Local Coordinates. These are centered upon you, the observer.

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Local Coordinates. These are centered upon you, the observer."

Transcription

1 Astronomy 30, Observing #3 Name: Lab Partners: Date: Materials: This lab, with the star chart completed from the pre-lab. Some sheets of paper for sketches. A pencil with eraser. A small flashlight, ideally with either a red bulb, or some red cellophane taped over the light (that helps to preserve night vision). Warm clothes!!! INDOORS: Before we go out, look at the various coordinate figures near the end of lab, which illustrate aspects of three different coordinate systems that we use. Local Coordinates. These are centered upon you, the observer. Terrestrial Coordinates. These are centered upon, and used to locate things on, Earth. One major reference is the equator, which divides Earth into northern and southern hemispheres. The other is the Prime Meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England, and divides Earth into eastern and western hemispheres. Distance north or south of the equator is measured in angles of latitude. Distance east or west of the Prime Meridian is measured in degrees longitude. Celestial Coordinates. Those are used to locate objects on the Celestial Sphere, which is an imaginary Sphere surrounding Earth. Declination measures angles north or south of the Celestial Equator, which is the projection of Earth s equator onto the sky. Angles eastward are measured using Right Ascension, starting from the Vernal Equinox. The final figure shows the relation between the Ecliptic and the Celestial Equator. The Ecliptic is the path that Sun appears to follow through the sky over the course of one year. Now, answer the following questions:

2 1) What line on the sky does the Sun cross at noon (think of local coordinates)? 2) Yellowknife, Canada is almost due North of us. Would the Zenith for an observer in Yellowknife point at the same point on the Celestial Sphere at 10 pm as it does for an observer in Livermore? Why or why not? 3) How far above the horizon would the North Celestial Pole be if you lived on the equator? How about if you lived at the North Pole? Using those differences, how far above the northern horizon would we see the North Celestial pole? Livermore is at approximately 38 degrees North latitude. 4) Repeat your reasoning above to determine how far above the horizon the Celestial Equator will be where it crosses the meridian, as viewed in Livermore. Zodiacal constellations are of no special significance to astronomy. They are assigned special significance in astrology because the Sun, Moon, and planets appear to pass through them. 5) Why do the Sun, Moon, and planets all follow the ecliptic in the sky? 6) What determines the tilt of the Ecliptic relative to the Celestial Equator?

3 7) Which way does the Sun move along the Ecliptic, east-to-west, or west-to-east. This can be a bit of a brain twister, and you may want to act it out. 8) Look at the star chart at the end of the lab. Which Zodiacal constellations might we be able to see tonight? 9) What constellations does the Celestial equator pass through on the part of the sky that is visible tonight? 10) One of the equinoxes is above the horizon tonight. Which one is it? In what month of the year would the Sun be at that equinox? OUTDOORS: A) Constellations From last time, point out to me Cassiopeia, the Big Dipper, and show me how to find Polaris. Look to the South, and point out to me Orion, the Winter Triangle, and name the stars that make up the Winter Triangle. Then point out Leo, Gemini, and Taurus. Indicate to me the path of the Ecliptic and the Celestial Equator from the pre-lab. Once you ve done all of this, get my initials here. Now identify as many of the Zodiacal constellations as you can, and point them out to me. Also indicate for me the approximate location of the equinox that is in the sky tonight. You might need aides to finding some of the Zodiacal constellations. Leo, Gemini, and Taurus (if it s still up) are no problem. Cancer is very hard to see from our location. Look for a few faint stars between Leo and Gemini. Virgo is also difficult, though it has one bright star, Spica. To find Spica, start from, of all things, the Big Dipper. Follow the arc of the handle of the Big Dipper away from the bowl. You will come to a bright red star, Arcturus (the phrase astronomers use to remember this is, Follow the arc to Arcturus ). Continuing along that path ( Speed on to Spica ), you will come to a bright blue star, with no bright stars around it. That s Spica.

4 Once you ve shown me the Zodical constellations and the location of the equinox, get my initials here. B) Look through a telescope If I can find them, I ll show you h and chi Perseii. Sketch them, and answer the following: 11) What are h and chi Perseii (a Google search should give plenty of information)? HAND IN YOUR RESULTS NEXT WEEK This is an informal lab report. Hand in these sheets, plus any other ones that you used. Make sure to include the pages with my initials, the star chart that you completed in the pre-lab, your sketches, and the answers to the questions.

5

6

7

8

9

Name: Date: 5. The bright stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair form A) the summer triangle. B) the winter triangle. C) the Big Dipper. D) Orion, the Hunter.

Name: Date: 5. The bright stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair form A) the summer triangle. B) the winter triangle. C) the Big Dipper. D) Orion, the Hunter. Name: Date: 1. If there are about 6000 stars in the entire sky that can be seen by the unaided human eye, about how many stars would be seen at a particular instant on a given dark night from a single

More information

Astronomy 101: 9/18/2008

Astronomy 101: 9/18/2008 Astronomy 101: 9/18/2008 Announcements Pick up a golf ball at the front of the class or get one from Alex; you will need it for an in-class activity today. You will also need the question sheet from Alex.

More information

Phys Lab #1: The Sun and the Constellations

Phys Lab #1: The Sun and the Constellations Phys 10293 Lab #1: The Sun and the Constellations Introduction Astronomers use a coordinate system that is fixed to Earth s latitude and longitude. This way, the coordinates of a star or planet are the

More information

Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession (?)

Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession (?) Today Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession (?) The Celestial Sphere Stars at different distances all appear to lie on the celestial sphere. The ecliptic is the Sun s apparent

More information

Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession (?)

Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession (?) Today Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession (?) The Celestial Sphere Stars at different distances all appear to lie on the celestial sphere. The ecliptic is the Sun s apparent

More information

ASTRO Fall 2012 LAB #2: Observing the Night Sky

ASTRO Fall 2012 LAB #2: Observing the Night Sky ASTRO 1050 - Fall 2012 LAB #2: Observing the Night Sky ABSTRACT Today we will be calibrating your hand as an angular measuring device, and then heading down to the planetarium to see the night sky in motion.

More information

Chapter 1: Discovering the Night Sky. The sky is divided into 88 unequal areas that we call constellations.

Chapter 1: Discovering the Night Sky. The sky is divided into 88 unequal areas that we call constellations. Chapter 1: Discovering the Night Sky Constellations: Recognizable patterns of the brighter stars that have been derived from ancient legends. Different cultures have associated the patterns with their

More information

5 - Seasons. Figure 1 shows two pictures of the Sun taken six months apart with the same camera, at the same time of the day, from the same location.

5 - Seasons. Figure 1 shows two pictures of the Sun taken six months apart with the same camera, at the same time of the day, from the same location. Name: Partner(s): 5 - Seasons ASTR110L Purpose: To measure the distance of the Earth from the Sun over one year and to use the celestial sphere to understand the cause of the seasons. Answer all questions

More information

A2 Principi di Astrofisica. Coordinate Celesti

A2 Principi di Astrofisica. Coordinate Celesti A2 Principi di Astrofisica Coordinate Celesti ESO La Silla Tel. 3.6m Celestial Sphere Our lack of depth perception when we look into space creates the illusion that Earth is surrounded by a celestial sphere.

More information

Summary Sheet #1 for Astronomy Main Lesson

Summary Sheet #1 for Astronomy Main Lesson Summary Sheet #1 for Astronomy Main Lesson From our perspective on earth The earth appears flat. We can see half the celestial sphere at any time. The earth s axis is always perpendicular to the equator.

More information

3 - Celestial Sphere

3 - Celestial Sphere 3 - Celestial Sphere Purpose: To construct and use a celestial sphere to show the motion of the Sun and stars in the sky. There are six questions, Q1 Q6, to answer on a separate piece of paper. Due: in

More information

Lecture 2 Motions in the Sky September 10, 2018

Lecture 2 Motions in the Sky September 10, 2018 1 Lecture 2 Motions in the Sky September 10, 2018 2 What is your year in school? A. New freshman B. Returning freshman C. Sophomore D. Junior E. Senior F. I ve been here, like, forever 3 What is your major?

More information

The Sky. Day sky: the Sun, occasionally the Moon. Night Sky: stars, and sometimes the Moon

The Sky. Day sky: the Sun, occasionally the Moon. Night Sky: stars, and sometimes the Moon The Sky Day sky: the Sun, occasionally the Moon Night Sky: stars, and sometimes the Moon So MANY objects.how Do We Make Sense of it ALL?? Goal How to describe the locations of objects in the sky To understand

More information

Lecture 2: Motions of the Earth and Moon. Astronomy 111 Wednesday August 30, 2017

Lecture 2: Motions of the Earth and Moon. Astronomy 111 Wednesday August 30, 2017 Lecture 2: Motions of the Earth and Moon Astronomy 111 Wednesday August 30, 2017 Reminders Online homework #1 due Monday at 3pm Labs start next week Motions of the Earth ASTR111 Lecture 2 Observation:

More information

Introduction To Modern Astronomy I: Solar System

Introduction To Modern Astronomy I: Solar System ASTR 111 003 Fall 2007 Lecture 02 Sep. 10, 2007 Introduction To Modern Astronomy I: Solar System Introducing Astronomy (chap. 1-6) Planets and Moons (chap. 7-15) Chap. 16: Our Sun Chap. 28: Search for

More information

Topic Guide: The Celestial Sphere. GCSE (9-1) Astronomy. Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9-1) in Astronomy (1AS0)

Topic Guide: The Celestial Sphere. GCSE (9-1) Astronomy. Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9-1) in Astronomy (1AS0) Topic Guide: The Celestial Sphere GCSE (9-1) Astronomy Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9-1) in Astronomy (1AS0) The Celestial Sphere Contents Specification Points 1 The Astronomy 2 Equatorial coordinates

More information

Day, Night & the Seasons. Lecture 2 1/21/2014

Day, Night & the Seasons. Lecture 2 1/21/2014 Day, Night & the Seasons Lecture 2 1/21/2014 Logistics The following students see me after class: A. Gonzalez, Chen Anyone who was not here on first day see me after class Pin Numbers - if you have not

More information

10/17/2012. Observing the Sky. Lecture 8. Chapter 2 Opener

10/17/2012. Observing the Sky. Lecture 8. Chapter 2 Opener Observing the Sky Lecture 8 Chapter 2 Opener 1 Figure 2.1 Figure 2.2 2 Figure 2.6 Figure 2.4 Annotated 3 The Celestial Sphere The celestial sphere is the vast hollow sphere on which the stars appear fixed.

More information

Astronomy 122 Section 1 TR Outline. The Earth is Rotating. Question Digital Computer Laboratory

Astronomy 122 Section 1 TR Outline. The Earth is Rotating. Question Digital Computer Laboratory Astronomy 122 Section 1 TR 1300-1350 Outline 1320 Digital Computer Laboratory Leslie Looney Phone: 244-3615 Email: lwlw@wuiucw. wedu Office: Astro Building #218 Office Hours: T 10:30-11:30 a.m. or by appointment

More information

Section 2. Locating Astronomical Objects in the Night Sky What Do You See? What Do You See? Think About It. Investigate.

Section 2. Locating Astronomical Objects in the Night Sky What Do You See? What Do You See? Think About It. Investigate. Section 2 Locating Astronomical Objects in the Night Sky Section 2 Locating Astronomical Objects in the Night Sky What Do You See? What Do You See? Learning Outcomes In this section, you will Construct

More information

BU Astronomy Department AS 10X courses. Night Lab 2 What s the name of that star?

BU Astronomy Department AS 10X courses. Night Lab 2 What s the name of that star? BU Astronomy Department AS 10X courses Night Lab 2 What s the name of that star? The objectives for this Night Lab are: To learn how to find constellations and other objects in the sky using a star chart

More information

Discovering the Night Sky

Discovering the Night Sky Discovering the Night Sky Guiding Questions 1. What role did astronomy play in ancient civilizations? 2. Are the stars that make up a constellation actually close to one another? 3. Are the same stars

More information

Discovering the Night Sky

Discovering the Night Sky Guiding Questions Discovering the Night Sky 1. What role did astronomy play in ancient civilizations? 2. Are the stars that make up a constellation actually close to one another? 3. Are the same stars

More information

Knowing the Heavens. Chapter Two. Guiding Questions. Naked-eye (unaided-eye) astronomy had an important place in ancient civilizations

Knowing the Heavens. Chapter Two. Guiding Questions. Naked-eye (unaided-eye) astronomy had an important place in ancient civilizations Knowing the Heavens Chapter Two Guiding Questions 1. What role did astronomy play in ancient civilizations? 2. Are the stars that make up a constellation actually close to one another? 3. Are the same

More information

What do you think? 2/3/09. Mastering Astronomy Assignment 2. Constellations the 88 semi-rectangular regions that make up the sky

What do you think? 2/3/09. Mastering Astronomy Assignment 2. Constellations the 88 semi-rectangular regions that make up the sky //09 Mastering Astronomy Assignment Due Feb 0, am Read Chapter Constellations the 88 semi-rectangular regions that make up the sky Northern constellations have Latinized Greek-mythology names: Orion, Cygnus,

More information

The. Astronomy is full of cycles. Like the day, the month, & the year In this section we will try to understand these cycles.

The. Astronomy is full of cycles. Like the day, the month, & the year In this section we will try to understand these cycles. Understanding The Sky Astronomy is full of cycles Like the day, the month, & the year In this section we will try to understand these cycles. For Example Why do we think of stars as nighttime objects?

More information

It s Full of Stars! Outline. A Sky Full of Stars. Astronomy 210. lights), about how many stars can we see with

It s Full of Stars! Outline. A Sky Full of Stars. Astronomy 210. lights), about how many stars can we see with Astronomy 210 Section 1 MWF 1500-1550 134 Astronomy Building Leslie Looney Phone: 244-3615 Email: lwlw@wuiucw. wedu Office: Astro Building #218 Office Hours: MTF 10:30-11:30 a.m. or by appointment This

More information

USING YOUR FIELD GUIDE AND STAR CHARTS

USING YOUR FIELD GUIDE AND STAR CHARTS USING YOUR FIELD GUIDE AND STAR CHARTS What will you learn in this Lab? By this point you should be familiar with the layout of the Night Sky and how you find your way around it, or at least you should

More information

Oberth: Energy vs. Momentum

Oberth: Energy vs. Momentum 1 2 The Oberth Effect 3 Oberth: Energy vs. Momentum 4 The Celestial Sphere From our perspective on Earth the stars appear embedded on a distant 2-dimensional surface the Celestial Sphere. 5 The Celestial

More information

USING YOUR FIELD GUIDE AND STAR CHARTS PRELAB

USING YOUR FIELD GUIDE AND STAR CHARTS PRELAB USING YOUR FIELD GUIDE AND STAR CHARTS PRELAB 1. Explain the main differences between using a star wheel and a star chart to find things in the night sky. 2. Explain the terms Hour Angle, Meridian and

More information

Introduction To Astronomy Lesson 1

Introduction To Astronomy Lesson 1 Introduction To Astronomy Lesson 1 Topics for this Lesson Earth Based Coordinates The Celestial Sphere and Sky Coordinates The North Star Measuring Distances on the Sky The Motion of Objects in the Sky

More information

Meridian Circle through Zenith, North Celestial Pole, Zenith Direction Straight Up from Observer. South Celestial Pole

Meridian Circle through Zenith, North Celestial Pole, Zenith Direction Straight Up from Observer. South Celestial Pole Chapter 3 How Earth and Sky Work- Effects of Latitude In chapters 3 and 4we will learn why our view of the heavens depends on our position on the Earth, the time of day, and the day of the year. We will

More information

Measuring the Sky (Summer, Night Lab)

Measuring the Sky (Summer, Night Lab) Name(s): Date: Course/Section: Grade: Measuring the Sky (Summer, Night Lab) Objectives: Students will familiarize themselves with altitude and azimuth and estimating angles in the sky. Checklist: Complete

More information

LOCATING CELESTIAL OBJECTS: COORDINATES AND TIME. a. understand the basic concepts needed for any astronomical coordinate system.

LOCATING CELESTIAL OBJECTS: COORDINATES AND TIME. a. understand the basic concepts needed for any astronomical coordinate system. UNIT 2 UNIT 2 LOCATING CELESTIAL OBJECTS: COORDINATES AND TIME Goals After mastery of this unit, you should: a. understand the basic concepts needed for any astronomical coordinate system. b. understand

More information

WHAT ARE THE CONSTELLATIONS

WHAT ARE THE CONSTELLATIONS CONSTELLATIONS WHAT ARE THE CONSTELLATIONS In popular usage, the term constellation is used to denote a recognizable grouping of stars. Astronomers have redefined the constellations as 88 regions of the

More information

Time, coordinates and how the Sun and Moon move in the sky

Time, coordinates and how the Sun and Moon move in the sky Time, coordinates and how the Sun and Moon move in the sky Using the colors and magnitudes of quasars drawn from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server to distinguish quasars from stars using the light they emit

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations we

More information

drinking straw, protractor, string, and rock. observer on Earth. Sun across the sky on March 21 as seen by an

drinking straw, protractor, string, and rock. observer on Earth. Sun across the sky on March 21 as seen by an 1. The diagram below represents some constellations and one position of Earth in its orbit around the Sun. These constellations are visible to an observer on Earth at different times of the year. When

More information

Knowing the Heavens. Goals: Constellations in the Sky

Knowing the Heavens. Goals: Constellations in the Sky Goals: Knowing the Heavens To see how the sky changes during a night and from night to night. To measure the positions of stars in celestial coordinates. To understand the cause of the seasons. Constellations

More information

Question 1. What motion is responsible for the apparent motion of the constellations (east to west) across the sky?

Question 1. What motion is responsible for the apparent motion of the constellations (east to west) across the sky? What motion is responsible for the apparent motion of the constellations (east to west) across the sky? Question 1 1) the motion of Earth around the Sun 2) the motion of the Moon around Earth 3) the motion

More information

Knowing the Heavens. Goals: Constellations in the Sky

Knowing the Heavens. Goals: Constellations in the Sky Goals: Knowing the Heavens To see how the sky changes during a night and from night to night. To measure the positions of stars in celestial coordinates. To understand the cause of the seasons. Constellations

More information

2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope )

2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope ) 2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope ) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html How do we locate stars in the heavens? What stars are visible from a given location? Where is the sun

More information

Day, Night & the Seasons. Lecture 2 1/15/2013

Day, Night & the Seasons. Lecture 2 1/15/2013 Day, Night & the Seasons Lecture 2 1/15/2013 Logistics The following students see me after class: Dahms, Doyle, Kavalle, Jennings, Melton, Polsky, Soriano, Augustinovich, Briggs Anyone who was not here

More information

The celestial sphere, the coordinates system, seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses. Chapters 2 and S1

The celestial sphere, the coordinates system, seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses. Chapters 2 and S1 The celestial sphere, the coordinates system, seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses Chapters 2 and S1 The celestial sphere and the coordinates system Chapter S1 How to find our way in the sky? Let s

More information

Celestial Sphere & Solar Motion Lab (Norton s Star Atlas pages 1-4)

Celestial Sphere & Solar Motion Lab (Norton s Star Atlas pages 1-4) Name: Date: Celestial Sphere & Solar Motion Lab (Norton s Star Atlas pages 1-4) Italicized topics below will be covered only at the instructor s discretion. 1.0 Purpose: To understand a) the celestial

More information

CELESTIAL COORDINATES

CELESTIAL COORDINATES ASTR 1030 Astronomy Lab 27 Celestial Coordinates CELESTIAL COORDINATES GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATES The Earth's geographic coordinate system is familiar to everyone - the north and south poles are defined by

More information

FYI. 0 You will need to take notes this information will come in handy when going through this unit and on the cok.

FYI. 0 You will need to take notes this information will come in handy when going through this unit and on the cok. FYI 0 You will need to take notes this information will come in handy when going through this unit and on the cok. One of the best ways to get started as a backyard astronomer is to learn the constellations.

More information

Practice Exam #3. Part 1: The Circumpolar Constellations

Practice Exam #3. Part 1: The Circumpolar Constellations Practice Exam #3 2002 Ann Bykerk-Kauffman, Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico * Some Comments on the Real Exam This exam covers all material related to astronomy.

More information

Introduction to the sky

Introduction to the sky Introduction to the sky On a clear, moonless night, far from city lights, the night sky is magnificent. Roughly 2000 stars are visible to the unaided eye. If you know where to look, you can see Mercury,

More information

A Warm Up Exercise. The Motion of the Sun. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise

A Warm Up Exercise. The Motion of the Sun. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise A Warm Up Exercise The Motion of the Sun Which of the following is NOT true of a circumpolar star? a) It rises and sets from my latitude b) Its direction can be far North c) Its direction can be far South

More information

2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope )

2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope ) How do we locate stars in the heavens? 2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope ) What stars are visible from a given location? Where is the sun in the sky at any given time? Where are

More information

Astronomy 101 Lab Manual. Victor Andersen Community College of Aurora

Astronomy 101 Lab Manual. Victor Andersen Community College of Aurora Astronomy 101 Lab Manual Victor Andersen Community College of Aurora victor.andersen@ccaurora.edu January 8, 2013 2 Contents 1 Angular Measures 5 1.1 Introduction............................ 5 1.1.1 Degrees,

More information

Observing the Universe for Yourself

Observing the Universe for Yourself Observing the Universe for Yourself Figure 6-20 Solar-System Formation What does the universe look like from Earth? With the naked eye, we can see more than 2,000 stars as well as the Milky Way. A constellation

More information

Name: AST 114 Date: THE DEEP SKY

Name: AST 114 Date: THE DEEP SKY Name: AST 114 Date: THE DEEP SKY The purpose of this lab is to familiarize the student with the use of the planisphere, sky atlas, and coordinate systems for the night sky and introduce the student to

More information

Yr1 Lesson 1. The Great Circles of Astrology, the Angles, Precession,

Yr1 Lesson 1. The Great Circles of Astrology, the Angles, Precession, Yr1 Lesson 1 The Great Circles of Astrology, the Angles, Precession, Cosmic Intelligence Agency 2015 Astro Lesson 1! Signs, Symbols, Glyphs and Charts! The Celestial Sphere Great Circles of Astrology -

More information

Lecture 4: August 30, 2010

Lecture 4: August 30, 2010 Lecture 4: August 30, 2010 How many hospitals are there in the USA? Announcements: First homework has been posted Due Friday (10 th ) First Observatory Opportunity Thursday Night September 2, 8:30pm Will

More information

Precession and The Celestial Poles

Precession and The Celestial Poles 1 Precession and The Celestial Poles The North Celestial Pole lies overhead for an observer at the North Pole and on the horizon for an observer on the Equator The altitude of the pole equals your latitude.

More information

Measuring the Sky (Spring, Night Lab)

Measuring the Sky (Spring, Night Lab) Name(s): Date: Course/Section: Grade: Measuring the Sky (Spring, Night Lab) Objectives: Students will familiarize themselves with altitude and azimuth and estimating angles in the sky. Checklist: Complete

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations we

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. What does the universe look like from Earth? Constellations. 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. What does the universe look like from Earth? Constellations. 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations we

More information

Using the Star Wheel Laboratory 2

Using the Star Wheel Laboratory 2 Objective: Using the Star Wheel Laboratory 2 This laboratory introduces the Star Wheel; which is a common tool used in backyard observing. This tool helps approximate the location of constellations and

More information

6/17. Universe from Smallest to Largest:

6/17. Universe from Smallest to Largest: 6/17 Universe from Smallest to Largest: 1. Quarks and Leptons fundamental building blocks of the universe size about 0 (?) importance: quarks combine together to form neutrons and protons. One of the leptons

More information

Using Angles. Looking at the Night Sky. Rising and Setting Stars. Nightly Motion of the Stars. Nightly Motion of the Stars

Using Angles. Looking at the Night Sky. Rising and Setting Stars. Nightly Motion of the Stars. Nightly Motion of the Stars Looking at the Night Sky How to find your way around: Position -> where is that object? Distance -> how much space between these two things? Motion -> where will that object be later tonight? Bright/faint

More information

Science 9 Observing Project

Science 9 Observing Project Science 9 Observing Project Why? To get you to learn more about the sky and what s in it. You ll use your star chart to look at constellations and the moon over the next two weeks. What You ll Need: your

More information

Name Class Date. For each pair of terms, explain how the meanings of the terms differ.

Name Class Date. For each pair of terms, explain how the meanings of the terms differ. Skills Worksheet Chapter Review USING KEY TERMS 1. Use each of the following terms in a separate sentence: year, month, day, astronomy, electromagnetic spectrum, constellation, and altitude. For each pair

More information

Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy. Positions in the sky. Lecture 3: The Sun & Constellations

Early history of astronomy. Early history of astronomy. Positions in the sky. Lecture 3: The Sun & Constellations Lecture 3: The Sun & Constellations Professor Kenny L. Tapp Early history of astronomy Birth of modern astronomy Noted scientist Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) Ushered in new astronomy Planets revolve around

More information

Astronomical coordinate systems. ASTR320 Monday January 22, 2018

Astronomical coordinate systems. ASTR320 Monday January 22, 2018 Astronomical coordinate systems ASTR320 Monday January 22, 2018 Special public talk this week: Mike Brown, Pluto Killer Wednesday at 7:30pm in MPHY204 Other news Munnerlyn lab is hiring student engineers

More information

Astronomy. The Seasons

Astronomy. The Seasons Astronomy The Seasons The seasons are caused by the inclination of the Earth s axis: when a hemisphere is tipped toward the Sun, the Sun is more directly above it. At the Summer Solstice the tilt is most

More information

2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope )

2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope ) 2. Descriptive Astronomy ( Astronomy Without a Telescope ) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html How do we locate stars in the heavens? What stars are visible from a given location? Where is the sun

More information

1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.) Equinox b.) Celestial equator c.) Solstice d.) Ecliptic

1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.) Equinox b.) Celestial equator c.) Solstice d.) Ecliptic Chapter 1 1-1. How long does it take the Earth to orbit the Sun? a.) one sidereal day b.) one month c.) one year d.) one hour 1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.)

More information

Brock University. Test 1, September 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: September 29, 2014

Brock University. Test 1, September 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: September 29, 2014 Brock University Test 1, September 2014 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: September 29, 2014 Number of hours: 50 min Time of Examination: 18:00 18:50 Instructor:

More information

Name: Partner(s): Day/Time: Version: plan

Name: Partner(s): Day/Time: Version: plan Precession of the equinoxes https://dept.astro.lsa.umich.edu/ugactivities/labs/precession/precession.html 1 of 3 7/27/2016 10:14 PM Name: Partner(s): Day/Time: Version: plan Precession - Planetarium Activity

More information

5 - Seasons. Figure 1 shows two pictures of the Sun taken six months apart with the same camera, at the same time of the day, from the same location.

5 - Seasons. Figure 1 shows two pictures of the Sun taken six months apart with the same camera, at the same time of the day, from the same location. ASTR 110L 5 - Seasons Purpose: To plot the distance of the Earth from the Sun over one year and to use the celestial sphere to understand the cause of the seasons. What do you think? Write answers to questions

More information

PHSC 1053: Astronomy Time and Coordinates

PHSC 1053: Astronomy Time and Coordinates PHSC 1053: Astronomy Time and Coordinates Astronomical Clocks Earth s Rotation on its Axis Time between two successive meridian transits of the sun 1 solar day (our adopted clock time) 24 hours (86,400

More information

Tutoring information, as announced in class

Tutoring information, as announced in class Announcements Register for Connect, register your iclickers - Register iclickers at https://www1.iclicker.com/ or REEF account profile - Purchase the REEF polling app, create an account, register and get

More information

Astronomy 122 TR Chemistry Annex. Outline. Question. The Data Look up at the night sky. What are the Data?

Astronomy 122 TR Chemistry Annex. Outline. Question. The Data Look up at the night sky. What are the Data? Leslie Looney Phone: 244-3615 Email: lwlw@wuiucw. wedu Office: Astro Building #218 Office Hours: W 11:00 a.m noon or by appointment Astronomy 122 TR 1300-1350 112 Chemistry Annex Homework #1 due Sunday

More information

Coordinates on the Sphere

Coordinates on the Sphere Survey Observations Coordinates on the Sphere Any position on the surface of a sphere (such as the Earth or the night sky) can be expressed in terms of the angular coordinates latitude and longitude Latitude

More information

Name: Lab Day and Time: Earth and Sky Finding your way. Lab Partner 1: Lab Partner 2: Lab Partner 3: Introduction:

Name: Lab Day and Time: Earth and Sky Finding your way. Lab Partner 1: Lab Partner 2: Lab Partner 3: Introduction: 2 Lab Partner 1: Lab Partner 2: Lab Partner 3: Name: Lab Day and Time: Earth and Sky Finding your way Introduction: If you are a traveler to a new place you will generally seek a map to help you explore

More information

Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION

Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION Astronomy A BEGINNER S GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE EIGHTH EDITION CHAPTER 0 Charting the Heavens Lecture Presentation 0.0 Astronmy a why is that subject! Q. What rare astronomical event happened in late summer

More information

Agenda. LAB (Inst. Dickinson): Lab Constellation/Star Quiz Angular Measurement Lab

Agenda. LAB (Inst. Dickinson): Lab Constellation/Star Quiz Angular Measurement Lab LAB (Inst. Dickinson): Lab Constellation/Star Quiz Angular Measurement Lab Agenda LECTURE (Prof. Canales): Discuss Formal Lab Report on FOV- Due Tues 2/15 LAB PREP: Unit Conversion Review Dec. & RA and

More information

Sky, Celestial Sphere and Constellations

Sky, Celestial Sphere and Constellations Sky, Celestial Sphere and Constellations Last lecture Galaxies are the main building blocks of the universe. Consists of few billions to hundreds of billions of stars, gas clouds (nebulae), star clusters,

More information

The Sky Perceptions of the Sky

The Sky Perceptions of the Sky The Sky Perceptions of the Sky An Observer-Centered Hemisphere Night & Day - Black & Blue - Stars & Sun Atmospheric & Astronomical Phenomena Weather, Clouds, Rainbows,... versus Sun, Moon, Stars, Planets,...

More information

The Nature of Stars. The Nature of Stars

The Nature of Stars. The Nature of Stars The Nature of Stars The total number of stars is beyond our ability to count Only a few stars have been studied in detail. To understand the nature of stars, we will compare and catalog the stars by: Physical

More information

Brock University. Test 1, October 2016 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: October 3, 2016

Brock University. Test 1, October 2016 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: October 3, 2016 Brock University Test 1, October 2016 Number of pages: 9 Course: ASTR 1P01 Number of Students: 500 Date of Examination: October 3, 2016 Number of hours: 50 min Time of Examination: 17:00 17:50 Instructor:

More information

Constellations In ancient times, constellations only referred to the brightest stars that appeared to form groups, representing mythological figures.

Constellations In ancient times, constellations only referred to the brightest stars that appeared to form groups, representing mythological figures. Chapter 2: The Sky Constellations In ancient times, constellations only referred to the brightest stars that appeared to form groups, representing mythological figures. Constellations Today, constellations

More information

A Sense of Scale and The Motions of Earth. The guitar player Pablo Picasso (1910)

A Sense of Scale and The Motions of Earth. The guitar player Pablo Picasso (1910) A Sense of Scale and The Motions of Earth The guitar player Pablo Picasso (1910) Announcements n Notes from the first lecture are available on the class web site (www.astro.umass.edu/~calzetti/astro100).

More information

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself. Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 2 Discovering the Universe for Yourself 1 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the universe look like from Earth? Why do stars rise and set? Why do the constellations

More information

REVIEW CH #0. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1)

REVIEW CH #0. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1) REVIEW CH #0 TRUE/FALSE. Write 'T' if the statement is true and 'F' if the statement is false. 1) Right ascension in the sky is very similar to latitude on the Earth. 1) 2) Latitude and right ascension

More information

BOY SCOUT ASTRONOMY MERIT BADGE WORKSHOP

BOY SCOUT ASTRONOMY MERIT BADGE WORKSHOP Feb2018 BOY SCOUT ASTRONOMY MERIT BADGE WORKSHOP The session is from 8:00am-12:30pm. All pre-requisite questions must be done on your own or with your troop BEFORE 8am on workshop day. Name Troop Leader

More information

Aileen A. O Donoghue Priest Associate Professor of Physics

Aileen A. O Donoghue Priest Associate Professor of Physics SOAR: The Sky in Motion Life on the Tilted Teacup Ride Celestial Coordinates and the Day Aileen A. O Donoghue Priest Associate Professor of Physics Reference Points Poles Equator Prime Meridian Greenwich,

More information

Chapter 2 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 2 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Discovering the Universe for Yourself Discovering the Universe for Yourself 2.1 Patterns in the Night Sky Our goals for learning: What does the

More information

Constellations and Asterisms

Constellations and Asterisms Constellations and Asterisms Constellations When ancient people looked at the sky they saw patterns and gave names to apparent groups of stars. Constellation patterns have been found on tablets over 4000

More information

Motions in the Sky. Stars Planets Sun Moon. Photos - APOD. Motions in the Sky - I. Intro to Solar System

Motions in the Sky. Stars Planets Sun Moon. Photos - APOD. Motions in the Sky - I. Intro to Solar System Motions in the Sky Stars Planets Sun Moon Photos - APOD 1 STARS: background for motion of other objects patterns - constellations zodiac: special set of constellations trace the apparent path of the Sun

More information

2. Modern: A constellation is a region in the sky. Every object in the sky, whether we can see it or not, is part of a constellation.

2. Modern: A constellation is a region in the sky. Every object in the sky, whether we can see it or not, is part of a constellation. 6/14 10. Star Cluster size about 10 14 to 10 17 m importance: where stars are born composed of stars. 11. Galaxy size about 10 21 m importance: provide a stable environment for stars. Composed of stars.

More information

A Sky Full of Stars - II.

A Sky Full of Stars - II. A Sky Full of Stars - II. Learning Objectives! What is the latitude of the Equator and of the Earth s North and South Poles? What is the declination of the Celestial Equator and of the Celestial Poles?!

More information

CHARTING THE HEAVENS USING A VIRTUAL PLANETARIUM

CHARTING THE HEAVENS USING A VIRTUAL PLANETARIUM Name Partner(s) Section Date CHARTING THE HEAVENS USING A VIRTUAL PLANETARIUM You have had the opportunity to look at two different tools to display the night sky, the celestial sphere and the star chart.

More information

The Rotating Sky Student Guide

The Rotating Sky Student Guide III. Horizon Coordinates The Rotating Sky Student Guide Don t write your answers on here! 1.) Complete the following table involving the horizon coordinate system. You should predict the answers and then

More information

ASTRONOMICAL COORDINATE SYSTEMS CELESTIAL SPHERE

ASTRONOMICAL COORDINATE SYSTEMS CELESTIAL SPHERE ASTRONOMICAL COORDINATE SYSTEMS CELESTIAL SPHERE To the naked eye, stars appear fixed on the sky with respect to one another. These patterns are often grouped into constellations. Angular measurements

More information