question carefully, and choose the best answer. 1. During a night in Schuylkill Haven, most of the stars in the sky (A) are stationary through the night. (B) the actual motion depends upon

More information

REVIEW CH #0. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1)

REVIEW CH #0. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1) REVIEW CH #0 TRUE/FALSE. Write 'T' if the statement is true and 'F' if the statement is false. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1) 2) Latitude and right ascension

More information

astronomy A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times.

astronomy A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times. astronomy 2008 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times. 5. If the distance between the Earth and the Sun were

More information

Chapter 02 The Rise of Astronomy

Chapter 02 The Rise of Astronomy Chapter 02 The Rise of Astronomy Multiple Choice Questions 1. The moon appears larger when it rises than when it is high in the sky because A. You are closer to it when it rises (angular-size relation).

More information

Brock University. Test 1, September 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: September 29, 2014

Brock University. Test 1, September 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: September 29, 2014 Brock University Test 1, September 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: September 29, 2014 Number of hours: 50 min Time of Examination: 18:00 18:50 Instructor:

More information

CHAPTER 2 A USER'S GUIDE TO THE SKY

CHAPTER 2 A USER'S GUIDE TO THE SKY CHAPTER 2 A USER'S GUIDE TO THE SKY MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. In one way of naming stars, a letter indicates its brightness relative to the other stars in the constellation. a. English b. Arabic c. Greek d. Cyrillic

More information

a. 0.1 AU b. 10 AU c light years d light years

a. 0.1 AU b. 10 AU c light years d light years 1 AST104 Sp2006: EXAM 1 Multiple Choice Questions: Mark the best answer choice on the bubble form. Read all answer choices before making selection. (No credit given when multiple answers are marked.) 1.

More information

3. The diagram below shows the Moon at four positions in its orbit around Earth as viewed from above the North Pole.

3. The diagram below shows the Moon at four positions in its orbit around Earth as viewed from above the North Pole. 1. Which object orbits Earth in both the Earth-centered (geocentric) and Sun-centered (heliocentric) models of our solar system? (1) Polaris (3) the Sun (2) Venus (4) the Moon 2. A cycle of Moon phases

More information

Topic 10: Earth in Space Workbook Chapters 10 and 11

Topic 10: Earth in Space Workbook Chapters 10 and 11 Topic 10: Earth in Space Workbook Chapters 10 and 11 We can imagine all the celestial objects seen from Earth the sun, stars, the Milky way, and planets as being positioned on a celestial sphere. Earth

More information

Position 3. None - it is always above the horizon. Agree with student 2; star B never crosses horizon plane, so it can t rise or set.

Position 3. None - it is always above the horizon. Agree with student 2; star B never crosses horizon plane, so it can t rise or set. Position 3 None - it is always above the horizon. N E W S Agree with student 2; star B never crosses horizon plane, so it can t rise or set. Imaginary plane No; the Earth blocks the view. Star A at position

More information

Astronomy 103: First Exam

Astronomy 103: First Exam Name: Astronomy 103: First Exam Stephen Lepp September 21, 2010 Each question is worth 2 points. Write your name on this exam and on the scantron. Short Answer Mercury What is the closest Planet to the

More information

Name: Class: Date: ID: A

Name: Class: Date: ID: A Name: Class: _ Date: _ Astro Quiz 2 (ch2) Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Star A has an apparent visual magnitude of 13.4 and star B has

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 1 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations

More information

a. 0.5 AU b. 5 AU c. 50 AU d.* AU e AU

a. 0.5 AU b. 5 AU c. 50 AU d.* AU e AU 1 AST104 Sp04: WELCOME TO EXAM 1 Multiple Choice Questions: Mark the best answer choice. Read all answer choices before making selection. (No credit given when multiple answers are marked.) 1. A galaxy

More information

Brock University. Test 1, October 2016 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: October 3, 2016

Brock University. Test 1, October 2016 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: October 3, 2016 Brock University Test 1, October 2016 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: October 3, 2016 Number of hours: 50 min Time of Examination: 17:00 17:50 Instructor:

More information

Astronomy 1010 Planetary Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 1

Astronomy 1010 Planetary Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 1 Astronomy 1010 Planetary Astronomy Sample Questions for Exam 1 Chapter 1 1. A scientific hypothesis is a) a wild, baseless guess about how something works. b) a collection of ideas that seems to explain

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. What does the universe look like from Earth? Constellations. 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. What does the universe look like from Earth? Constellations. 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations we

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations we

More information

Name: Date: 5. The bright stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair form A) the summer triangle. B) the winter triangle. C) the Big Dipper. D) Orion, the Hunter.

Name: Date: 5. The bright stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair form A) the summer triangle. B) the winter triangle. C) the Big Dipper. D) Orion, the Hunter. Name: Date: 1. If there are about 6000 stars in the entire sky that can be seen by the unaided human eye, about how many stars would be seen at a particular instant on a given dark night from a single

More information

D. A system of assumptions and principles applicable to a wide range of phenomena that has been repeatedly verified

D. A system of assumptions and principles applicable to a wide range of phenomena that has been repeatedly verified ASTRONOMY 1 EXAM 1 Name Identify Terms - Matching (20 @ 1 point each = 20 pts.) 1 Solar System G 7. aphelion N 14. eccentricity M 2. Planet E 8. apparent visual magnitude R 15. empirical Q 3. Star P 9.

More information

Observing the Universe for Yourself

Observing the Universe for Yourself Observing the Universe for Yourself Figure 6-20 Solar-System Formation What does the universe look like from Earth? With the naked eye, we can see more than 2,000 stars as well as the Milky Way. A constellation

More information

Chapter 2 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 2 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Discovering the Universe for Yourself Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the

More information

Brock University. Test 1, May 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: May 21, 2014

Brock University. Test 1, May 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: May 21, 2014 Brock University Test 1, May 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: May 21, 2014 Number of hours: 50 min Time of Examination: 14:00 14:50 Instructor: B.Mitrović

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations we

More information

Discovering the Night Sky

Discovering the Night Sky Discovering the Night Sky Guiding Questions 1. What role did astronomy play in ancient civilizations? 2. Are the stars that make up a constellation actually close to one another? 3. Are the same stars

More information

Discovering the Night Sky

Discovering the Night Sky Guiding Questions Discovering the Night Sky 1. What role did astronomy play in ancient civilizations? 2. Are the stars that make up a constellation actually close to one another? 3. Are the same stars

More information

Exam #1 Covers material from first day of class, all the way through Tides and Nature of Light Supporting reading chapters 1-5 Some questions are

Exam #1 Covers material from first day of class, all the way through Tides and Nature of Light Supporting reading chapters 1-5 Some questions are Exam #1 Covers material from first day of class, all the way through Tides and Nature of Light Supporting reading chapters 1-5 Some questions are concept questions, some involve working with equations,

More information

Unit 2: Celestial Mechanics

Unit 2: Celestial Mechanics Unit 2: Celestial Mechanics The position of the Earth Ptolemy (90 168 AD) Made tables that allowed a user to locate the position of a planet at any past, present, or future date. In order to maintain circular

More information

The Celestial Sphere. GEK1506 Heavenly Mathematics: Cultural Astronomy

The Celestial Sphere. GEK1506 Heavenly Mathematics: Cultural Astronomy The Celestial Sphere GEK1506 Heavenly Mathematics: Cultural Astronomy Helmer Aslaksen Department of Mathematics National University of Singapore aslaksen@math.nus.edu.sg www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/ The

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Exam 1 Physics 101 Fall 2014 Chapters 1-3 Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) Suppose we look at a photograph of many galaxies.

More information

2) The number one million can be expressed in scientific notation as: (c) a) b) 10 3 c) 10 6 d)

2) The number one million can be expressed in scientific notation as: (c) a) b) 10 3 c) 10 6 d) Astronomy Phys 181 Midterm Examination Choose the best answer from the choices provided. 1) What is the range of values that the coordinate Declination can have? (a) a) -90 to +90 degrees b) 0 to 360 degrees

More information

AST 2010 Descriptive Astronomy Study Guide Exam I

AST 2010 Descriptive Astronomy Study Guide Exam I AST 2010 Descriptive Astronomy Study Guide Exam I Wayne State University 1 Introduction and overview Identify the most significant structures in the universe: Earth, planets, Sun, solar system, stars,

More information

Astronomy 291. Professor Bradley M. Peterson

Astronomy 291. Professor Bradley M. Peterson Astronomy 291 Professor Bradley M. Peterson The Sky As a first step, we need to understand the appearance of the sky. Important points (to be explained): The relative positions of stars remain the same

More information

Chapter 2 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself

Chapter 2 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Chapter 2 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Discovering the Universe for Yourself Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the

More information

18. Kepler as a young man became the assistant to A) Nicolaus Copernicus. B) Ptolemy. C) Tycho Brahe. D) Sir Isaac Newton.

18. Kepler as a young man became the assistant to A) Nicolaus Copernicus. B) Ptolemy. C) Tycho Brahe. D) Sir Isaac Newton. Name: Date: 1. The word planet is derived from a Greek term meaning A) bright nighttime object. B) astrological sign. C) wanderer. D) nontwinkling star. 2. The planets that were known before the telescope

More information

PHYS 155 Introductory Astronomy

PHYS 155 Introductory Astronomy PHYS 155 Introductory Astronomy - observing sessions: Sunday Thursday, 9pm, weather permitting http://www.phys.uconn.edu/observatory - Exam - Tuesday March 20, - Review Monday 6:30-9pm, PB 38 Marek Krasnansky

More information

Knowing the Heavens. Chapter Two. Guiding Questions. Naked-eye (unaided-eye) astronomy had an important place in ancient civilizations

Knowing the Heavens. Chapter Two. Guiding Questions. Naked-eye (unaided-eye) astronomy had an important place in ancient civilizations Knowing the Heavens Chapter Two Guiding Questions 1. What role did astronomy play in ancient civilizations? 2. Are the stars that make up a constellation actually close to one another? 3. Are the same

More information

Chapter. Origin of Modern Astronomy

Chapter. Origin of Modern Astronomy Chapter Origin of Modern Astronomy 22.1 Early Astronomy Ancient Greeks Astronomy is the science that studies the universe. It includes the observation and interpretation of celestial bodies and phenomena.

More information

ASTRONOMY QUIZ NUMBER 1

ASTRONOMY QUIZ NUMBER 1 ASTRONOMY QUIZ NUMBER. You read in an astronomy atlas that an object has a negative right ascension. You immediately conclude that A) the object is located in the Southern Sky. B) the object is located

More information

Lecture 2: Motions of the Earth and Moon. Astronomy 111 Wednesday August 30, 2017

Lecture 2: Motions of the Earth and Moon. Astronomy 111 Wednesday August 30, 2017 Lecture 2: Motions of the Earth and Moon Astronomy 111 Wednesday August 30, 2017 Reminders Online homework #1 due Monday at 3pm Labs start next week Motions of the Earth ASTR111 Lecture 2 Observation:

More information

ASTRO 6570 Lecture 1

ASTRO 6570 Lecture 1 ASTRO 6570 Lecture 1 Historical Survey EARLY GREEK ASTRONOMY: Earth-centered universe - Some radical suggestions for a sun-centered model Shape of the Earth - Aristotle (4 th century BCE) made the first

More information

1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.) Equinox b.) Celestial equator c.) Solstice d.) Ecliptic

1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.) Equinox b.) Celestial equator c.) Solstice d.) Ecliptic Chapter 1 1-1. How long does it take the Earth to orbit the Sun? a.) one sidereal day b.) one month c.) one year d.) one hour 1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.)

More information

Brock University. Test 1, October 2017 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 1 Number of Students: 470 Date of Examination: October 3, 2017

Brock University. Test 1, October 2017 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 1 Number of Students: 470 Date of Examination: October 3, 2017 Brock University Test 1, October 2017 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 1 Number of Students: 470 Date of Examination: October 3, 2017 Number of hours: 50 min Time of Examination: 17:00 17:50

More information

Origin of Modern Astronomy Chapter 21

Origin of Modern Astronomy Chapter 21 Origin of Modern Astronomy Chapter 21 Early history of astronomy Ancient Greeks Used philosophical arguments to explain natural phenomena Also used some observa:onal data (looking at the night sky) Ancient

More information

Introduction To Modern Astronomy II

Introduction To Modern Astronomy II ASTR 111 003 Fall 2006 Lecture 03 Sep. 18, 2006 Introduction To Modern Astronomy II Introducing Astronomy (chap. 1-6) Planets and Moons (chap. 7-17) Ch1: Astronomy and the Universe Ch2: Knowing the Heavens

More information

Gravitation Part I. Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler

Gravitation Part I. Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler Gravitation Part I. Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler Celestial motions The stars: Uniform daily motion about the celestial poles (rising and setting). The Sun: Daily motion around the celestial

More information

DeAnza College Winter First Midterm Exam MAKE ALL MARKS DARK AND COMPLETE.

DeAnza College Winter First Midterm Exam MAKE ALL MARKS DARK AND COMPLETE. FAMILY NAME : (Please PRINT!) GIVEN NAME : (Please PRINT!) Signature: ASTRONOMY 4 DeAnza College Winter 2018 First Midterm Exam MAKE ALL MARKS DARK AND COMPLETE. Instructions: 1. On your Parscore sheet

More information

SPACE REVIEW. 1. The time it takes for the Earth to around the sun is one year. a. rotate b. revolve

SPACE REVIEW. 1. The time it takes for the Earth to around the sun is one year. a. rotate b. revolve SPACE REVIEW 1. The time it takes for the Earth to around the sun is one year. a. rotate b. revolve 2. Which planet is known as the "Red Planet"? a. Earth b. Mars c. Uranus d. Venus 3. One complete revolution

More information

Astr 1050 Mon. Jan. 31, 2017

Astr 1050 Mon. Jan. 31, 2017 Astr 1050 Mon. Jan. 31, 2017 Finish Ch. 2: Eclipses & Planetary Motion Seasons Angular Size formula Eclipses Planetary Motion Reading: For Today: Finish Chapter 2 For Monday: Start Chapter 3 Homework on

More information

ASTRONOMY 1010 Exam 1 September 21, 2007

ASTRONOMY 1010 Exam 1 September 21, 2007 ASTRONOMY 1010 Exam 1 September 21, 2007 Name Please write and mark your name and student number in the Scantron answer sheet. FILL THE BUBBLE IN THE "TEST FORM" BOX CORRESPONDING TO YOUR TEST VERSION

More information

Introduction To Modern Astronomy I

Introduction To Modern Astronomy I ASTR 111 003 Fall 2006 Lecture 03 Sep. 18, 2006 Introduction To Modern Astronomy I Introducing Astronomy (chap. 1-6) Planets and Moons (chap. 7-17) Ch1: Astronomy and the Universe Ch2: Knowing the Heavens

More information

Introduction to Astronomy

Introduction to Astronomy Introduction to Astronomy AST0111-3 (Astronomía) Semester 2014B Prof. Thomas H. Puzia Theme Our Sky 1. Celestial Sphere 2. Diurnal Movement 3. Annual Movement 4. Lunar Movement 5. The Seasons 6. Eclipses

More information

Earth s Motions. Rotation -!! Period of Rotation - amount of time to make one complete rotation Example: Earth rotates in hours.

Earth s Motions. Rotation -!! Period of Rotation - amount of time to make one complete rotation Example: Earth rotates in hours. Name: Date: Period: Earth In the Solar System The Physical Setting: Earth Science CLASS NOTES! Rotation -! Period of Rotation - amount of time to make one complete rotation Example: Earth rotates in hours

More information

Orbital Mechanics. CTLA Earth & Environmental Science

Orbital Mechanics. CTLA Earth & Environmental Science Orbital Mechanics CTLA Earth & Environmental Science The Earth Spherical body that is flattened near the poles due to centrifugal force (rotation of the Earth) 40,074 KM across at the Equator 40,0007 KM

More information

2. See FIGURE B. In the Renaissance times, he proposed this model of the solar system (name this person).

2. See FIGURE B. In the Renaissance times, he proposed this model of the solar system (name this person). ASTRONOMY 5 MIDTERM EXAM PART I SPRING 2019 60 QUESTIONS 50 POINTS: Part I of the midterm constitutes the Take-Home part of the entire Midterm Exam. Additionally, this Take-Home part is divided into two

More information

Astronomy. 1. (3 pts.) What is meant by the apparent magnitude of a star?

Astronomy. 1. (3 pts.) What is meant by the apparent magnitude of a star? Astronomy Name NaSc 109 Summer 2018 Exam 2 Don't Panic! Take a big deep breath... hold it... holllld it now let it out. Use your available time on this exam very efficiently; if you don't know an answer

More information

Name Regents Review Packet #2 Date

Name Regents Review Packet #2 Date Name Regents Review Packet #2 Date Base your answers to questions 1 through 5 on diagram below, which represents the Sun s apparent paths and the solar noon positions for an observer at 42 N latitude on

More information

Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy. Positions in the sky. Lecture 3: The Sun & Constellations

Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy. Positions in the sky. Lecture 3: The Sun & Constellations Lecture 3: The Sun & Constellations Professor Kenny L. Tapp Early history of astronomy Birth of modern astronomy Noted scientist Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) Ushered in new astronomy Planets revolve around

More information

4 Solar System and Time

4 Solar System and Time 4 olar ystem and Time 4.1 The Universe 4.1.1 Introduction The Universe consists of countless galaxies distributed throughout space. The bodies used in astro navigation belong to the Galaxy known as the

More information

The Sky Perceptions of the Sky

The Sky Perceptions of the Sky The Sky Perceptions of the Sky An Observer-Centered Hemisphere Night & Day - Black & Blue - Stars & Sun Atmospheric & Astronomical Phenomena Weather, Clouds, Rainbows,... versus Sun, Moon, Stars, Planets,...

More information

Lecture #5: Plan. The Beginnings of Modern Astronomy Kepler s Laws Galileo

Lecture #5: Plan. The Beginnings of Modern Astronomy Kepler s Laws Galileo Lecture #5: Plan The Beginnings of Modern Astronomy Kepler s Laws Galileo Geocentric ( Ptolemaic ) Model Retrograde Motion: Apparent backward (= East-to-West) motion of a planet with respect to stars Ptolemy

More information

Useful Formulas and Values

Useful Formulas and Values Name Test 1 Planetary and Stellar Astronomy 2017 (Last, First) The exam has 20 multiple choice questions (3 points each) and 8 short answer questions (5 points each). This is a closed-book, closed-notes

More information

Intro to Astronomy. Looking at Our Space Neighborhood

Intro to Astronomy. Looking at Our Space Neighborhood Intro to Astronomy Looking at Our Space Neighborhood Astronomy: The Original Science Ancient cultures used the movement of stars, planets and the moon to mark time Astronomy: the study of the universe

More information

Introduction To Modern Astronomy I: Solar System

Introduction To Modern Astronomy I: Solar System ASTR 111 003 Fall 2007 Lecture 02 Sep. 10, 2007 Introduction To Modern Astronomy I: Solar System Introducing Astronomy (chap. 1-6) Planets and Moons (chap. 7-15) Chap. 16: Our Sun Chap. 28: Search for

More information

James T. Shipman Jerry D. Wilson Charles A. Higgins, Jr. Chapter 15 Place and Time

James T. Shipman Jerry D. Wilson Charles A. Higgins, Jr. Chapter 15 Place and Time James T. Shipman Jerry D. Wilson Charles A. Higgins, Jr. Chapter 15 Place and Time Place & Time Read sections 15.5 and 15.6, but ignore the math. Concentrate on those sections that help explain the slides.

More information

Exam #1 Study Guide (Note this is not all the information you need to know for the test, these are just SOME of the main points)

Exam #1 Study Guide (Note this is not all the information you need to know for the test, these are just SOME of the main points) Exam #1 Study Guide (Note this is not all the information you need to know for the test, these are just SOME of the main points) Moon Phases Moon is always ½ illuminated by the Sun, and the sunlit side

More information

Planets in the Sky ASTR 101 2/16/2018

Planets in the Sky ASTR 101 2/16/2018 Planets in the Sky ASTR 101 2/16/2018 1 Planets in the Sky 2018 paths of Jupiter among stars (2017/2018) Unlike stars which have fixed positions in the sky (celestial sphere), planets seem to move with

More information

Gravitation and the Motion of the Planets

Gravitation and the Motion of the Planets Gravitation and the Motion of the Planets 1 Guiding Questions 1. How did ancient astronomers explain the motions of the planets? 2. Why did Copernicus think that the Earth and the other planets go around

More information

AST 1002 Section 1 (Dobrosavljevic) PLANETS, STARS, GALAXIES

AST 1002 Section 1 (Dobrosavljevic) PLANETS, STARS, GALAXIES Your name (print) Your FSUID AST 1002 Section 1 (Dobrosavljevic) PLANETS, STARS, GALAXIES Midterm Exam 1, Fall 2018 Instructions: 1. Use a pencil for marking the machine scoring sheet. 2. Enter and encode

More information

d. Galileo Galilei i. Heard about lenses being used to magnify objects 1. created his own telescopes to 30 power not the inventor! 2. looked

d. Galileo Galilei i. Heard about lenses being used to magnify objects 1. created his own telescopes to 30 power not the inventor! 2. looked 1. Age of Reason a. Nicolaus Copernicus 1473-1543 i. Commenteriolus manuscript circulated from 1512 1. unpublished 2. Heliocentric hypothesis ii. On the Revolutions of the Planets published year of his

More information

Learning Objectives. one night? Over the course of several nights? How do true motion and retrograde motion differ?

Learning Objectives. one night? Over the course of several nights? How do true motion and retrograde motion differ? Kepler s Laws Learning Objectives! Do the planets move east or west over the course of one night? Over the course of several nights? How do true motion and retrograde motion differ?! What are geocentric

More information

ASTR 1P01 Test 1, May 2018 Page 1 BROCK UNIVERSITY. Test 1: Spring 2018 Number of pages: 10 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 1 Number of students: 598

ASTR 1P01 Test 1, May 2018 Page 1 BROCK UNIVERSITY. Test 1: Spring 2018 Number of pages: 10 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 1 Number of students: 598 ASTR 1P01 Test 1, May 2018 Page 1 BROCK UNIVERSITY Test 1: Spring 2018 Number of pages: 10 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 1 Number of students: 598 Examination date: 12 May 2018 Time limit: 50 min Time of

More information

Observing the Night Sky: Locating Objects

Observing the Night Sky: Locating Objects Observing the Night Sky: Locating Objects As I left the house this morning, there was a bright bluish light above and to the left of my neighbors house (approximately East) and a big very bright object

More information

In The Beginning and Cosmology Becomes a Science

In The Beginning and Cosmology Becomes a Science In The Beginning and Cosmology Becomes a Science Naked-eye (unaided-eye) astronomy had an important place in ancient civilizations Positional astronomy the study of the positions of objects in the sky

More information

Ch. 22 Origin of Modern Astronomy Pretest

Ch. 22 Origin of Modern Astronomy Pretest Ch. 22 Origin of Modern Astronomy Pretest Ch. 22 Origin of Modern Astronomy Pretest 1. True or False: Early Greek astronomers (600 B.C. A.D. 150) used telescopes to observe the stars. Ch. 22 Origin of

More information

1. The bar graph below shows one planetary characteristic, identified as X, plotted for the planets of our solar system.

1. The bar graph below shows one planetary characteristic, identified as X, plotted for the planets of our solar system. 1. The bar graph below shows one planetary characteristic, identified as X, plotted for the planets of our solar system. Which characteristic of the planets in our solar system is represented by X? A)

More information

ASTR 1P01 Test 1, September 2018 Page 1 BROCK UNIVERSITY

ASTR 1P01 Test 1, September 2018 Page 1 BROCK UNIVERSITY ASTR 1P01 Test 1, September 2018 Page 1 BROCK UNIVERSITY Test 1: Fall 2018 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 2 Number of students: 1300 Examination date: 29 September 2018 Time limit: 50 min

More information

Early Theories. Early astronomers believed that the sun, planets and stars orbited Earth (geocentric model) Developed by Aristotle

Early Theories. Early astronomers believed that the sun, planets and stars orbited Earth (geocentric model) Developed by Aristotle Planetary Motion Early Theories Early astronomers believed that the sun, planets and stars orbited Earth (geocentric model) Developed by Aristotle Stars appear to move around Earth Observations showed

More information

Dr. Tariq Al-Abdullah

Dr. Tariq Al-Abdullah 1 Chapter 1 Charting the Heavens The Foundations of Astronomy 2 Learning Goals: 1. Our Place in Space 2. The Obvious view 3. Earth s Orbital Motion 4. The Motion of the Moon 5. The Measurement of Distance

More information

How big is the Universe and where are we in it?

How big is the Universe and where are we in it? Announcements Results of clicker questions from Monday are on ICON. First homework is graded on ICON. Next homework due one minute before midnight on Tuesday, September 6. Labs start this week. All lab

More information

Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets

Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets Chapter Four Guiding Questions 1. How did ancient astronomers explain the motions of the planets? 2. Why did Copernicus think that the Earth and the other planets

More information

Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets. Chapter Four

Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets. Chapter Four Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets Chapter Four Guiding Questions 1. How did ancient astronomers explain the motions of the planets? 2. Why did Copernicus think that the Earth and the other planets

More information

ASTR-1010: Astronomy I Course Notes Section III

ASTR-1010: Astronomy I Course Notes Section III ASTR-1010: Astronomy I Course Notes Section III Dr. Donald G. Luttermoser Department of Physics and Astronomy East Tennessee State University Edition 2.0 Abstract These class notes are designed for use

More information

The celestial sphere, the coordinates system, seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses. Chapters 2 and S1

The celestial sphere, the coordinates system, seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses. Chapters 2 and S1 The celestial sphere, the coordinates system, seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses Chapters 2 and S1 The celestial sphere and the coordinates system Chapter S1 How to find our way in the sky? Let s

More information

Knowing the Heavens. Goals: Constellations in the Sky

Knowing the Heavens. Goals: Constellations in the Sky Goals: Knowing the Heavens To see how the sky changes during a night and from night to night. To measure the positions of stars in celestial coordinates. To understand the cause of the seasons. Constellations

More information

BROCK UNIVERSITY. 1. About 2300 years ago, Aristotle argued that the Earth is spherical based on a number of observations, one of which was that

BROCK UNIVERSITY. 1. About 2300 years ago, Aristotle argued that the Earth is spherical based on a number of observations, one of which was that BROCK UNIVERSITY Page 1 of 10 Test 2: November 2015 Number of pages: 10 Course: ASTR 1P01, Section 2 Number of students: 861 Examination date: 7 November 2015 Time limit: 50 min Time of Examination: 13:00

More information

Seasons. What causes the seasons?

Seasons. What causes the seasons? Questions: Seasons What causes the seasons? How do we mark the progression of the seasons? What is the seasonal motion of the sun in the sky? What could cause the seasonal motion of the sun to change over

More information